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#1 shwethahanka

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 02:05 PM

Hi all,

 

The nitrile powder free gloves we are using to handle food in our catering company is loose on someone's palm and tight on others. When it is loose, the tips of the gloves are getting chopped off along with the fruits and vegetables. When it is tight, the glove is simply getting torn on its own. Because of this, we have faced a few incidents when the cut pieces of the gloves have gone into the food.

 

Please suggest if there are any alternatives for the gloves.

 

P.S. we use blue colour nitrile powder free gloves for easy identification.



#2 The Food Scientist

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 02:48 PM

Perhaps the quality of those gloves are bad? Try sampling other vendors for gloves? 


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


#3 Hank Major

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 06:30 PM

Why not well-washed bare hands?



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#4 The Food Scientist

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 06:38 PM

Why not well-washed bare hands?

 

I agree! So many people from the food industry are against using bare hands. it's been said bare hands tend to be more hygienic than gloves. As long as you adopt a good hand washing program, along with GMPs, why not?


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


#5 wtheriot

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 07:52 PM

Ill take an excellent GMP program and handwashing over gloves any day! Not only are gloves a constant problem for Foreign Material...they have been shown to give staff a false sense of security and thereby increasing risk of cross contamination.



#6 kfromNE

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 08:36 PM

Hi all,

 

The nitrile powder free gloves we are using to handle food in our catering company is loose on someone's palm and tight on others. When it is loose, the tips of the gloves are getting chopped off along with the fruits and vegetables. When it is tight, the glove is simply getting torn on its own. Because of this, we have faced a few incidents when the cut pieces of the gloves have gone into the food.

 

Please suggest if there are any alternatives for the gloves.

 

P.S. we use blue colour nitrile powder free gloves for easy identification.

 

Not to state the obvious but are you ordering multiple different sizes. We use the same blue gloves but order 3 different sizes and have very few issues. I do agree with what is said above. If you're using tongs, spatula's, etc - then you could do away with gloves.



#7 shwethahanka

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Posted 04 November 2019 - 06:36 PM

Not to state the obvious but are you ordering multiple different sizes. We use the same blue gloves but order 3 different sizes and have very few issues. I do agree with what is said above. If you're using tongs, spatula's, etc - then you could do away with gloves.

We are not ordering multiple sizes. Comes only in one standard size.



#8 QAGB

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Posted 04 November 2019 - 07:52 PM

We are not ordering multiple sizes. Comes only in one standard size.

 

This seems odd. I've never seen a glove that only comes in 1 standard size. It sounds like you might need to look at other vendors in this case.



#9 Ryan M.

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Posted 04 November 2019 - 11:32 PM

You need different sizes.  Our company uses 4 different sizes and we rarely have problems with the gloves.  The only time we have problems is when we run out of a specific size and force the employees to use the wrong size.

 

Not sure about your region, but here in the states you can get a variety of different colored gloves, nitrile based, in a variety of grades / quality.

 

If you are skimping out on the glove quality that could be your problem as well.  A good quality glove will cost you more, but lead to less issues if you can get different sizes for your employees.



#10 GMO

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Posted 05 November 2019 - 06:47 AM

Hi all,

 

The nitrile powder free gloves we are using to handle food in our catering company is loose on someone's palm and tight on others. When it is loose, the tips of the gloves are getting chopped off along with the fruits and vegetables. When it is tight, the glove is simply getting torn on its own. Because of this, we have faced a few incidents when the cut pieces of the gloves have gone into the food.

 

Please suggest if there are any alternatives for the gloves.

 

P.S. we use blue colour nitrile powder free gloves for easy identification.

 

The gloves are available in 4 sizes.  Buy different ones.



#11 mahantesh.micro

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Posted 05 November 2019 - 10:12 AM

Hi,

You can either use different size hand gloves or ask employees to work bare hands with hand washing or dip hands in chlorine water at regular intervals.



#12 The Food Scientist

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Posted 05 November 2019 - 02:02 PM

I find it very odd you don't have different sizes. Get different sizes, or perhaps look up a better vendor that can provide you with better quality gloves that can withstand your cutting operations. If not, like everyone else said, have an extensive hand washing monitoring program for them to work with bare hands.


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


#13 mgourley

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Posted 05 November 2019 - 09:48 PM

In addition to multiple sizes, consider vinyl gloves. They are readily available and much cheaper than nitrile.

 

Marshall



#14 GMO

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 09:31 AM

dip hands in chlorine water at regular intervals.

 

That will have no benefit at all.  All it will do is irritate hands potentially resulting in dermatitis.  Chlorine or any of the oxidizing disinfectants are ineffective in the presence of soiling.  The best way is to wash hands.



#15 fepuhe

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 01:09 AM

Why not well-washed bare hands?

We need periodically verifiy that the well washed bare hands are hygienic by swab tests.

We will also need to enchance the awareness to wash bare hands when it is dirty, when they touched others which are not hygienic. In fact, it will be hard to control, unless you have a team with well known food safety culture.

 

Right, may be the quality is just bad. IMHO.



#16 fepuhe

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 01:12 AM

That will have no benefit at all.  All it will do is irritate hands potentially resulting in dermatitis.  Chlorine or any of the oxidizing disinfectants are ineffective in the presence of soiling.  The best way is to wash hands.

 

we used chlorine as an additional step when washing our hands.
And we do the checking / effectiveness test. It turns out that with 70% alcohol is enough.
Wash hands with detergent -> dry -> alcohol spray.
Clean at the start.
Chlorine must be replaced every 4 hours, to ensure that the concentration remains effective, and we need 1 person to replace it, measure the concentration.



#17 GMO

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 03:20 PM

we used chlorine as an additional step when washing our hands.
And we do the checking / effectiveness test. It turns out that with 70% alcohol is enough.
Wash hands with detergent -> dry -> alcohol spray.
Clean at the start.
Chlorine must be replaced every 4 hours, to ensure that the concentration remains effective, and we need 1 person to replace it, measure the concentration.

 

Effective cleaning is what you need.  If you want belt and braces, include a hand sanitiser afterwards which is designed for the purpose rather than using chlorine or very high alcohol concentrations.  Dermatitis is a real risk and can result in Staphylococcus aureus infection which can then become a food safety risk. 






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