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Poll: Are you happy with your job? (175 member(s) have cast votes)

Are you happy with your job?

  1. I'm delighted with it (28 votes [16.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 16.00%

  2. I am happy, even though it has its annoyances (79 votes [45.14%])

    Percentage of vote: 45.14%

  3. It pays the rent (13 votes [7.43%])

    Percentage of vote: 7.43%

  4. I'm not happy, but not unhappy enough to make a change (18 votes [10.29%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.29%

  5. I'm not happy at all and thinking about what to do next (33 votes [18.86%])

    Percentage of vote: 18.86%

  6. Other (4 votes [2.29%])

    Percentage of vote: 2.29%

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#26 Simon

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Posted 22 May 2015 - 05:54 AM

Very sorry to hear that Kevin, hopefully you will move on to bigger, better and brighter things.

 

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Simon


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#27 KevinB

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 12:05 AM

Hi Simon,

 

Thank you very much. I am  not leaving QA or the network just leaving my current company. Moving from Dairy to lobster processing company that is looking to to get certified under BRC.  Senior Management's was to distribute my responsibilities to the other supervisors. i will most definitely be reaching out to members in the seafood industry.

 

Sincerely,

Kevin 


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#28 Simon

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 10:10 AM

Well that's great news all round Kevin. :clap:

 

Best wishes with your new challenge. 

 

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Simon


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#29 ladytygrr

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 06:42 PM

Just started my job on the 8th of this month and, up until yesterday, I was 100% delighted. Today, I'm still generally delighted but disappointed in a response from Management.

 

I had ID'd a hole in our traceability: no PO #s or other identifying # tracing all of our documents together from quote and order to receiving the product and C of A. It can technically be done because we're so small but there's no proof. I brought this to the attention of the entire (small) company and Management said that we won't implement anything that costs money unless the risk outweighs the cost of the implementation. (!!!!)

 

We can easily rectify this with simply putting PO #s on docs and that won't cost any money but I was so amazed at the response that I haven't done anything else. I was hired to be Project Mgr/Head of QA and work with our Ops Mgr (who has an extensive food background but I don't -- only experience as an internal auditor for ISO, API and A2LA) to complete our HACCP plan and get us certified to SQF Level 2.

 

But if this is the kind of response I'm going to get, it gives me pause. 

 

My philosophy and belief is that I am not here to tell anyone how to do their jobs; rather I was hired to help develop our programs and strengthen them by finding weak spots in the processes that keep us from being up to code/standard and yet when I open my mouth about something very straight-forward, I'm completely annihilated.

 

Does anyone have any wisdom they can share?


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#30 MWidra

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 08:38 PM

Emily, welcome to the world of resistance to change.  It is a characteristic of all humans, and it has not changed in centuries.  I see no earth-shattering changes in the future, either.

 

As an auditor, you are used to being where you were the person they had to please.  Now you need to be more persuasive.  Don't get discouraged, but remember that you are the new kid on the block, and others may see you as rocking the boat.

 

I feel that an approach that is problem and solution oriented works best.  Define the problem, and first solicit ideas from everyone.  Getting everyone involved will first off get them to buy into the solution, but it can also find a better solution that you could think of yourself.  It's called synergy, and it is wonderful when it works.

 

If you have ever been in a situation where the ideas just came rapidly and everyone got excited about solving a problem, you know how invigorating and energizing the process can be.  It's been described as 1 + 1+ 1+ 1 = 100.

 

So step back, and see if you can become part of the group by enlisting them in the process instead of being an outsider telling them what to do.

 

Martha


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#31 ladytygrr

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 12:55 PM

Emily, welcome to the world of resistance to change.  It is a characteristic of all humans, and it has not changed in centuries.  I see no earth-shattering changes in the future, either.

 

As an auditor, you are used to being where you were the person they had to please.  Now you need to be more persuasive.  Don't get discouraged, but remember that you are the new kid on the block, and others may see you as rocking the boat.

 

I feel that an approach that is problem and solution oriented works best.  Define the problem, and first solicit ideas from everyone.  Getting everyone involved will first off get them to buy into the solution, but it can also find a better solution that you could think of yourself.  It's called synergy, and it is wonderful when it works.

 

If you have ever been in a situation where the ideas just came rapidly and everyone got excited about solving a problem, you know how invigorating and energizing the process can be.  It's been described as 1 + 1+ 1+ 1 = 100.

