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Cleaning Matrix For Change Over Process


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#1 sarahlee

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Posted 03 February 2021 - 11:01 PM

Hi, I am currently working in an infant milk manufacturing site that specializes in production of goat milk infant formula.

However, the business is looking into making cow milk. Can anyone share ideas on what to put into developing a cleaning matrix for change over process from goat - cow milk. Your response and feedbacks will be greatly appreciated. Regards,



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 03 February 2021 - 11:39 PM

Hi,

 

Am currently working in an infant milk manufacturing site that specializes in production of goat milk infant formula.

However, the business is looking into making cow milk.

Can anyone share ideas on what to put into developing a cleaning matrix for change over process from goat - cow milk.

Your response and feedbacks will be greatly appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

So what allergens are involved before/after change over ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#3 sarahlee

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Posted 04 February 2021 - 12:42 AM

So what allergens are involved before/after change over ?

 

Hi Charles,

Lactose is the allergen. It could be before or after, this would be based on the production schedule.



#4 Charles.C

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Posted 04 February 2021 - 01:40 AM

Hi Charles,

Lactose is the allergen. It could be before or after, this would be based on the production schedule.

 

I only asked to make sure only one allergen, otherwise it gets more complicated.

 

Not my area but I guess any differences may relate to the individual target characteristics/specifications/flow charts.

 

Hopefully some goat experts here.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#5 Scampi

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Posted 04 February 2021 - 01:18 PM

So generally speaking, if you're going to do a mid-run change over the goat milk MUST be run first otherwise you have to put all of the goat based formula on hold pending test results.

 

Otherwise, perform the normal sanitation procedure after cows milk and then swab in the hard to clean areas with something like this

https://jornades.uab...lus_English.pdf

 

I wouldn't think you'd need to do anything else......................I would hypothesize that  this change over will always require a full clean, and not simply rinse and sanitize between types

 

Ideally, you would want to run Mon-Thurs with goat based products and then a full clean and swab for Friday production with cows milk

 

Hope that's helpful


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#6 Evans X.

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Posted 10 February 2021 - 11:00 AM

Greetings,

 

Having a long experience in dairy manufacturing, I think that there has been some overthinking on the question asked! Milk (be it cow or goat or sheep) is pretty much the same, with variations on some of each main ingredients/chem properties (eg fat, freezing point etc.). The same hazards applied to goat milk, like pathogens, presence of antibiotics, allergens etc also apply to cow milk. So the only thing you have to do, after having tested your raw ingredient and found it compliant to be inserted in your processes, is the same cleaning as you do for day-to-day production. If you have a CIP system it's even easier.

As Scampi mentioned the best approach would be to split your production in differnet days for each type of milk, but it's more for ease of practice.

Having said that, you should of course perform cleaning/sanitation checks as always.

 

To take it one (or a 100 imo) step further, it would be a more valuable information to you if you run a few tests -after changing from goat to cow and vice-versa- to check the possibility of residual type of milk in a product that it shouldn't be there, through a bovino or carpino kit (https://www.zeulab.c...ions/ic-bovino/ and i have to state I am not a seller or have any affiliations with the company), which finds application in milk and cheese products. Can't safely assume it will work for you as i don't know exactly your product.

 

Hope it helps.

Kind regards!


Edited by Evans Xen, 10 February 2021 - 11:03 AM.


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#7 Ryan M.

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Posted 10 February 2021 - 02:41 PM

Dairy and goat milk guy here....previous facility ran both cow and goat milks / dairy.  There is no difference in terms of allergens, including lactose.  The main difference is the sensory aspect, taste.  Goat milk has a VERY pronounced taste to it compared to cow milk.

 

I would identify a plan to keep them separate in your process with a changeover because of your intended consumers.  Some infants are more susceptible to upset stomachs with cow milk versus goat milk; purely a digestive issue (not allergen).  I wouldn't think of this as a food safety issue, but a quality issue.

 

I don't know your process so you will have to come up with the proper changeover and cleaning matrix for the two types of products.  I would advise you involve your team from operations, sanitation, etc to develop the changeover / cleaning matrix.  Then validate, and setup verification plan for it to ensure it continues to be followed.



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#8 sarahlee

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Posted 11 February 2021 - 02:59 AM

Greetings,

 

Having a long experience in dairy manufacturing, I think that there has been some overthinking on the question asked! Milk (be it cow or goat or sheep) is pretty much the same, with variations on some of each main ingredients/chem properties (eg fat, freezing point etc.). The same hazards applied to goat milk, like pathogens, presence of antibiotics, allergens etc also apply to cow milk. So the only thing you have to do, after having tested your raw ingredient and found it compliant to be inserted in your processes, is the same cleaning as you do for day-to-day production. If you have a CIP system it's even easier.

As Scampi mentioned the best approach would be to split your production in differnet days for each type of milk, but it's more for ease of practice.

Having said that, you should of course perform cleaning/sanitation checks as always.

 

To take it one (or a 100 imo) step further, it would be a more valuable information to you if you run a few tests -after changing from goat to cow and vice-versa- to check the possibility of residual type of milk in a product that it shouldn't be there, through a bovino or carpino kit (https://www.zeulab.c...ions/ic-bovino/ and i have to state I am not a seller or have any affiliations with the company), which finds application in milk and cheese products. Can't safely assume it will work for you as i don't know exactly your product.

 

Hope it helps.

Kind regards!

 

Very helpful!! Thank you for your input.






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