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How can packing pouch damage happen during transportation? Root cause?

pouch damage product damage root cause for packing damage

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#1 mathivanan

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Posted 20 November 2019 - 11:25 AM

anyone guide me,how the packing damage occurs while during the transportation.

and please send the root cause of these problem.

Corrective action and preventive action?

 

 please find the attachment of the photos. 

 

Attached Files



#2 GMO

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Posted 20 November 2019 - 12:48 PM

This is where the fact I'm a Technical person who also worked in a small supermarket when I was 17 may help...

 

That looks to me like the packs are being damaged as the boxes are being opened.  So if someone is opening the case using a sharp knife, sometimes it cuts the product inside too.   The second picture is more unusual but first and third, I'd definitely suspect box opening.  If that sounds likely to you, some corrective action could be to put warnings on the boxes e.g. "do not open with knives as it damages product" and a preventive action could be redesigning your case so it's easier to open.  I'd make sure that is the root cause first though by visiting some sites opening your product (particularly where you have large complaints) and watch how people open the product.



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#3 Timwoodbag

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Posted 20 November 2019 - 02:37 PM

Do you pressure test those pouches?  That could just be where the weakest seam is.  How far is this stuff traveling // is it going on a plane?  



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#4 QAGB

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Posted 21 November 2019 - 03:18 PM

Both GMO and Timwoodbag have presented some likely scenarios.

 

I have seen instances of people cutting through boxes and cutting the actual product too by accident.

 

I have also seen instances of film breaking due to weak seam seals and/or film being too brittle for the type of handling required. Film can have its own sets of complexities. If you are the supplier of these products, and this happens a lot, you should take a look at your film and heat sealer settings. If you aren't the supplier, you may want to talk to your supplier about the packaging, or figuring out a better stacking method for shipment to prevent additional stress on the film. 

 

You can often tell a lot about a situation based on the location of damaged product on the pallet (assuming it is shipped that way). If you can give us a bit more detail/background on the situation, we may be able to look at the root cause a little better.



#5 CMHeywood

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 04:06 PM

The damage is not occuring in a seam area.

The pouches are not pressurized so likely no pressure testing.

Pressure burst is usually not a smooth, linear tear.

 

I also suspect that the pouches were cut when someone cut open the box.

 

So questions  to ask the person who received the product:

How many damaged pouches found in each box.

Was the damaged pouch near the top of the box?

Was the damaged pouch located where the box wax cut?

 

The root cause is likely a situation where the stock person cut too deeply into the box and is saying, "No, that's the way the pouches come in!"

 

Bart Simpson quote:

I didn't do it!

Nobody saw me!

You can't prove anything!



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#6 QAGB

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 05:00 PM

The damage is not occuring in a seam area.

The pouches are not pressurized so likely no pressure testing.

Pressure burst is usually not a smooth, linear tear.

 

I also suspect that the pouches were cut when someone cut open the box.

 

So questions  to ask the person who received the product:

How many damaged pouches found in each box.

Was the damaged pouch near the top of the box?

Was the damaged pouch located where the box wax cut?

 

The root cause is likely a situation where the stock person cut too deeply into the box and is saying, "No, that's the way the pouches come in!"

 

Bart Simpson quote:

I didn't do it!

Nobody saw me!

You can't prove anything!

 

 

When I looked at picture #1, it looked as though there was a seam that goes straight across the bag, and looked like potentially the bag was either cut, or the possible seam had a defect. Picture #2 looked like the damage was near the top of the bag and near a seam. Picture #3 doesn't look like the other 2, and would definitely think that was cut. The first two pictures are hard for me to visualize due to the digitized marking to remove logos. I can't really tell what is what.

 

We used to put product in sheets of film that were heat sealed together. This sealed bag would inevitably have a bit of air in it, which was flattened out by a pressing process before packing. I could see how a bag could have burst if this process didn't take place; especially if palletized with a large ti/hi.  In this case, picture #2 really seems like a candidate for this situation.