 

So step back, and see if you can become part of the group by enlisting them in the process instead of being an outsider telling them what to do.

 

Martha

Martha,

 

Again I must thank you for your wisdom.

 

The funny part is that I tried your suggestion from the get-go. I DEFINITELY don't want them to think I am trying to tell them what to do - because I don't want that... they're the experts at their jobs, not me! So my intro to my email was "I would like to open a dialog within the group to see what we can all come up with for solution(s) to the problem." And still the let down.

 

After a couple of days of reflection, I decided I'm not going to let it get me down. I am going to take advantage of the Food Safety Friday seminar this Friday which discusses the economics of food safety. Then I'll have more persuasive arguments in my arsenal. A bit of it is also learning the corporate culture (literally my least favorite part of a new job). I am now more knowledgeable about how to approach things in my company which is a very good thing!

 

I look forward to learning more about my company and the food industry --- setbacks, battles, achievements and everything in between!!!

 

~Emily~


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#32 Simon

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 06:16 PM

Martha,

 

Again I must thank you for your wisdom.

 

The funny part is that I tried your suggestion from the get-go. I DEFINITELY don't want them to think I am trying to tell them what to do - because I don't want that... they're the experts at their jobs, not me! So my intro to my email was "I would like to open a dialog within the group to see what we can all come up with for solution(s) to the problem." And still the let down.

 

After a couple of days of reflection, I decided I'm not going to let it get me down. I am going to take advantage of the Food Safety Friday seminar this Friday which discusses the economics of food safety. Then I'll have more persuasive arguments in my arsenal. A bit of it is also learning the corporate culture (literally my least favorite part of a new job). I am now more knowledgeable about how to approach things in my company which is a very good thing!

 

I look forward to learning more about my company and the food industry --- setbacks, battles, achievements and everything in between!!!

 

~Emily~

 

As the great Michael Stipe sung recently

 

"I cannot tell a lie. It's not all cherry pie. But it's all there waiting for you. Yeah you."

 

And here it is. :smile:

 

Regards,

Simon


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#33 JohnWheat

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 02:30 PM

Most of us appear to be in the happy but with annoyances category :roflmao:

If I could have 'stayed escaped' from the food industry in 1999/2000 I certainly would have! Now I'm a little old and its claws are well and truly stuck so the annoyances that are industry wide i'll have to live with.. :rofl2:


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#34 Simon

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 06:27 PM

Most of us appear to be in the happy but with annoyances category :roflmao:

If I could have 'stayed escaped' from the food industry in 1999/2000 I certainly would have! Now I'm a little old and its claws are well and truly stuck so the annoyances that are industry wide i'll have to live with.. :rofl2:

 

One thing being in food supply is safer than some industries, people gotta eat.  

Not quite as safe as being an undertaker, but pretty secure. There's a lot to be said for that.


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#35 QAGB

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Posted 22 February 2016 - 01:46 PM

This is a great topic and I would like some advice as well. I may ramble but any good feedback would be great.

 

I am 24 years old, currently a QA Manager/ SQF Practitioner in the dairy industry. 

 

I started 3 years ago as a lab technician right after finishing my biochemistry undergrad degree and moved up the ranks fairly quickly to a 3rd shift supervisor in the yogurt business. After about 6 months I was moved to the 1st/2nd shift sanitation supervisor. I have received training in SQF, HACCP, and better process. After about 5 months of sanitation, I was asked to fill in as a manager for a bit. However, when it came hiring a manager,I interviewed, immediately the vp said your not ready. I was overlooked to by someone with zero qa experience and someone who did not even know what CIP was. She prob never even looked at a HACCP plan in her life. I left due to pay, hours, and location.

 

So I left to become a manager at a poultry plant. This was way more money, location was further, and had okay benefits. This did not work out so well. Within 5 months I was outta there due to issues I cannot say. This is not even on my resume. 

 

I then decided I would follow through with a recruiter that called and made my way into this dairy position. Good pay, good benefits, good location, however now they want me to work 7 days a week, and I am getting into big issues with higher management. I want to be a team player, and my techs know I am available if needed through phone, text, email 24/7. I actually just received another call from a recruiter for more money, same benefits, same distance, etc.

