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Abbreviating 2020 on documents might lead to fraud ?


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#1 Tomato Country Girl

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Posted 06 January 2020 - 02:55 PM

https://abcnews.go.c...ory?id=68054760

 

The above hyperlink is talking about not recording dates on legal documents as 20, eg such as 1/2/20.  They are suggesting to put 2020 due to someone being able to forge the document example: 1/2/20 could be forged as 1/2/2019.  We are thinking about creating a policy for this would like to get thoughts.

 

Regards,
Susan

 



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#2 The Food Scientist

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Posted 06 January 2020 - 03:09 PM

How is 20 going to be forged into 2019? More importantly is putting zeros in front of single value numbers like 01/02/20. So nobody can falsify the 1 and 2 into another number. But I dont see how the 20 in 2020 could be falsified? But to stay on the safe side the best practice would be writing it as 01/02/2020 and don't forget initials!


Edited by The Food Scientist, 06 January 2020 - 03:09 PM.

Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


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#3 djammur

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Posted 06 January 2020 - 03:11 PM

2020 is very easily falsified.  Since the issue is real, look up Good Documentation Practices.  That will give you a guideline as to dating documents.

 



#4 JWert

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Posted 06 January 2020 - 03:29 PM

Just wondering how much of an issue this really is - how is it different from recording 12-31-19?  Digits could have been added to the end for the past year, just not certain it constitutes a security risk. 


Edited by JWert, 06 January 2020 - 03:30 PM.


#5 The Food Scientist

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Posted 06 January 2020 - 03:37 PM

Just wondering how much of an issue this really is - how is it different from recording 12-31-19?  Digits could have been added to the end for the past year, just not certain it constitutes a security risk. 

 

For example when you want to investigate a root cause you need to go back to the date on the document and it should be accurate to properly solve the issue. Dating documents accurately is highly important.


Edited by The Food Scientist, 06 January 2020 - 03:37 PM.

Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


#6 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 06 January 2020 - 06:25 PM

I mean, I see the point and in a strict doc control environment that could be an issue.

 

BUt for the example above, it would also need to be advantageous to make the correction the same date in 2019.

 

Definitely seems like one of those things where if we were talking about software vulnerabilities could be significant, but in terms of documentation...I mean people send fake stuff all the time and we have no way of knowing it's fake, look at the PCA and other companies forging microbial CoA's, that stuff happens no matter what. Focusing on things like this are just security theater.


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#7 Hank Major

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Posted 08 January 2020 - 08:32 PM

Why would one want to make food or a microbial test appear older than it really is?



#8 The Food Scientist

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Posted 08 January 2020 - 08:55 PM

Why would one want to make food or a microbial test appear older than it really is?

 

Oh that happens way more than you know. If they get a shipment with salmonella lets say and test it and coming back positive, many companies would falsify and say oh it's an old shipment! This new one is clean, and get the clean one and date it as if its new. So many companies have been caught doing that and are and have faced charges.


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.





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