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Alternative for Zip Ties/ Cable Ties

foreign material SQF

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#1 ChocolatesMyGame

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 08:57 PM

Hi,

Anybody out there have a good alternative to zip ties?  We are currently working towards SQF certification and obviously can not be having zip ties all over for temporary fixes, etc.  I know they make a metal detectable zip tie, but I would like to move away from them all together.  Currently the facility is using them for holding cords in place but even these pose a FM potential.  Anyone find a product that works?

 

Thanks!


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#2 GMO

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 10:56 AM

Well you do need something to hold cables in place.  The alternatives are often worse, e.g. dairy tubes are a nightmare to clean.  Metal detectable and x-ray visible cable ties are the best option IMO.


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#3 Setanta

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 12:51 PM

I haven't found a suitable replacement, either.  We use cable ties with highly contrasting colors. 


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#4 Avila

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 04:23 AM

I haven't found a suitable replacement, either.  We use cable ties with highly contrasting colors. 

good idea :smile:


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#5 shasha8705

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Posted 31 March 2015 - 01:16 PM

I'm not sure if there is the "perfect" alternative. We use metal detectable zip ties as a requirement from one of our customers and have since validated their detection ability by cutting one in small pieces and validating the smallest particle of the zip tie that can still be read by our metal detector which was approximately a quarter of an inch. Then in the event of a missing or damaged zip tie is found (or not found) we know what the risk level is of detection. We will also we validate every new lot of zip ties we get in the make sure they still meet previous validations.


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#6 mgourley

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Posted 31 March 2015 - 02:03 PM

We do the same as shasha. 

As long as the ties are applied sparingly and trimmed appropriately, that's about the best "non-solution" to your query.

 

Marshall


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#7 xylough

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Posted 31 March 2015 - 02:12 PM

All,

 

The risk/hazard had never crossed my mind before and caught me off guard. Thanks for the question and the answers! Engineering and maintenance use these things like breathing out and breathing in. I have seen them in a state of disintegration before; they get brittle with heat and age, then will fragment at the touch. I'm going to research if there is a brand with documented testing or warranty of life under various conditions. They need to be included in parts and tools control program and on the brittle plastics register in zone one areas. The color and detection idea contributions are great. Thanks again for the topic.


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#8 xylough

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Posted 31 March 2015 - 03:20 PM

It would seem there are both international (IEC) and North American (NEMA) cable tie standards for Canada, US and Mexico  based on the international standards and technically equivalent. I'm sure my engineering and maintenance personnel just buy and use what is convenient. I'm thinking that use of the correct tie for the application and environment might affect risk/hazard for both food safety and personnel safety.

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#9 johnwest19

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 10:38 AM

I haven't discovered a proper option of zip ties. Then if no zip tie is reachable, at that point a twist tie, a strong focus wire, or a cord might be utilized to tie cables or other request.


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#10 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 10:02 PM

As an alternative in some of your more "permanent" zip tie areas, sometimes worm drive hose clamps can work really well. They come in tiny sizes for wire bundling and other uses, stainless steel, and will take a very long time to deteriorate. On the minus side they're a pain to both use and remove, so they're a good fix for more permanent repairs.

 

Examples: https://www.google.c...iw=1920&bih=989


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For discussions related to food safety, production, and agriculture. Check out my blog at http://furfarmandfork.com/.

 






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