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Does anyone have a dry sanitation cleaning instructions for machinery?

Dry Sanitation Cleaning

Best Answer Parkz58, 29 October 2019 - 02:20 PM

It would help to know your particulars...what kind of facility, what standard you are trying to achieve, proximity to open/exposed product, etc.

 

Initial thoughts - there are a few ways to "dry clean" equipment:

 

1.  Designated brush and vacuum.  This is generally sufficient, though it will depend upon your particular situation.  If sanitizing is needed, you can then use a waterless sanitizer, like Purell Foodservice Surface Sanitizer.

 

2.  Dry ice blasting.  If you have stubborn buildup, or the brush and vacuum approach isn't working, dry ice blasting may work.

 

Just a few ideas...I'm sure there are other options out there, too.

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#1 cy2299

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Posted 26 October 2019 - 03:22 PM

Does anyone have a dry sanitation cleaning instructions for a tape/boxing machine that cannot have water or detergent cleaning?



#2 Sawad

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 05:32 AM

Hi, might this link will help you...

 

https://www.qualitya...ing-sanitation/



#3 cy2299

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 02:01 PM

Thanks for the article. IS there a specific step by step cleaning instruction known for tape machines and boxing machines. This equipment is very sensitive to moisture and if cleaned with water would incur damage. Does anyone know of specific cleaning for this type of equipment that is not to have any water associated with sanitation?



#4 MrHillman

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 02:51 PM

In this case I would ask the manufacturer how to clean their equipment.



#5 Parkz58

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 02:20 PM   Best Answer

It would help to know your particulars...what kind of facility, what standard you are trying to achieve, proximity to open/exposed product, etc.

 

Initial thoughts - there are a few ways to "dry clean" equipment:

 

1.  Designated brush and vacuum.  This is generally sufficient, though it will depend upon your particular situation.  If sanitizing is needed, you can then use a waterless sanitizer, like Purell Foodservice Surface Sanitizer.

 

2.  Dry ice blasting.  If you have stubborn buildup, or the brush and vacuum approach isn't working, dry ice blasting may work.

 

Just a few ideas...I'm sure there are other options out there, too.



#6 cy2299

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 03:32 PM

Thank you Parkz58. I have created a SSOP to use compressed air and blow off surfaces and to use a lint free cloth to wipe down after. These surfaces do not need sanitizer unless soiled with product and not the typical packaging debris.



#7 Parkz58

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 03:44 PM

cy2299, I would advise against using compressed air to blow off surfaces.  Compressed air just blows everything into the atmosphere, sometimes much further than you can even see, and the risk of contaminating other equipment or processes is just too great in most cases.

 

I would highly suggest using a vacuum instead, then wipe down with a clean, lint-free cloth if needed.



#8 cy2299

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 05:26 PM

The area is contained and proper PPE is used for compressed air use. A Vacuum cannot remove enough of the debris and any mechanical movement is to great a risk for equipment damage.






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