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Industry standards for the meat/poultry industry in terms of particle size limits in metal detection?

metal detection poultry processing

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#1 maryaparks

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Posted 08 July 2020 - 04:13 PM

We are in process of getting quotes for a metal detector to use in our processing of raw poultry - whole, parts, and ground.  The FDA guideline for hard/sharp objects is that 7.0-25.0 mm constitutes the hazardous size range, but each manufacturer must determine the hazard limits for their products, depending on the type of product and how it is to be handled by the end user, if I am reading it correctly.  

My question is this : are there certain accepted industry standards for the meat/poultry industry in terms of particle size limits in metal detection?



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 08 July 2020 - 06:04 PM

We are in process of getting quotes for a metal detector to use in our processing of raw poultry - whole, parts, and ground.  The FDA guideline for hard/sharp objects is that 7.0-25.0 mm constitutes the hazardous size range, but each manufacturer must determine the hazard limits for their products, depending on the type of product and how it is to be handled by the end user, if I am reading it correctly.  

My question is this : are there certain accepted industry standards for the meat/poultry industry in terms of particle size limits in metal detection?

Hi Mary,

 

This general topic is one which has probably generated more argumentative forum threads  than any other. :smile:

 

I'm not in USA or the meat/poultry business so other directly associated users are welcome to correct the folllowing.

 

afaik, USDA (via FSIS) are the Regulatory Body for Meat and Poultry..

 

Based on the 1st attached (2019) file below, FSIS appear (for raw ground beef patties production) to require metal detectors (MDs) which are "nominally" sensitive enough to detect a 2mm "metal" test sample.

 

I say "nominally" since this datum is specifically mentioned against the MD step in flowchart however an earlier "example" in same file requires monitoring using "most sensitive detection technique available" and a  methodology adequate to detect "contamination as small as  0.8 mm". I suspect the latter value is referenced from an earlier, now updated,  FSIS publication since the 0.8mm value no longer exists in the 2018 revision (see 2nd file below).

 

Third file below  is the (foreign material)  FSIS inspection directive (2003) whose text looks supportive of the format of the 2mm datum. (Not sure if this 2003 revision is still current.)(there is some extremely careful/subtle English wording in this document as to what may constitute a hazard  :smile: )

 

Attached File  USDA haccp verification.pdf   1.12MB   5 downloads

Attached File  FSIS Meat_and_Poultry_Hazards_Controls_Guide_2018.pdf   900.71KB   3 downloads

Attached File  FSIS Directive 7310.5,2003 - Presence of foreign material.pdf   108.61KB   3 downloads

 

PS - it is conceivable that the 2mm value varies with the specific meat Product haccp plan. Note also that the "2mm" does not identify whether Ferrous/Non-ferrous/SS. Offhand, IMEX metal detectors are usually capable of detecting 2mm Ferrous in various food matrices but frequently not 2mm SS.

 

PPS - a difficulty with the often quoted >7mm hazardous rule is that even if the product passes this, subsequent discovery of levels <7mm is still likely to result in a recall due to "adulteration". This is in lime with the FDA principle that metal contamination > zero is not acceptable.

 

P3S - JFI this USDA communication in 2010 required (raw beef patties) a MD sensitivity of at least 0.8mm. Probably in line with the value discussed above.

Attached File  USDA HACCPValidationLetters-3-19-2010.pdf   653.95KB   4 downloads


Edited by Charles.C, 09 July 2020 - 02:51 AM.
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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 maryaparks

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Posted 08 July 2020 - 08:47 PM

Perfect-thank you so much!



#4 billbrochin

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 03:32 PM

material below 7 mm or above the 25 mm cut off are not considered a choking hazard.  In case you didn't know, you should not not make metal detection a CCP.  Most companies have gone away from the CCP route.  Just make it a routine check.  As far as size, I would write the procedure to match the capability of the equipment you have.  Good luck.







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