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Standard Operating Procedures Chemical burn treatment Instructions

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Gshurtleff

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 06:58 PM

Hello all, I am writing Standard Operating Procedure for Chemical Exposure to Skin and I am unsure about an item in the "instruction" section. When it comes to the area where I describe flushing the chemical off of the skin for a minimum 10 minutes, can the flushing itself be done in the hand washing sink or does it need to be in a separate, designated sink. I wonder only because I am listing the materials needed in the SOP and I originally thought to list "hand washing sink" as one of them then thought I might me wrong. Thank you so much for the exemplary expertise. Y'all have been, and continue to be, a much needed and appreciated guidance. Graham S.



olenazh

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 07:48 PM

We've been using hand wash sinks updated with eyewash tubes (or whatever they're called). The most important - follow MSD of the chemicals.



TimG

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 08:11 PM

Typically if someone gets a chemical on their skin that they shouldn't (hydrochloric, sulfuric, etc.) it can be considered an emergency situation and it should be the closest clean flowing water source.

 

If you have sufficient quantities of these hazardous chemicals (or sufficient risk of large accidental exposure), you might want to look into safety shower/eyewash combos. Safety showers are designed to be used for skin flushing. OSHA has regulations as to how close these need to be from areas of possible 'accidental exposure.' I want to say it's <10 seconds and somewhere like 50-60 feet. 



johnmcip

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 08:18 PM

You're close Tim, but OSHA won't let us get away with something that reasonable.

OSHA requires a shower within 10 feet. Strictly speaking, that mean a 20 ft square room needs two showers on opposing ends.

 

OSHA Guidance from 1996

 

 

OSHA interprets the phrase "within the work area" to require that eye/face wash units and emergency deluge showers both be located within 10 feet of unimpeded travel distance from the corrosive material hazard or, in the alternative, within the distance recommended by a physician or appropriate official the employer consulted.

 

In my opinion, when you make a rule that stringent people are going to be even less likely to comply. If we're going to be non-conforming, why even try?


Edited by johnmcip, 10 August 2021 - 08:18 PM.


SQFconsultant

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 08:19 PM

Most of our client have specific flush down hosing systems near the chemical area - also where the first aid kits are.

 

I doubt that a non-dedicated hand sink will pass muster.


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TimG

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 08:36 PM

You're close Tim, but OSHA won't let us get away with something that reasonable.

OSHA requires a shower within 10 feet. Strictly speaking, that mean a 20 ft square room needs two showers on opposing ends.

 

OSHA Guidance from 1996

 

 

In my opinion, when you make a rule that stringent people are going to be even less likely to comply. If we're going to be non-conforming, why even try?

 

I think that it actually gets even  more convoluted than that, if you can believe it. ANSI Z358.1 is held as standard by some states, and not by others.

ANSI z358.1 is where my brain got the 10seconds, 55 feet.

 

Best bet, get your compliance manager involved and make sure you meet your state requirements.



johnmcip

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 08:39 PM

I think that it actually gets even  more convoluted than that, if you can believe it. ANSI Z358.1 is held as standard by some states, and not by others.

ANSI z358.1 is where my brain got the 10seconds, 55 feet.

 

Best bet, get your compliance manager involved and make sure you meet your state requirements.

 

My state is much more difficult. We took out all our machinery and just put in showers. Our insurance rates plummeted, but we're having a hard time turning those lower costs into higher profit.



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Posted 12 August 2021 - 02:18 AM

Follow the MSDS for each chemical. Have current copies for chemical handellers within reach.

 

whilst the following scenarios may not be possible with the chemicals you currently have on-site or the quantity exposed during a spill. It is best practice not to apply blanket safety procedures. 

 

Hydrides (e.g., sodium hydride) with water. May form flammable hydrogen gas.

Phosphides (e.g., sodium phosphide) with water. May form highly toxic phosphine gas.

Alkali metals (e.g., sodium, potassium) with water. May form flammable hydrogen gas.

 







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