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What risks and controls do you have defined in your coffee roasting facility?

coffee roasting packaging

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#1 esha7

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Posted 14 October 2020 - 02:56 PM

Hello All.

I am currently working as PCQI / FSMA compliance in a large sized coffee roasting facility.

I am curious as to what risks and controls you have defined in your coffee roasting facilty. (HAACP)

 

With the data we have accumalated overtime, and the articles I have come across, 

I'm having a hard time justifying the risk is high enough to define controls in our plan.

 

 

Currently we do moisture analysis on arrival to port, and roasting facility. (Mycotoxins)

Magnets throughout the process which are checked for strength with a Pull Test Kit. (Foreign Material)

Shaker Cleaning System that screens out raw coffee, separating debris. (Foreign Material)

The (kill step) of roasting coffee. (Mycotoxin/Microbial Reduction)

Pressure Checks of sealed bags of coffee. To ensure a tight seal. (Foreign Material/Pathogens)

 

Thanks for your time.

 

-Evan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



#2 Ryan M.

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Posted 14 October 2020 - 07:38 PM

I would think controlling acrylamide that develops during the roasting process should be part of your plan.



#3 SpankyK

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Posted 14 October 2020 - 09:26 PM

I would think controlling acrylamide that develops during the roasting process should be part of your plan.

If you are selling to anyone in California acrylamide is a Proposition 65 listed chemical and it has to be addressed. 

Also I'm pretty sure mycotoxins are not affected by heating.



#4 Ryan M.

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Posted 15 October 2020 - 12:37 PM

Yes and yes on the mycotoxins; heat has little affect.

 

If you are selling to anyone in California acrylamide is a Proposition 65 listed chemical and it has to be addressed. 

Also I'm pretty sure mycotoxins are not affected by heating.



#5 Ted S

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Posted 15 October 2020 - 06:42 PM

In addition to what has been mentioned so far, what has been done to evaluate the potential chemical risks associated with growing coffee beans? How are you managing the use of pesticides, etc... especially since you are probably buying beans from various sources? I worked for a company that purchased vanilla beans and for every lot of beans that we received, we would run gas chromatography vs virgin sample to ID any chemical contaminants. I would expect that coffee beans should be managed in the same manner. 

 

In addition, and since you have been through FSMA training, has your roasting process been "validated" to confirm that your roast step does provide the lethality that you expect? Are the roasting controls (time/temp/agitation speed, etc...) identified as CCP's/PRP's in your Food Safety Plan? Finally, how have your coffee bean suppliers been approved? Do you have audit reports on file for these suppliers and have their controls for growing/harvesting beans been audited and are they compliant with your companies requirements as identified in your supplier approval process? 







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