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Usage of salt product after floor contact?

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confusedQC

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Posted 03 October 2023 - 08:22 PM

Just a quick question i've been doing research, but can't find exactly what I am looking for. What I want to know is can I use salt  (A commodity) that has been scrapped off the floor in my manufacturing process? BRCgs cert, organic, kosher etc. 



Brothbro

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Posted 03 October 2023 - 08:29 PM

No, that material should be disposed of. By scraping it up off the floor you're also bringing dirt, grime, bacteria, and who knows what else along with it.


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jfrey123

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Posted 03 October 2023 - 08:34 PM

A floor is always 100% going to be a non-food contact surface in any applicable law or code, ergo no product may be used after coming into touch with it.  There's specific storage regulations in US Federal Code (and most other countries) that state food must be stored a certain height off of the floor, only lowering the limits if it's within a sealed package.

 

Floors be filthy.  Who knows what else you're scraping up besides the salt?



confusedQC

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Posted 03 October 2023 - 08:39 PM

Thank you I assumed so, trying to get others to understand. would this classify as adulteration then? Intentionally using that from the floor- perhaps even being put into organic/ non-GMO finish product?



Brothbro

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Posted 03 October 2023 - 08:44 PM

Thank you I assumed so, trying to get others to understand. would this classify as adulteration then? Intentionally using that from the floor- perhaps even being put into organic/ non-GMO finish product?

 

Yes, food made with ingredient scraped off the floor would indeed be considered adulterated by FDA's definition:

 

https://www.accessda...ch.cfm?fr=110.5

 

(a) The criteria and definitions in this part shall apply in determining whether a food is adulterated (1) within the meaning of section 402(a)(3) of the act in that the food has been manufactured under such conditions that it is unfit for food; or (2) within the meaning of section 402(a)(4) of the act in that the food has been prepared, packed, or held under insanitary conditions whereby it may have become contaminated with filth, or whereby it may have been rendered injurious to health. The criteria and definitions in this part also apply in determining whether a food is in violation of section 361 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 264).



SQFconsultant

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Posted 03 October 2023 - 09:54 PM

Some years back I was conducting an inspection at a cheese company and the process conveyor that held 8 oz blocks of cheddar cheese got backed up and as I watched about 10 blocks fell on the floor.

 

Quickly a worker (with her back towards me) swooped down and gathered them in her apron and dumped them back on the line - when she realized I was watching her she yelled out - "5 second rule."


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Scampi

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Posted 04 October 2023 - 01:06 PM

Confused QC, you seem to be confused about what REGULATION you need to follow

 

GFSI is NOT who you ultimately should be concerned with ---your #1 job is to comply with the law 

 

Adulteration was posted in a PP


Please stop referring to me as Sir/sirs


MDaleDDF

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Posted 04 October 2023 - 01:54 PM

Some years back I was conducting an inspection at a cheese company and the process conveyor that held 8 oz blocks of cheddar cheese got backed up and as I watched about 10 blocks fell on the floor.

 

Quickly a worker (with her back towards me) swooped down and gathered them in her apron and dumped them back on the line - when she realized I was watching her she yelled out - "5 second rule."

this one made me lol a little bit....

 

my kid yells that same thing when he drops food on the floor....



David SS

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Posted 05 October 2023 - 03:14 AM

Salt is difficult to clean once it is contaminated, so salt that has fallen on the floor should not be used. 

 

But I'm curious about the material that can still be cleaned in the next process. For example, onions or coffee beans are cleaned in a cleaning machine in the next process. The cleaning process can remove dust, sand and other physical contaminants. For microbiology, it can be eliminated with high temperature during the cooking or roasting process.

 
For cases like the one above, is it permissible to continue using raw materials that have fallen on the floor? After checking the level of material dirtiness by QC first, for example?


G M

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Posted 05 October 2023 - 01:47 PM

 

...

For cases like the one above, is it permissible to continue using raw materials that have fallen on the floor? After checking the level of material dirtiness by QC first, for example?

 

 

Reconditioning.  This is probably limited to pre-lethality components, and those that can be reasonably cleansed of filth by trimming and washing.





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