 

Hopefully the OP can get back to us with some additional info.



#7 CMHeywood

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 10:31 PM

The tear in pictures #1 and #3 do not have a seam running through them.  Picuture #2 shows a tear that appears to either start or stop at a seam.

 

I don't see any evidence of a seam failure.  In my opinion, the tears look more like something sharp caused them.  Pressure burst, if not at the seams is usually a ragged hole that shows stretching of the film.

 

I still think the tears are due to cutting too deep into the box.  The receiver of the product needs to provide more info on where the damaged pouches were located in the box.

 

If only one of two damaged pouches per box and pouches located near cutting lines, then I think this would be evidence of cutting too deep into the boxes.



#8 mahantesh.micro

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Posted 26 November 2019 - 04:44 AM

As everyone explained above may be the root cause.

If the packs are damaged while opening the box with knives then as a corrective action you can put a currogated plate above those packets before closing the flaps of carton box. This plate will avoid the cutting issue, Though it seams costly, it avoids loss due to pack damage.

 

Mahantesh 



#9 Timwoodbag

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Posted 26 November 2019 - 01:44 PM

As everyone explained above may be the root cause.

If the packs are damaged while opening the box with knives then as a corrective action you can put a currogated plate above those packets before closing the flaps of carton box. This plate will avoid the cutting issue, Though it seams costly, it avoids loss due to pack damage.

 

Mahantesh 

 

Or just use a box with bigger flaps, will cover the whole top like a plate.



#10 mahantesh.micro

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Posted 27 November 2019 - 04:36 AM

Or just use a box with bigger flaps, will cover the whole top like a plate.

 

This is also a good idea. Thanks Timwoodbag.



#11 zanorias

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Posted 27 November 2019 - 08:16 AM

The customer cutting too deep into the box and slicing some of the product does seem to be the most likely cause. However, it was probably caused by a member of staff on the customer end who wouldn't necessarily admit their error to their boss and may find it easier to say "nah they came in like that, must have happened during transportation" and hence the complaint arriving to you. Whilst it would be nice in theory to visit the store and catch this happening, unless it is a very frequent occurrence you may end up standing there all day and not witnessing an incorrect knife/method used, especially considering the staff will know whey are being observed.

 

In terms of solutions, the bigger flaps or a 'layer' would provide a better physical barrier against a knife, though I'm more inclined to put a cautionary statement on the box as GMO suggested. Not only would it communicate to staff that may be unaware of their error, but it would also help you defend the complaint if indeed the issue was caused by the customer opening the boxes without enough care. If feasible I'd look into getting a message put on the box such as below especially if this is a recurring incident. 

 

LZPLL05D_0.gif



#12 mahantesh.micro

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Posted 27 November 2019 - 09:11 AM

The customer cutting too deep into the box and slicing some of the product does seem to be the most likely cause. However, it was probably caused by a member of staff on the customer end who wouldn't necessarily admit their error to their boss and may find it easier to say "nah they came in like that, must have happened during transportation" and hence the complaint arriving to you. Whilst it would be nice in theory to visit the store and catch this happening, unless it is a very frequent occurrence you may end up standing there all day and not witnessing an incorrect knife/method used, especially considering the staff will know whey are being observed.

 

In terms of solutions, the bigger flaps or a 'layer' would provide a better physical barrier against a knife, though I'm more inclined to put a cautionary statement on the box as GMO suggested. Not only would it communicate to staff that may be unaware of their error, but it would also help you defend the complaint if indeed the issue was caused by the customer opening the boxes without enough care. If feasible I'd look into getting a message put on the box such as below especially if this is a recurring incident. 

 

LZPLL05D_0.gif

Putting cautionary sticker may not be effective as that of extended flap or corrugated plate coz some people wont even see that cautionary statement and some even after seeing the statement they use knife to open the box. In such case we cannot defend if we receive same complaint, coz the customer wont admit that he/she has used knife to cut open the box and they say that they have not used knife since there is a cautionary statement. 

 

Mahantesh 






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