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carine

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Posted 29 March 2022 - 08:58 AM

Can we have 400ppm sanitiser concentration applied in production area? 



kfromNE

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Posted 29 March 2022 - 11:50 AM

Depends. Are you applying it and not washing it off. Is it going on food grade surfaces. Read the bottle and see what the recommendations are for what you want to do.



mgourley

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Posted 29 March 2022 - 11:36 PM

200-400 ppm are the generally accepted rates for food contact surfaces here in the USA.

 

But it of course depends entirely on local regulations or specific certification body standards (Organic, etc)

 

Marshall



Rick Reyes

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Posted 30 March 2022 - 01:08 PM

Good morning Carine, KfromNE is absolutely correct, you must read the label for each individual sanitizer. Sanitizers are by law considered a pesticide and therefor in the USA regulated by the EPA for use, every pesticide label somewhere on it's label has this statement "It is a violation of federal law to use this product in a manner inconsistent with it's labeling". What this effectively means is that the label is the law and not knowing what is on the label for approved applications is not a legal defense. One thing that I will caution you is never to base your decisions for use based on active ingredients, lots of people fall into the mindset that quaternary ammonium is chemically the same no matter which product but there are other ingredients that can also determine the EPAs decision to lower the approved rate of use based on the deleterious effects of these additives regardless of the active  percentages.



Brendan Triplett

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Posted 30 March 2022 - 02:38 PM

Can you provide some insight on what product you are using?  Just wondering if it a no rinse product.  Rick is right about the regulations but product specs will make a difference.  Also make sure that you have the SDS on hand.

 

Cheers!


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Brendan Triplett


Jayce

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Posted 21 April 2022 - 01:33 PM

Hi,

 

it is depending on the type of ingredient used.. such as chlorine, QAC, PAA or alcohol base.. each come with different concentration for "rinse free" ( non rising required ) food contact surfaces . 

just wonder do you guys follow EPA guide lines or FDA guide lines on this ?



kfromNE

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Posted 21 April 2022 - 03:53 PM

Hi,

 

it is depending on the type of ingredient used.. such as chlorine, QAC, PAA or alcohol base.. each come with different concentration for "rinse free" ( non rising required ) food contact surfaces . 

just wonder do you guys follow EPA guide lines or FDA guide lines on this ?

I, like I bet everyone else, follows both guidelines. Both organizations apply as would OSHA when it comes to chemicals.






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