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Allergen Protein Denature in Frying Oil ?


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shahid.iqbal

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Posted 01 February 2021 - 08:01 AM

Dear Colleagues. Allergen protein denaturing in frying oil @ 180 to 190 Celsius? We have done ELISA testing of oil after frying allergen which our site deal currently (Crustaceans, Eggs, Mustard, Gluten, Soya, SO2, Milk, and Celery). Nothing detected in oil. Studies reveal some mix point of view. Deep oil frying is aggressive which easily denature allergen protein and some said NO. I am very confused on this at the moment. I appreciate if we have your expert advice and any literature which help us to guide idealistic and commercial approach to come over this long lasting issue faced in operation. Thanking you in advance. Shahid

 



Charles.C

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Posted 01 February 2021 - 08:20 AM

Dear Colleagues,

 

 

  1. Allergen protein denaturing in frying oil @ 180 to 190 Celsius???
  2. We have done ELISA testing of oil after frying allergen which our site deal currently (Crustaceans, Eggs, Mustard, Gluten, Soya, SO2, Milk, and Celery). Nothing detected in oil.
  3. Studies reveal some mix point of view. Deep oil frying is aggressive which easily denature allergen protein and some said NO. I am very confused on this at the moment.

 

I appreciate if we have your expert advice and any literature which help us to guide idealistic and commercial approach to come over this long lasting issue faced in operation.

 

Thanking you in advance.

 

Shahid

 

Hi Shahid,

 

A little Context may assist.

 

Product Type = ? eg frozen breaded shrimp.

RTE = ?

Process = ? eg output = RTE/NRTE

 

Time in oil = ?

Core temperature of input = ?

Core temperature of output = ?

 

Can you inform what Literature you have already scanned ?

 

Offhand, if output is not (internally/externally) "significantly" changed (eg temperature), same will presumably apply from  allergen POV.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Scampi

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Posted 01 February 2021 - 01:10 PM

Are you asking if the oil the foods are cooked in becomes a cross contamination issue?


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Charles.C

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Posted 01 February 2021 - 02:08 PM

Are you asking if the oil the foods are cooked in becomes a cross contamination issue?

 

Hi Scampi,

 

Excellent spot. I think I misunderstood the request.

 

From a quick look, the literature (including UK-FSA) seems to support the possibility of cross-contamination.

 

A similar query was previously posted here -

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...on/#entry114776

 

From the literature -

 

https://www.food.gov...food-businesses

https://home.allergi...-contamination/

https://www.menutrin...gy-myth-busters

https://www.valentin...amination-risk/

(twin tank system to avoid cross-contamination)

https://www.healthce...rying-oil-foods

 

 Oils used for cooking  allergenic  foods  (for  example,  shellfish,  fish and breaded or battered products) should not be used subsequently for cooking products not containing that allergen without undergoing a validated filtration step.

Attached File  Guidance_on_Food_Allergen_Management,2013.pdf   3.6MB   10 downloads

 

 

Attached File  frying oil allergen cross-contamination.PNG   20.87KB   0 downloads

Attached File  Food allergen control for caterers.pdf   670.95KB   7 downloads

 

 

@Shahid - regarding yr comment on "mixed" POV, can you give a link/reference to any contrarian opinion ?


Edited by Charles.C, 01 February 2021 - 02:44 PM.
added

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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shahid.iqbal

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Posted 02 February 2021 - 10:44 AM

Hi Shahid,

 

A little Context may assist.

 

Product Type = ? eg frozen breaded shrimp.

RTE = ?

Process = ? eg output = RTE/NRTE

 

Time in oil = ?

Core temperature of input = ?

Core temperature of output = ?

 

Can you inform what Literature you have already scanned ?

 

Offhand, if output is not (internally/externally) "significantly" changed (eg temperature), same will presumably apply from  allergen POV.

 

Dear Charles, Thanks for your response.

Raw Prawn cracker pellets which frying on temperature 180 Celsius

Ready to Eat after frying. 

 

Core temperature???



Scampi

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Posted 02 February 2021 - 02:06 PM

See my previous post  #3    we still need an answer on that to be able to help


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Charles.C

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Posted 02 February 2021 - 02:12 PM

Dear Charles, Thanks for your response.

Raw Prawn cracker pellets which frying on temperature 180 Celsius

Ready to Eat after frying. 

 

Core temperature???

 

Hi shahid,

 

As indicated in previous posts, I probably misunderstood yr OP in which case the temperature queries in Post 2 are redundant and yr OP is meaningfully addressed in Post 4.

 

If otherwise, eg Post 6, please revert.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


shahid.iqbal

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Posted 05 February 2021 - 02:13 PM

Are you asking if the oil the foods are cooked in becomes a cross contamination issue?

Hi Scampi,

 

Yes, I am this is what my question. Product contain Allergen X frying in oil will contaminate oil @ 180 to 190 Celsius temperature and can affect to other product frying in same oil???

