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Dietary Supplements NSF 455-2 vs SQF

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Estrellita3

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Posted 31 October 2023 - 11:41 PM

Hello everyone, I hope you can help me with this, currently our facility is NSF 455-2 certify and we are trying to change to SQF but, we have been told that even though we have SQF we have to be NSF certify as well. Have any of you can advise the reasons for this?

 

Also, the products we are processing are juices with Zinc and ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) so because of these dietary ingredients we have declare dietary supplements, but these are not truly dietary supplements. So, I am not familiar on whether this need to be classify as dietary supplements, they seem to be more like a fortified food, but i guess in the US there is not regulation for fortified food? Does anybody have more experience on these topics?

 

Rocio



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Posted 01 November 2023 - 12:02 AM

Are you being told by a customer that you must maintain the NSF 455-2 certification even if you go with SQF?

 

NSF-455-2 is primarily for the finished product being a DIETARY SUPPLEMENT - all you are doing is adding Zinc and C - but you finished product is not a Dietary Supplement.

 

If this is customer driven I would point this out to the customer and tell them that dropping the NSF 455-2 and maintaining an SQF program is proper in place of the NSF 455-2.

 

Those are my thoughts and I'm sticking to them.


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Glenn Oster.

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Estrellita3

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Posted 01 November 2023 - 12:08 AM

Thank you Glenn, that is what i was thinking as well. I am so glad that I am not mistaken. By any chance do you know any documentation (regulation) that can point this out? about my product not being a dietary supplement?



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Posted 28 December 2023 - 09:37 PM

Hi Estrellita3,

 

Late reply, i think I just figured how to use this forum LOL! I am working in dietary supplements, and trying to get the company certified with nsf, We do have alot of work to do though. Anyway, if you have not found anything documented, here is FDAa description of WHAT IS a dietary supplement. If you dont meet this, then you are not a supplement, and likely wont need NSF.  Direct link here da.gov/food/information-consumers-using-dietary-supplements/questions-and-answers-dietary-supplements#:~:text=A%20dietary%20supplement%20is%20a,intended%20to%20supplement%20the%20diet.

 

 

What is a dietary supplement?

Congress defined the term "dietary supplement" in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) of 1994. A dietary supplement is a product intended for ingestion that, among other requirements, contains a "dietary ingredient" intended to supplement the diet. The term "dietary ingredient" includes vitamins and minerals; herbs and other botanicals; amino acids; "dietary substances" that are part of the food supply, such as enzymes and live microbials (commonly referred to as "probiotics"); and concentrates, metabolites, constituents, extracts, or combinations of any dietary ingredient from the preceding categories. Dietary supplements may be found in many forms, such as pills, tablets, capsules, gummies, softgels, liquids, and powders. They can also be in the same form as a conventional food category, such as teas or bars, but only if the product is not represented as a conventional food or as a "sole item of a meal or the diet." To be a dietary supplement, a product must also be labeled as a dietary supplement; that is, the product label must include the term "dietary supplement" or equivalent (e.g., "iron supplement" or "herbal supplement"). DSHEA places dietary supplements in a special category under the general umbrella of "foods," unless the product meets the definition of a drug (e.g., because it is labeled to treat or mitigate a disease).



Estrellita3

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Posted 19 January 2024 - 07:07 AM

Thank you for your comments. This dietary supplement has been a major road for me. So, to make it short. Yes we qualify as a dietary supplement. As Glenn explained we are not truly but the regulation says it depends on how you marketed the product. If you wanted to stick as a juice you can do it by only adding nutritional facts but if you want to marketed as dietary supplement you do supplement fact panel. If you go to the shelves you can find vitamin shots in both categories as dietary supplements or juice only. Companies do that depending on where do they want their product to be displayed. Example dietary goes in the medicine section whereas juice go in the vegetable section in the supermarket.

Anyways I have been calling lots of CB to get quotes and explain me how to change. This is what I find out! SQF module 17 is equivalent to CFR 111. So it should be ok to change to SQF, also SQF is more robust and has better reputation. Surprise for me my costumer does not accept SQF! Can you believe that? I would like to share more of my experience but unfortunately I don’t want my comment to be trash. I will only add that lobby does exist in the US





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