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sqflady

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Posted 19 October 2022 - 07:33 PM

Hello,

Currently working for a small company as QA Director and have also been assigned safety.  There are basic tasks that are completed that follow the OSHA requirements but nothing is documented. 

 

Does anyone have a general safety policy they are willing to share to help get me started?



Charles.C

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Posted 20 October 2022 - 05:13 AM

Hello,

Currently working for a small company as QA Director and have also been assigned safety.  There are basic tasks that are completed that follow the OSHA requirements but nothing is documented. 

 

Does anyone have a general safety policy they are willing to share to help get me started?

Hi sqfl,

 

Safety with respect to What ? (I deduce not Food ?).

 

Workers ?

Equipment ?

Chemicals ?

Policy = Compliance to OSHA ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


sqflady

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Posted 20 October 2022 - 01:23 PM

Pertaining to OSHA and human safety.  



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seanpaulrader

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Posted 20 October 2022 - 02:45 PM

If you're really starting from scratch, look into an OSHA 30 hour course for general industry. Don't do one of the online, self-directed programs as you won't actually learn anything. I did one through Zoom because COVID, and it was helpful, but an in-person class would be better.

 

Establish an Injury and Illness Prevention Program, Hazard Communication Program, and Lock Out/Tag Out training program. There are lots of resources on OSHA's website for this. Don't re-invent the wheel, just use one of their templates.

 

Make sure that you are tracking all injuries and illnesses properly (OSHA 300, 300A). You'll probably work with HR on this.

 

Next, I would suggest creating internal audits that are specific to occupational safety. Without knowing the nature of your business I'm not sure what your hazards are, but general items to check are:

 - Are emergency exits blocked?

 - Have all fire extinguishers been checked and signed off monthly, and recharged yearly?

 - Is all machine guarding in place?

 - Have all employees received training on equipment (including forklifts)?

 

OSHA has some industry-specific resources here, that may or may not be helpful: https://www.osha.gov...stance/industry

 

Next, just google for "Top 10 OSHA Citations", "OSHA Food Manufacturing", etc and read what comes up. Most of what I've learned has been self taught.

 

Happy to answer any additional questions. Also, let us know what industry you're in, as hazards are different in different industries.



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sqflady

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Posted 20 October 2022 - 04:44 PM

Thank you for the advice seanpaulrader.  I do have a good understanding of the basics and found some good resources online.  Now to put it together. 



emittauer1

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Posted 21 October 2022 - 12:13 PM

I would say don't forget your SDS books / access.



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PieGuy191

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Posted 24 October 2022 - 02:25 PM

I would also talk to your local Bureau of Worker's Compensation or the equivalent in your area.  They usually have courses covering many different OSHA topics that you can attend and can give good direction on what you need.  They will typically review an SOP you have written as well.  Ours has regional safety councils that meet regularly.  It is a good place to meet and talk to other safety professionals from various industries and get some ideas/help.  Good Luck!



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Hoosiersmoker

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Posted 28 October 2022 - 06:39 PM

Talk to your Loss Prevention (insurance) people. You pay them very well for their services I'm sure. Make them earn it and help you with your program. It's in their best interest to help you achieve a strong safety program. I am in nearly the same boat. SQF Assurance Manager and Safety Manager. I have taken the 30 hr OSHA course and recommend it to all Safety Managers. The 6 areas OSH requires immediate training for all employees and new hires (1st day before they hit the floor) are: Hazard Communication (Chemical control and usage - GHS), Personal Protective Equipment, Lock Out / Tag Out Program, Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure and Control, Emergency Action Plan, and Fire Prevention. These are also part of the annual safety training you'll need to have done (or do yourself) for everyone in your company. Why does Management think a Food Safety Manager has time to handle a total safety program too? I'm not getting paid a double salary!



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