 

thanks.

 

Shahid



shahid.iqbal

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Posted 05 February 2021 - 02:16 PM

Hi Shahid,

 

A little Context may assist.

 

Product Type = ? eg frozen breaded shrimp.

RTE = ?

Process = ? eg output = RTE/NRTE

 

Time in oil = ?

Core temperature of input = ?

Core temperature of output = ?

 

Can you inform what Literature you have already scanned ?

 

Offhand, if output is not (internally/externally) "significantly" changed (eg temperature), same will presumably apply from  allergen POV.

 

Dear Charles,

 

Don't know input or out put temperature. frying temperature set is 185 Celsiu.

 

Cooking time is 3 minutes.

 

Fried product ready to eat.

 

Many regards,

 

Shahid 



Scampi

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Posted 05 February 2021 - 02:26 PM

My quick search also said, yes cross contamination can occur and that the time/temp used for deep frying aren't enough for CONSISTENT degradation of the proteins.

 

Where allergens are concerned, err on the side of caution

 

Food allergens are usually water-soluble glycoproteins ranging from 10 to 60 kD Sampson (1997). These proteins are resistant to heat, acid and proteolytic degradation Sampson and Metcalfe (1992).


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moskito

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Posted 05 February 2021 - 02:31 PM

Hi Shahid,

 

IMO an antibody based detection system is not able to give answers on allerginicity. Heat treatment will modify the protein structure and the epitopes where antibodies dock. No detection can mean no docking of the antibody to the modified surface only.

The question is how the antibodies have been generated? Mono- or polyclonal? Towards a single protein or mixture of proteins? Processed proteins?
Nevertheless - detection does not give an answer regarding allergenicity.

I have made similar experience with peanut allergen prior and post backing. In these times I was in discussion with EU bodies on these points (e.g. validation of tests). They have done some test setup with IgG fromblood of an allergenic person - biscuit create allergenic reaction post baking where several commercial tests have created negative results.
Another example: Rene Crevel reported on an enzymatic cleavage of milk protein expecting "destruction" of allergenicity. The opposite was the case.

Again: Detectablity by commercial test gives no clear indication on allergenicity if proteins are modified by (harsh) treatment.

Rgds

moskito



Charles.C

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Posted 05 February 2021 - 06:38 PM

As per previous posts and queried in the OP, the topic of  "denaturing" allergenic capability is complex. The following quotes are maybe illustrative -

 

From my previous 2013 attachment  -

Because  allergic  reactions  start  with  the  recognition of the allergen (protein), any process that modifies the structure  of  a  protein  will  have  the  potential  to  affect allergenicity. Food processing induces several physical, chemical and biochemical changes that are known to potentially  impact  the  allergenic  potential  of  proteins. Certain  methods  of  food  processing  may  enhance, reduce, or eliminate the allergenic potential of a food (9).
Removal  of  the  protein  fraction  of  the  food  can reduce  exposure  to  allergens  sufficiently  to  prevent allergic reactions (e.g. highly refined seed oils).  This
is  recognised  by  the  exemptions  granted  in  the labelling  legislation.  However,  there  are  no  general rules regarding how different allergenic foods respond
to  physical  (i.e.,  thermal,  mechanical),  chemical,  or biochemical  processing  methods.  Consequently, unless sound evidence exists that a specific processing
method reduces allergenicity, it should be assumed that the allergenic potential of a processed food is identical to that of the food in its unprocessed form.

 

 

From a 2016 study on peanut processing -

These results indicate that although there is a decreased amount of some peanut allergens or the allergens are altered in boiled/fried peanuts, peanuts processed in this manner remain likely to trigger allergic responses from most peanut allergic individuals.
.........................................................................................................................
We must emphasize that exposure to minute quantities of allergen can cause severe reactions in some peanut allergic individuals. In one carefully controlled study, the minimal dose to elicit a reaction to peanut was experimentally determined as 100μg of peanut protein confirming a threshold value that had been previously reported [42,43]. In another study, the minimal dose to elicit symptoms was found to be 10mg of peanut protein [44]. Thus, if even small amounts of allergens remain in the boiled/fried peanuts, the peanuts cannot be considered hypoallergenic.
 

Attached File  Boiling and frying peanuts,2016.pdf   6.39MB   2 downloads

 

And this 2019 quote -

The first hurdle for a food allergen is the food manufacturing process. Many nuts are roasted prior to consumption. For most foods, heating changes the structure of proteins in a way that destroys the parts that trigger an immune response. This makes them far less potent as allergens.

This is not the case for many tree nuts: allergens in almonds, cashews and hazelnuts survived roasting with no loss of potency.

And for the major peanut allergens, it’s even worse. Roasting actually makes them more potent.

https://theconversat...eactions-127120

 

I assume references like the above underpin the multitude of qualitatively conservative links similar to those compiled in my Post 4.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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