 

Any advance would help. I understand the politics involved, however it seems these corporations will lie to get you in the door.

 

Am I TURNING INTO A JOB HOPPER? it seems so. I do not want this on my resume at 24 years old. but the recruiters keep calling.

 

MIKE

 

Hi Mike,

 

I realize this is a fairly old thread, and you might not be around anymore. I wish I had been on here last year to have seen this.

 

I'm just a few years older than you. Out of undergrad, I started out as a chemist in food and dietary sciences. I worked at the company for 3 years while doing graduate studies at the same time. I found that although I thought I wanted to work in the laboratory, it just did not suit me very well. I was very unhappy with where I was, and ended up finding a QA Specialist job in the sweetener industry. I had a lot to learn as the company I work for has so many different processes, and not all of them are sweetener related. We were also just starting out on BRC as the company was not certified yet. My job became trying to work on procedures and so forth to get us ready for BRC. Prior to our first BRC audit, I became the QA Manager. This will be my 3rd year at the company, and my second year in management. There's still quite I bit I need to learn, but while here we've been certified BRC and have maintained the certification. I give credit to my predecessor as he definitely laid the foundation to which I have been able to work and implement more.

 

I've had to wear many hats since working here, and it can be stressful. We've got over 60 suppliers of goods, and I manage over 300 ingredients. I lead in our own company's audits (1st, 2nd, and 3rd, and all regulatory inspections), I conduct supplier audits, I create and revise HACCP plans (certified HACCP Manager), create technical data including specifications, and nutritional panels, I run two laboratories, answer customer calls, and I'm in charge of R&D at the moment....among all of the everyday QA duties for production. Granted this is not a large corporation, the workload can be a challenge even with a team of 5-6 people.

 

Back to your original question: yes, you are somewhat of a job hopper. I'm not saying that all of the circumstances would have allowed you any better. You rose very quickly up the ranks (that's awesome by the way, and shows your talents), and it does hurt to be told you aren't ready for a job that you had basically been doing for some time by someone who may or may not know anything about QA. Pay, hours, and location are huge factors in considering a job (I had to move closer to mine, because the snow commute was miserable), so I can understand how all of those factors and being told you weren't ready could have made you unhappy. It is quite possible, however, that you weren't quite ready for all of the duties, but I'm sure you could have learned them in time.

 

The issues at the poultry plant must have been horrible for you not to use that, so I'll move on to the dairy position. The dairy position requires you to be at the work location everyday, or be on call every day? I would think the latter, since I'm pretty sure there are regulations against working 7 days a week without a day off (if you work full time). I'm pretty much always on call (not that too many unusual things happen -- but they do), and I've had to work Saturdays (not that I really enjoy that either). So if you're meaning you're on call everyday, but the pay, benefits, and location are good, and you're happy otherwise, there's nothing I can see wrong with staying. As a QA Manager, you're probably going to be on call 24/7 anywhere you go, unless someone higher up is the emergency contact and/or nothing ever goes wrong at your facility. So, I would've said stick with your current position. Being in dairy puts you in demand, as there are fairly strict regulations for dairy and you'll learn a lot.

 

As for comments about having to work on the production or sanitation side of the company, I can understand why that would be a great idea. There were so many things about production and sanitation that I had to learn when I came in the door, but I learned those things by talking to people and learning their processes. No, I can't run an entire CIP system, but I worked with the only person who could (someone from the equipment company taught them when the equipment was implemented), and I made an 81 step procedure as to how to do that particular job -- we had nothing official in place before hand (it was all done from memory and some old notes). The person who can run the CIP system (a partial CIP system) couldn't have written the procedure on their own, but they were able to walk me through the process and show me what they used. We have complementary jobs. We all work as a team. There are things I do that our production personnel can't do, and there are things they do, that I don't know how to do, or don't have the training necessary to do. In the end, it all works out if you work together.

 

Long story short, I hope you stayed with the job in dairy. You'll find out as many other posters have said, that there are going to be annoyances, and you'll probably end up wearing a lot of hats as a QA Manager. If you find that this sort of position isn't for you, there are a number of other jobs you can do in the food industry (like project management or even R&D), and maybe you'll find that to your liking. It only hurts you to job hop, and I hope you have sorted it all out.

 

 

QAGB


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#36 Charles.C

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 10:36 PM

Hi QAGB,

 

Thanks for the above. A lot of truisms.

