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Gum after deguming in vegetable oil production is an allergen?

#allergen#soybeanoil lecithin phospholipid

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nha nguyen

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Posted 15 December 2020 - 09:02 AM

Hi everyone, my company is producing soybean oil. in which by-product is Gum of soybean with main ingredient is phospholipid. It is used to produce lecithin as I found out there were traces of soy protein in lecithin. So for Gum separated, do we have to manage as a substance with allergenic ingredients present in the factory?

 


pHruit

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Posted 15 December 2020 - 11:36 AM

If you aren't able to validate that the process by which the gum is made will remove all of the soya protein elements, then yes you should treat it as an allergen containing soy.

It's not clear where you're based or where you're selling the product, but for EU and I believe also for US purposes, soybean only ceases to become an allergen if processed into a fully refined oil/fat form.



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nha nguyen

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Posted 16 December 2020 - 04:26 AM

If you aren't able to validate that the process by which the gum is made will remove all of the soya protein elements, then yes you should treat it as an allergen containing soy.

It's not clear where you're based or where you're selling the product, but for EU and I believe also for US purposes, soybean only ceases to become an allergen if processed into a fully refined oil/fat form.

thanks you so much



SQFconsultant

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 06:55 PM

You need to look for the threshold standard for the oil and send out samples to a lab for allergen properties.

 

If you are under the threshold you are not treating it as an allergen and that is what one of our clients has done.

 

The traces were extremely low and thus the level did not qualify on an allergen.

 

They do however conduct routine testing to ensure that position.


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Charles.C

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 07:53 PM

You need to look for the threshold standard for the oil and send out samples to a lab for allergen properties.

 

If you are under the threshold you are not treating it as an allergen and that is what one of our clients has done.

 

The traces were extremely low and thus the level did not qualify on an allergen.

 

They do however conduct routine testing to ensure that position.

 

afaik threshold standards only exist for a very few locations ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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