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Globalisation of the Food Industry and the BRC Standards

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Simon

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 09:34 AM

I just read an interesting article on a Far East website, here is an extract:


Imagine the delight in the offices of the Meiji Seika Food Company when the world's largest retailer, Wal-Mart, said it wanted to stock Hello Panda confectionery. The dollar—or yen—signs must have flashed in their eyes. But there was one condition. Wal-Mart wanted Meiji to get British Retail Consortium certification (BRC) for its production processes.

What Meiji went through is becoming common in the food industry. Retailers want third-party assurance that their suppliers are competent, and aren't likely to poison customers. And it's a sign of how globalised the business has become: an American retailer asking a Japanese firm to get British-invented certification for its Singapore factory.


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gireesh

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 10:12 AM

Hi Simon,

I know it is a bit silly but can you let me know a link by which I can know some thing about BRC like how is it different to HACCP? We don'nt have any exposure to BRC in my part of world so I would only like to get an overview about BRC to start with.
Thanks,
Gireesh.

I just read an interesting article on a Far East website, here is an extract:


Imagine the delight in the offices of the Meiji Seika Food Company when the world's largest retailer, Wal-Mart, said it wanted to stock Hello Panda confectionery. The dollar—or yen—signs must have flashed in their eyes. But there was one condition. Wal-Mart wanted Meiji to get British Retail Consortium certification (BRC) for its production processes.

What Meiji went through is becoming common in the food industry. Retailers want third-party assurance that their suppliers are competent, and aren't likely to poison customers. And it's a sign of how globalised the business has become: an American retailer asking a Japanese firm to get British-invented certification for its Singapore factory.



Simon

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 08:22 PM

I know it is a bit silly but can you let me know a link by which I can know some thing about BRC like how is it different to HACCP? We don'nt have any exposure to BRC in my part of world so I would only like to get an overview about BRC to start with.

No question is silly Gireesh only answers - as I prove every day. :biggrin:

This clip from the BRC website should help to explain:

About the BRC Global Standard Food
The Standard was created to establish a standard for the supply of food products and to act as key piece of evidence for UK retailers and brand owners to demonstrate ‘due diligence*' in the face of potential prosecution by the enforcement authorities.

This publication has now become the international mark of excellence. Certification to the Standard verifies technical competence and aids manufacturers, brand owners and retailers fulfilment of legal obligations. It also safeguards the consumer.

Changes in legislation are included in the new 2005 edition, affecting:

  • traceability of food components through the supply chain
  • ensuring that food components remain uncontaminated by other elements - important when allergens labelling becomes a statutory requirement next year
  • food product suppliers being able to advertise that farmed goods in their products come from a particular source
  • ensuring that guidelines governing various processes in the manufacture of food products are sufficiently robust
  • pointers on what suppliers can say in their communications
The retail industry, food manufacturers, importers, caterers, ingredient suppliers and the food service industry can all benefit greatly from this essential Standard. The Standard is currently used by suppliers in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, the Far East, Australasia, North and South America - a truly global Standard.

The Standard possesses a comprehensive scope covering all areas of product safety and legality, the Standard addresses part of the due diligence requirements of both the supplier and the retailer.

The Standard covers such critical topics as:

Get FREE bitesize education with IFSQN webinar recordings.
 
Download this handy excel for desktop access to over 180 Food Safety Friday's webinar recordings.
https://www.ifsqn.com/fsf/Free%20Food%20Safety%20Videos.xlsx

 
Check out IFSQN’s extensive library of FREE food safety videos
https://www.ifsqn.com/food_safety_videos.html




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