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Bench top or portable meter to measure the fat content of cream


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chris ciarcia

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 02:43 PM

I am looking for any guidance as to where I can find either a bench top or portable meter to measure the fat content of cream. Any help

would be greatly appreciated. Thank you, Chris. 



SQFconsultant

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 03:16 PM

Depends on method, let's take Gerber method for instance --

 

here's a place to get started, just maybe not the place you are going to buy it from ---

 

https://chadhasales....ting-equipment/


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chris ciarcia

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 04:09 PM

Thank you Glenn



kingstudruler1

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 04:14 PM

Im not sure what you are tryign to accomplish.   milk processors typically use a gerber, babcock, or 

FTIR method for fat determination.   


I think you are looking for more of a rapid method.   CEM, Foss, Bruker, and others have instruments designed for dairy applications.   Nelson jameson supplies instruments and the manual methods.  

 

https://nelsonjameson.com/



olenazh

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 05:05 PM

We use CEM machine, and it's just amazing! It's expensive, yes, but it costs every cent spent on it, honestly. And it's very precise, much more accurate than lab methods like babcock. Highly recommend CEM.



Ryan M.

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Posted 04 August 2021 - 05:47 PM

At a previous company we purchased a used CEM smart trac.  It worked excellent for a variety of dairy and non-dairy products for fat and total solids.  The key is putting in the money and time to get a great calibration curve and method.  Once you have the calibration set it does not need any maintenance or re-calibration.  It is a very stable instrument.  Check out the links below.  This is the company we purchased it from.  They have great prices, awesome service (they go everywhere), and they also sell all the supplies you need.

 

https://lissci.com/p...sture-analyzer/

 

https://lissci.com/



chris ciarcia

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Posted 04 August 2021 - 05:54 PM

Thank you all I had the CEM rep in yesterday for a demo on there machine 

 

Chris 



Ryan M.

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Posted 04 August 2021 - 08:10 PM

Thank you all I had the CEM rep in yesterday for a demo on there machine 

 

Chris 

 

We did the same thing, but ultimately went with the company I had in my link.  Why? Because we could save $30,000 on the instrument buying used versus new.






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