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Harmful components that produced from sealing Poly ethylene bags


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mohamed ahmed yusuf

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 09:35 AM

Dears,

Does anyone had an experience with sealing poly ethylene bags ? I heard that there are harmful components that similar to DPA into the chemical structure (which is a pesticide) and this un acceptable for the food contact packaging material, if this is true,  is there a list with these harmful components and limits according to FDA, EFSA?

Thanks for your concern and help!


M.Yusuf


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Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:09 AM

Hi Yousuf

 

the following table clearly state that poly ethylene bags pose no known health risk See no 4. Having said that please read the following article for more info

 

Which plastics are which?

Some plastics are safer than others. Use this table to see which ones are best avoided. 

Identification code Type of plastic Uses Risks 1 Polyethylene terephthalate (PET)
  • Bottles used for water and softdrinks
  • Jars for products such as peanut butter
  • Lightweight and 'green' wine bottles
No known health hazards. 2 High density polyethylene (HDPE)
  • Bottles used for milk and cream
  • Yoghurt cups
  • Bags that line breakfast cereal packets
No known health hazards. 3 Polyvinyl chloride (PVC)
  • Shrink and cling wrap
  • Clear plastic containers for fresh fruit or takeaway sandwiches
  • Some soft drink bottles
  • The gaskets that form a seal on screw-cap glass jars
Contains plasticisers such as DEHA or phthalates that can leach into food. 4 Low density polyethylene (LDPE)
  • Take-away containers
  • Waterproof coating on milk cartons
  • Bags used for bread and frozen foods
  • Cling wrap
No known health hazards. 5 Polypropylene (PP)
  • Bottle caps
  • Yoghurt and margarine containers
  • Food storage boxes
No known health hazards. 6 Polystyrene (PS)
  • Plastic cutlery
  • Drinking cups and yoghurt cups
  • Cups for hot coffee (polystyrene foam)
  • Lightweight trays used by supermarket to package and sometimes vegetables (polystyrene foam)
Researchers have investigated possible health risks from traces of styrene monomer. This risk seems to be low. 7 The number 7 is used as a catch-all for any other plastics, one of which is polycarbonate.
  • Bottles for sauces and condiments
  • Babies' feeding bottles and infants' drinking cups
  • Reusable water bottles for cyclists and athletes
Polycarbonate can release BPA into food, especially when bottles are washed for reus

 



mohamed ahmed yusuf

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 09:45 AM

Thanks Khan for your help!

But still i have an inquiry about the harmful components that could be residue from sealing polyethylene bags (Low density polyethylene bags) by high temperature?

for component called BPA, what is the limit of it and is it can be produced from sealing with high temperature (more than 150 C).

Kind regards 

Mohamed 


M.Yusuf


beautiophile

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 01:48 AM

Dears,

Does anyone had an experience with sealing poly ethylene bags ? I heard that there are harmful components that similar to DPA into the chemical structure (which is a pesticide) and this un acceptable for the food contact packaging material, if this is true,  is there a list with these harmful components and limits according to FDA, EFSA?

Thanks for your concern and help!

Just curious, how on earth can the sealing heat make azotic (DPA) or aromatic (BPA) compounds from long alkylic PE macromolecules?

If there are hazardous byproducts, they likely came from the stage of PE resin production. Collecting MSDSs and CoAs of materials can reveal some other components. The fabrication of PE film sheets or bags hardly creates any addition chemicals because of the inert nature of PE. 



mohamed ahmed yusuf

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 06:40 AM

Just curious, how on earth can the sealing heat make azotic (DPA) or aromatic (BPA) compounds from long alkylic PE macromolecules?

If there are hazardous byproducts, they likely came from the stage of PE resin production. Collecting MSDSs and CoAs of materials can reveal some other components. The fabrication of PE film sheets or bags hardly creates any addition chemicals because of the inert nature of PE. 

I'm not an expert into the poly ethylene industry but i heard that there are by products produced from sealing low density poly ethylene bags by high temperature more than 150 degrees , so i asked to know from if this is real or not ? and if it was real, what is the limit of it according to FDA or EFSA?


M.Yusuf





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