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Fuel, LPG or Electric driven forklifts


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moshes

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Posted 20 February 2005 - 04:55 PM

For level B, is anything less than Electric driven forklift allowed, in the production area, close to the extrusion and lamination lines, for primary packaging for milk and juices ? :uhm:



Simon

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Posted 21 February 2005 - 08:52 AM

Hi Moshes, its Monday morning so I‘m going to take a chance and answer without reaching for the Standard, though I'm pretty sure it doesn't mention anything about forklift trucks.

Because the standard is designed to be applied to a wide-range of packaging processes it is impossible for it to be prescriptive about absolutely everything, and that's where the hazard analysis of your process comes in.

I don't know a lot about different types of forklift truck e.g. fuel, LPG etc., but if you consider the risk I would say it would probably have to be electric driven or another that does not pollute the environment - and potentially give rise to product taint.

I take it LPG gives off fumes Moshes?

If you are BRC/IOP Registered Company (Cat B) what forklift trucks do you use in production?

Regards,
Simon


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MartLgn

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Posted 21 February 2005 - 12:56 PM

We are a cat B certified producer of primary contact packaging and we use battery trucks, your'e quite right Simon the standard makes no reference to FLT's but to be honest with regard to the possibility of product taint I think this is an absolute no brainer in favour of electric. If you've ever been in a stores where propane or diesel trucks operate the air is blue and Im not talking about the language ! On an wider environmental level there is the debate about the pollution produced by the power stations but if we restrict ourselves to concern about product tait I would imagine your customers would prefer electric also.


Why put off until tomorrow that which you can avoid doing altogether ?

moshes

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Posted 21 February 2005 - 04:48 PM

I take it LPG gives off fumes Moshes?

If you are BRC/IOP Registered Company (Cat B) what forklift trucks do you use in production?

Regards,
Simon


In food production an electric forklift is a must. In my opinion, one should strongly recomend the same for production lines for BRC/IOP (Cat B) for packaging food products.
Although you are right and it is not mentioned specifically in the version 1 and version 2 of BRC/IOP it is almost obvious that the electric forklift is the right choice. :rolleyes:
LPG gives smell and also fumes, which can easily affect the relevant packaging.
I assume that in the warehouse or open air, also a diessel or LPG would be a possibility, but not in production rooms.
What do you think ?
Regards, :clap:
Moshes


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Posted 21 February 2005 - 08:47 PM

Moshes I think we're all agreed an electric FLT is the safe option. Or maybe nuclear…price permitting. :lol2:

Martin thanks for sharing your experience. :thumbup:

Regards,
Simon


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moshes

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Posted 23 February 2005 - 05:12 AM

Moshes I think we're all agreed an electric FLT is the safe option.  Or maybe nuclear…price permitting.  :lol2:

Martin thanks for sharing your experience. :thumbup:

Regards,
Simon


Simon Tks for your help. You really have an open mind, love your ideas. :thumbup:
Martin, I appreciate your contribution and clarifications to the issue. :clap:
Moshes


Charles Chew

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Posted 23 February 2005 - 02:30 PM

Moses,

Where do you store the back-up batteries and the location of your battery charging area? No smoke is good but other hazards may be present.

CHarles Chew


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Simon

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Posted 24 February 2005 - 09:02 PM

Where do you store the back-up batteries and the location of your battery charging area? No smoke is good but other hazards may be present.

Like what Charles? :dunno:

BTW Moshes, I think LPG would probably be OK in the warehouse and definitely OK outside.

Regards,
Simon

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Charles Chew

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 02:39 AM

Simon,

Battery charging areas are considered sources of chemical hazards apart from being a potential risk to workers as well.

For convenience, battery charging is usually done in the store / warehouse where ingredients or finished products are also kept. However, it is perfectly ok where barriers are installed within the store designed specifically for charging.

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moshes

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Posted 25 February 2005 - 11:49 AM

Simon,

Battery charging areas are considered sources of chemical hazards apart from being a potential risk to workers as well.

For convenience, battery charging is usually done in the store / warehouse where ingredients or finished products are also kept. However, it is perfectly ok where barriers are installed within the store designed specifically for charging.

Charles Chew


Charles.
Your point is noticed. It is right that in most cases charging is done in warehouses, while barriers are not always in place. On the other hand these areas are ventilated, and air change is an ongoing process. Are there any objective evidences that the electric charging operation itself is a source of chemical hazard ? What are the risks for workers ? :uhm:
Moshes





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