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Michael

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Posted 17 June 2004 - 02:17 PM

Hi,

who has experience with other possibilities (than with the common ones?) to avoid that insects come inside production and lastly into product?

e.g. common ones: overpressure, revolving doors, double doors, fly killer, fly screens

what´s about: sodium low pressure lamps (right expression? special yellow lamps with one wavelength), pheromones, special plants or special odours which insects don´t like, others?

regards
Michael



Charles Chew

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Posted 17 June 2004 - 03:20 PM

Michael,

Pests are curious species often of "unreal" characters.

Depending on what products you make and where you are (enviromental conditons), deciding on the best approach is essentially important in order to obtain the correct results.

Using pheromones if you are in a plantation is effective as you would be directly "interfering" the life cycle activities. As this is often a controlled environment, it has been found to be generally effective. (Where I come from, pheromones is commonly used in the"palm oil and cocoa plantations")

Sodium low pressure lamps is also good but is no longer largely used. Often, positioning of lamps is more important than the type used.

Special yellow lamps with one wavelength has been found to be very effective in "repelling" flies. This seems to be worth considering on a larger scale.

Generally, an effective approach is to fight the "enemies" before it reaches the production area. Therefore, the external parameters of the facility is where most of the warfare should be fought. Once it reaches the fringes sof the production area, yuo have lost the "war"

Avoiding attraction of insects is a start by having good hygiene practices and not leaving any leftovers as a food source for these pests. Source out and rid off harborage areas, having well lighted environment, avoid damp conditions etc are some of the issues that may need to be addressed.

Its a big field and just not possible to "tell it all" but I agree with you, sharing experiences is a way to go.

Charles Chew


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Charles Chew
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Simon

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Posted 19 June 2004 - 02:50 PM

Excellent advice Charles.

I have a couple of points to add. Make sure that there's no standing (stagnant) water in roofs, gutters, drains etc. as some insects such as mosquitoes and midges like to breed there. Also UV electric fly killers are very effective at zapping the larger insects by attracting and electrocuting them., but be very careful not to place them so that they are visible to the outside as they will attract passing insects inside, also position EFK's a good distance from unprotected product as when an insect hits the electric grid it can explode and the fragments of frazzled insect can cover quite a distance.

One of the most important things is proofing. Keep doors closed when not in use and fly screen all doors and windows that can open. I know a factory can be a very hot and uncomfortable place to work in summer and usually the air conditioning budget doesn't run to the factory. You know it can get very hot and sticky pushing paper about in an office and of course management sit there. :thumbdown:

An alternative to traditional mesh fly screens are chain screens which are good at keeping insects out and they are very durable - they let lots of lovely fresh air in too!

http://www.chainscre...in-screens.html

Regards,
Simon


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Edwina Chicken Currie

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Posted 09 July 2004 - 05:55 PM

:bug: Hedgeapples and catnip!
I don't think use would meet GMP requirements though.


Michael

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Posted 19 August 2004 - 06:25 AM

Hi,

By Internet requiry I found the following adress:

http://www.luftwandtechnologie.de

Does s.o. has experience with such a technique?

Seemed to be interesting.

Kind regards

Michael



Simon

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Posted 19 August 2004 - 11:38 AM

Hi Michael,

I have no experience of this sorry. I've attached their English Language brochure for interest.

Anyone else? :dunno:

Regards,
Simon

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Franco

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Posted 19 August 2004 - 01:30 PM

Anyone else?  :dunno:


No, unfortunately.

Would you folks buy/recommend this stuff for your company if clear evidence of effectiveness was given, possibly with a comparison test carried out by an independent organization ?

I would, for sure, but I doubt there's such evidence available.

An ancient Chinese proverb teaches that the person who waits for a roast duck to fly into their mouth must wait a very long time.

Neil Radford

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Posted 21 October 2004 - 10:59 PM

Michael
Taking a simplistic view insects may arise for one of both of the following reasons:
1) The have got in recently due to a proofing deficiency or contaminated delivery.
2) They got in some time ago, and have set up home.

For resolving 1)
Make a proofing survey perhaps ask a pest controller. Is proofing perfect? If answer is yes, then go to 2)

For resolving 2)
Find their home. Usually an inaccessible corner, usually warm with damp food residues. Can you honestly say that every corner of equipment where food residue might occur is inspected and cleaned. If answer is yes then go to 1)

If all the above fails, then start looking more deeply into the building structure.
Remember that all pest contorl devices should be considered as detectors, and not controls. They detection enables localised prodblems to be identfied, and then eliminated.

One interesting experience I had some years ago was with roof extractor fans whereby an well intended engineer reversed the electrical polarity after a routine service just before a swarm of bees flew overhead. Needless to say the place was buzzing for hours until the bee keeper arrived.


Edited by Neil Radford, 21 October 2004 - 11:14 PM.


Charles Chew

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Posted 22 October 2004 - 10:45 AM

Neil,

Thank you for the comments and Yes, I am all in agreement with you that pest control plans are merely detective devices for the purpose of monitoring and measuring effectiveness of our controls and where required, to go beyond the norm if all failed.

In essense - Prevention & Elimination= Failure = INFESTATIONS

Charles Chew


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shivendratripathi

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Posted 11 November 2004 - 11:25 AM

Dear Simon,

As a part of the Pest Control how critical is the usage of air curtain. Is there any worldwide standard for air velocity and volume.

Also there are is something called positive pressure? Is that really requirement? helpful? Can provide pestcontrol? What is the recommended value?

rgds

Shivendra






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