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Soft Drinks - Pasteurisation Time/Temp (PU's)


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ckom

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Posted 13 December 2021 - 04:20 PM

We are developing a new soft drink.  It will not be carbonated and will have a pH of <3.5.

 

We will be producing this in house and wondering if there are guidelines for the time/temperature we should be pasteurising at?  We will be pasteursing in bottle using a large water bath.

 

We will be using a pasteurising computer that lets us input the z value, tref, pu's etc.

 

Anyone know of any guidelines/standards?



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Posted 13 December 2021 - 05:03 PM

Here is a place to start

Canning high-acid foods

Examples of high-acid foods include jams and jellies, pickles, and most fruits. Because there is no fear of Clostridium botulinum growth, these foods require much less heating than low-acid foods. To be safe, such foods need only to reach pasteurization temperatures. For foods with a pH value of 3.5 or less, 175°F (79.5°C) is a sufficient pasteurization temperature. Those foods with a pH range between 3.5 and 4.0 have a recommended pasteurization temperature of 185°F (85°C). For foods with a pH range of 4.0 to 4.3, the recommended pasteurization temperature rises to 195°F (90.5°C). Foods with a pH value between 4.3 and 4.5 have a recommended pasteurization temperature of 210°F (99°C). These pasteurization temperatures are sufficient to kill all microorganisms except for bacterial spores. Since the spores will not grow because of the low pH, the food is considered commercially sterile. A high-acid food will therefore not need the high-temperature process that a low-acid food requires. A high-acid food may typically be processed in a hot water or steam bath at atmospheric pressures – no pressure-cooking is required. For this type of processing, the sealed container is heated in the bath until the internal temperature of the slowest heating point reaches the recommended pasteurization temperature for two to ten minutes depending on the pH value and other properties of the food. The time required to reach this temperature will vary and is usually set by a Recognized Process Authority after reviewing the food, evaluating the process, and perhaps conducting heat penetration tests.

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pHruit

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Posted 13 December 2021 - 06:50 PM

The Campden guide is the reference source I've encountered most widely in the UK: https://www.campdenb...s.php?pubsID=65

 

What's in your drink? Obviously not expecting you to divulge the full recipe, but some soft drink ingredients cope with heat treatment better than others. Baths can be laborious if you're doing any sort of significant volume as you've got the heating time each time you load them, as well as the hold time.

 

I've encountered a range of processes with temperatures ranging from 75C to 90C and hold time anywhere from 5 to 20 minutes. You'll possibly need to have a think about your particular ingredients, as whilst pathogen control is "relatively" easy given your pH, there are some potential soft drink ingredients that can carry a fairly hefty spoilage organism loading, and this may therefore end up being the bigger challenge to address if you're aiming for shelf-stable / ambient end product.



ckom

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Posted 13 December 2021 - 07:07 PM

The Campden guide is the reference source I've encountered most widely in the UK: https://www.campdenb...s.php?pubsID=65
 
What's in your drink? Obviously not expecting you to divulge the full recipe, but some soft drink ingredients cope with heat treatment better than others. Baths can be laborious if you're doing any sort of significant volume as you've got the heating time each time you load them, as well as the hold time.
 
I've encountered a range of processes with temperatures ranging from 75C to 90C and hold time anywhere from 5 to 20 minutes. You'll possibly need to have a think about your particular ingredients, as whilst pathogen control is "relatively" easy given your pH, there are some potential soft drink ingredients that can carry a fairly hefty spoilage organism loading, and this may therefore end up being the bigger challenge to address if you're aiming for shelf-stable / ambient end product.


They are primarily tea/botanical based. They don’t include any fruit.

We produce them hot but don’t have a way to hot fill unfortunately.

I came across the Campden publication earlier but wasn’t sure it would be be what we need. Sounds like it will be best to purchase that.


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Posted 13 December 2021 - 07:21 PM

Definitely worth getting hold of the Campden guide IMO.

Given the nature of the products you'll be somewhat less vulnerable to thermal damage from pasteurisation, but also have the added advantage that the hot brewing process should give you relatively low micro loading going into the pasteurisation. Probably worth doing a bit of micro (if not already done) on the drinks prior to pasteurisation, but I'd expect the pasteurisation to really only need to be dealing with any post-brewing contamination and anything inside the bottles prior to use, so you'll probably not need to worry too much about going over the Campden recommendations to deal with spoilage. Having spent quite a lot of time using bath pasteurisers, this is a good thing as anything you can do to speed them up without cutting safety corners is usually a good thing operationally ;)



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