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#1 CStockert

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 08:08 PM

Hey Everyone, 

 

I am doing CIP validations at the Dairy Plant I work at. 

 

Does anyone know how often these are supposed to be conducted according to the FDA or SQF, or what is just a good standard practice. 

 

For example, how often should you validate with clean swabs and allergen swabs? 

 



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 09:41 PM

Hey Everyone, 

 

I am doing CIP validations at the Dairy Plant I work at. 

 

Does anyone know how often these are supposed to be conducted according to the FDA or SQF, or what is just a good standard practice. 

 

For example, how often should you validate with clean swabs and allergen swabs? 

 

Dairy not my area of expertise however some users here may be aware of specific validation procedures for CIP

 

From a more general CIP POV can try this post/thread/sublinks -

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...ip/#entry115706


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 Ryan M.

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Posted 25 September 2019 - 07:03 PM

Typically, annually or when there is a change that may impact the cleaning of the equipment.

 

CIP validation is a bit unique and in my eyes easier to do.  For CIP you need to verify the metrics monitored are being achieved by the system for that piece of equipment.  For example, if you have a tank that requires a certain minimum flow and pressure to wash you verify the flow and pressure is achieved and maintained throughout the wash.  For chemicals you can utilize the literature from your chemical supplier such as their recommended time, temperature, and concentrations.  Then you just verify against your CIP circuit for a wash.  As an additional step you can validate with visual inspection and swabs of any type (micro, ATP, allergen if that applies).  I would recommend if you do swabbing you take swabs before and after CIP of the same spots on the equipment.

 

An alternative to swabbing is capturing rinse water.  This is better for equipment like lines or heat exchangers where visual inspection and swabbing product contact surfaces are more challenging.

 

Of course with heat exchangers (Plate and Frame) I would open and inspect those at least annually after CIP.  May need to be more frequent depending on the products you are running and pasteurization temperatures.



#4 Charles.C

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 04:41 AM

Typically, annually or when there is a change that may impact the cleaning of the equipment.

 

CIP validation is a bit unique and in my eyes easier to do.  For CIP you need to verify the metrics monitored are being achieved by the system for that piece of equipment.  For example, if you have a tank that requires a certain minimum flow and pressure to wash you verify the flow and pressure is achieved and maintained throughout the wash.  For chemicals you can utilize the literature from your chemical supplier such as their recommended time, temperature, and concentrations.  Then you just verify against your CIP circuit for a wash.  As an additional step you can validate with visual inspection and swabs of any type (micro, ATP, allergen if that applies).  I would recommend if you do swabbing you take swabs before and after CIP of the same spots on the equipment.

 

An alternative to swabbing is capturing rinse water.  This is better for equipment like lines or heat exchangers where visual inspection and swabbing product contact surfaces are more challenging.

 

Of course with heat exchangers (Plate and Frame) I would open and inspect those at least annually after CIP.  May need to be more frequent depending on the products you are running and pasteurization temperatures.

 

Hi Ryan,

 

Thks for above.

 

Is the topic detailed more quantitatively anywhere in the US Dairy Standards which I know are quite encyclopedic ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#5 Ryan M.

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 07:34 PM

Hi Ryan,

 

Thks for above.

 

Is the topic detailed more quantitatively anywhere in the US Dairy Standards which I know are quite encyclopedic ?

 

Unfortunately there is not.  The regulators leave it to the facilities to ensure the equipment is cleaned at the frequency required.  They don't tell you how to clean it, or give any guidelines, but rather they will come in and inspect equipment after cleaning.  That's about the extent of it.

 

Generally, facilities utilize their chemical supplier, and sometimes the engineering firm or equipment suppliers, to assist with the validation of the cleaning of equipment.



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#6 Priyank

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 12:50 AM

Hi CStockert,
I will be doing my first dairy CIP validation in next few months. If possible please share your journey and knowledge. Thanks. Regards.






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