Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Moving pest control in-house


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

DannyO

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 4 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 17 September 2021 - 01:20 PM

I work for a food co-pack that uses a 3rd party for our pest control. I was talking with the technician that services our account and he told me that he is looking to make a career change.

 

We pay around $40K/year on their services and we are also looking for a sanitation manager. I am thinking about killing two birds and bring him on as the sanitation manager. He would then also be our in-house pest control tech. 

 

Aside from needing to create new internal forms, updating SOPs, etc., is there anything else that needs to be considered when moving to handle pest control internally? 

 

Thanks!



TylerJones

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 67 posts
  • 22 thanks
42
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male

Posted 17 September 2021 - 01:33 PM

DOsowski

 

A few things I would note: Make sure the tech can carry over his license if you are using restricted use pesticides (mainly 2nd generation anticoagulants). If you are you will need a pesticide storage area that can be locked, control of labels and a current inventory, spill kit for liquid applications- this is for both SQF and BRC codes. Also I'd check with the pest company you are using to see if you already paid for the equipment at your plant, if so your initial buy in will be insignificant. Usually techs trend amount of pesticides they use so that 40k is for both services and supplying of chemicals to use. Even with all that I strongly believe a in-house tech is the way to go and you can baby problem areas a lot quicker. Lastly he will need to do CE courses to keep current, easy enough on line and only a few hundred bucks every few years. 


If you don't like change, you're going to like becoming irrelevant less. 


olenazh

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 851 posts
  • 255 thanks
245
Excellent

  • Canada
    Canada
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Toronto
  • Interests:My job, church, reading, gym, horror movies

Posted 17 September 2021 - 01:55 PM

What about liability insurance? Pest control service provider must have one, as far as I was told. So, your in-house tech should get that insurance as well - and, AFAIK, it's quite expensive.



DannyO

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 4 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 17 September 2021 - 02:00 PM

Thanks for the response Tyler.

 

We do own the equipment. I didn't think about the chemicals being a part of the total cost we have paid. I will take a look at what they have applied and get an estimate of those costs.  

 

You're last comment is really why I want to bring him in house. We had a couple pest concerns this last year. We identified the root cause but it would be good to have someone who could focus on maintaining our corrective actions. 

 

Thanks again. 



DannyO

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 4 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 17 September 2021 - 02:02 PM

What about liability insurance? Pest control service provider must have one, as far as I was told. So, your in-house tech should get that insurance as well - and, AFAIK, it's quite expensive.

 

That was the big thing I was wondering about.

 

Our company has $5MM liability insurance being a co-packer. Would that also apply to this? 



TylerJones

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 67 posts
  • 22 thanks
42
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male

Posted 17 September 2021 - 02:08 PM

Id talk to your insurance company. Ive done our inhouse for a while and it didnt seem to be an issue and I was using Phosphine Gas and multiple other liquid chemicals. I feel that even if it cost more per year having an in house guy is beyond worth it.


If you don't like change, you're going to like becoming irrelevant less. 


TimG

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 641 posts
  • 185 thanks
305
Excellent

  • United States
    United States

Posted 17 September 2021 - 02:09 PM

There are going to be state regulated requirements for any applications of pesticides. Make sure you review those thoroughly for your area and add any annual requirements to your regulatory lists.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users