 

Personally I have experienced work situations across the entire range of enjoyment/otherwise reported in this thread. One hopes to learn from both.

 

I agree with yr comment about "working together".  In addition to co-workers, Company Management Style can also be critical IMO. And perhaps even more so in a Group situation.


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#37 GMO

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 09:07 AM

I was happy but things have changed.  It used to be something the senior team were bought into but no longer.


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#38 Wowie

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 01:33 PM

I was happy but things have changed.  It used to be something the senior team were bought into but no longer.

 

 

I am so sorry you're going through an especially tough time right now, GMO. I think we've all had those moments where driving home at night we're wondering if we were proud of how the day went, and we struggled with going in the next day simply because of the dynamics at work, and how we in Quality are often seen as far more disposable than other positions.

 

I'm going to talk about the only time me acting out in response to the way I was treated worked:

 

It's the moment I'm least proud of in my career. When I was working with a very stubborn group of managers, I called a Food Safety/Quality Team meeting. Not only were the shift, plant, and complex managers late, I had to ask about the timeline on new equipment that was supposed to come in. Lo and behold, it would be in the next day... At 7 am. I had not updated flowcharts, HACCP plans, swab lists, or notified USDA. I didn't have any COAs or LOGs from the manufacturer. This was just weeks after I had sent an email for the third time asking to be notified of equipment changes or installs so we would all be prepared (after USDA held us up at pre-op for the same issue). When I was told that it would be the next day, I closed my notebook, stood up and, without a word, began to walk out. The complex manager asked me if that was the end of the meeting, and I told him that from now on, they would all receive the same amount of respect for their jobs as I did for mine. That day, I did not make the daily production meeting, I did not send the weekly updates for Salmonella, Campy, NR's, or hold information, so they had nothing to report on their call. I had all the information available, but since nobody asked for it directly, nobody received it. This situation blew up and became very ugly before they realized I was not joking. In front of HR, I explained that I had received no emails asking for that information, so there was no retaliation. We discussed the fact that incorrect HACCP plans could have us shut down, and the amount of time we would be down for me to correct all documents associated with new equipment would far outweigh the amount of time they saved by not communicating with me. I explained how passionate I was about our brand, our product, and getting every pound of meat out the back door. Several other items were also brought up, and they sat in silence in front of the complex HR manager before she told them it sounded like they had a skewed idea of how management relationships work, while she had started the meeting telling me I was making the team look like idiots for not sending information when needed. 
 
A few months later, the upper management was slowly weeded out and replaced. That had little to do with me, although the Vice President did call me to ask how I felt about the team. I think it was just back up information for a decision he had already made.
 
I'm not sure how HR works there, or how okay you are with very heated confrontation (I'm pretty feisty for 5'2"), but sometimes being a complete jerk is the only way to get a jerk's attention.

 

 


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#39 GMO

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 07:57 AM

Interesting idea but very confrontational.  I have my feisty moments though.  I listened to one member of the senior team tell me a few days back how the Ops guys had been spending "too much time on technical stuff"
I had to point out, the fact we'd had two audits in a week was due to a series of complaints.

"Yes"

"Complaints caused by not following the correct controls in production"
"Yes"
"and by poor complaints investigation for not finding root cause over a month ago.  Had we, this would not have been an issue."
Blusters...  "Well we have other priorities GMO!!!"

FFS yes and they cost you weeks of work.  That is not a technical issue, it's an operations one.

What I can't get my team to see is that yes, it is sometimes painful but by spending a couple of hours really resolving something, they save themselves weeks of work.  We are in constant firefighting mode and I can't get them to see that this is detrimental and a waste of everyone's time.

 

:crybaby:


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#40 anna898

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 10:18 AM

I have been actively job searching for several months.  While I believe in our products and love my co-workers; the top management in my company does not support food safety.  A food safety culture has to come from the top.  And if a vice-president of the company won't take the gum out of his mouth when he walks through the facility how am I supposed to tell the workers they can't chew gum??  And that's just one tiny example of how what I try to do gets sabotaged.  I could go on and on.  It's laughable. 

 

:beam:  

I agree with that. I like my job and always try to give an example but if you haven't got a proper support from top management like you said Nancy it is very annoying sometimes. there always will be complaining like  '' if he/she can why we can't' :(


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