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#1 The Food Scientist

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Posted 08 November 2019 - 09:16 PM

Hi everyone!

 

So i am redoing a new HACCP Plan for my company, the previous manager has made one but is really confusing and the way they grouped the products seems very odd that made inspectors a bit confused.  If anyone can suggest a way for me to group the products we have for the HA. I have a few ways but would like to hear everyone's suggestions :) These are the different products we have:

 

 

  1. Ground Spices
  2. Whole Spices
  3. Dried herbs
  4. Candies (some are allergens) (with secondary packaging, individually wrapped and placed into a bigger one bag)
  5. Candies (some are allergens) (no secondary packaging)
  6. Whole chili peppers (some have sulfite)
  7. Grains (Ex. Flax seeds)
  8. Seeds (Ex.Pumpkin)
  9. Treenuts
  10. Peanuts
  11. Food Ingredients (Bromelain, baking soda)
  12. Dried fruits (some have sulfite)
  13. Snacks (Most if not all are allergens).
  14. Redistributed product.
  15. Corn husks
  16. Ground Dry & Whole cooked shrimp
  17. Seasonings (Mixed and processed/more than 1 ingredient)
  18. Seasonings (Not mixed or processed/single ingredient)
  19. None-edible food grade material- Cal Hydroxide.

 

 

 

 


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


#2 Hank Major

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Posted 08 November 2019 - 09:48 PM

One way is to look at the products in terms of their flow charts. If a product goes through the same process steps and the same machines, you can group them. So if, for example, Whole Spices and Dried Herbs are handled exactly the same way throughout, except of course their labels, they can be grouped. Then ask, are the flax seeds and pumpkin seeds handled any differently from peppercorns and rosemary? No? Same group. You could also have a group for all non-allergen blends.

 

That said, each allergen must be separate. An auditor told me that there is a very definite hazard of contaminating, say, peanuts with treenuts, and that auditors look for that.  



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#3 GMO

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 08:25 AM

I would always go with a modular plan, so a plan based on your equipment and plant not the products you make. 

 

So for example, in one dairy I worked in, the previous HACCP manager had put in a plan for white cheese and a plan for red cheese even though they all went through the same pasteuriser (even though different vats were used).  So I did a flow and hazard analysis for the pasteuriser which was common to all of the cheese groups then had two different types of vat process but then came back together for packing. 

 

For your products I'm guessing there will be some common equipment.  I think a sure fire sign you need to go for a modular flow is the feeling that you're repeating yourself.  Are you finding you're doing that?



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#4 zanorias

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 09:54 AM

I agree with GMO on the equipment and process route and used something to that effect before for grouping a large number of products. I.e "cooked meat in gravy" rather than 12 separate plans.

 

I think often plans, and CCPs too, are set out with intentions of simplicity by making everything separate but in reality it ends up a whole load of unnecessary duplicates that complicates things.



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#5 The Food Scientist

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 01:51 PM

Thank you all! :) 


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.





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