Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Is wearing of hairnets in the restroom allowed?

food safety sqf hairnets gmp hygiene

  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 jkat3286

jkat3286

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 7 posts
  • 2 thanks
4
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 21 October 2015 - 11:03 PM

Hello Everyone

 

I have been going back and forth while updating some of our personal hygiene GMP's on the issue of being able to wear hairnets when using the restroom and then returning to the production floor. I work in a very large food manufacturing plant and we are preparing for our first SQF audit. Most of the issues we face are pretty straight forward but I'm not sure about the ruling on being able to wear hairnets in the restroom. If you have any guidance I would really appreciate it.

 

Thanks 


  • 2

Thanked by 1 Member:

#2 Simon

Simon

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 11,391 posts
  • 1018 thanks
225
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Life, Family, Running, Cycling, Manager of a Football Team, Work, Watching Sport, The Internet, Food, Real Ale and Sleeping...

Posted 22 October 2015 - 05:52 AM

An important detail required.  

 

Do they remove other hygienic work-wear prior to using the restroom?

 

Regards,

Simon


  • 0

Best Regards,

Simon Timperley
IFSQN Administrator
 
hand-pointing-down.gif

Need food safety advice?
Relax, you've come to the right place…

The IFSQN is a helpful network of volunteers providing answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts on food safety management systems and a wide range of food safety topics.

 
We could make a huge list of rules, terms and conditions, but you probably wouldn’t read them.

All that we ask is that you observe the following:


1. No spam, profanity, pornography, trolling or personal attacks

2. Topics and posts should be “on topic” and related to site content
3. No (unpaid) advertising
4. You may have one account on the board at any one time
5. Enjoy your stay!


#3 BrummyJim

BrummyJim

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 280 posts
  • 97 thanks
21
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South West
  • Interests:Motorbike gone now. Only the dog to walk!

Posted 22 October 2015 - 07:56 AM

I've never worked at a place where it was permitted. It doesn't sound right to me.


  • 0

#4 Dr Vu

Dr Vu

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 189 posts
  • 33 thanks
15
Good

  • Canada
    Canada
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Toronto
  • Interests:Action movies...

Posted 22 October 2015 - 11:38 AM

depends on your product risk .. i would say..

 

 previous place i was orking risk wasnt really with micros but wilth foreign material. hair in particular.. and we ended up allowing hairnets in lunchrooms and washrooms and our hair complaints went significantly down...no auditor objected as we justified it pretty well.


  • 0
A vu in time , saves nine

#5 qalearner

qalearner

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 93 posts
  • 17 thanks
7
Neutral

  • Canada
    Canada
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 22 October 2015 - 12:28 PM

Hmm, I have never worked in a place where hairnets needed to be removed. Workers wore them everywhere. Do you have people change their footwear before and after entering the washroom?


  • 0

#6 Dr Vu

Dr Vu

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 189 posts
  • 33 thanks
15
Good

  • Canada
    Canada
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Toronto
  • Interests:Action movies...

Posted 22 October 2015 - 12:56 PM

yeah  hair comes off,, sits on the shoulders and ends up in the product..


  • 0
A vu in time , saves nine

#7 ladytygrr

ladytygrr

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 201 posts
  • 64 thanks
16
Good

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Grand Rapids, MI
  • Interests:Reading, cycling, writing, camping, knitting, movies, music, family + pets, trying to play the guitar

Posted 22 October 2015 - 04:44 PM

Thank you for asking this question, jkat. This is something that has been a topic of discussion around here. If we are removing our lab coats before using the restroom, why would we leave our hairnets on? Someone here mentioned taking hair nets off and then hair will fall on your shoulders, etc. But if you're removing the rest of your PPE, is there really more risk during the bathroom break or lunch break of hair falling onto shoulders than there is when they are arriving in the morning?


  • 0

Once in a while you get shown the light, in the darkest of places if you look at it right. -Grateful Dead

 


#8 jkat3286

jkat3286

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 7 posts
  • 2 thanks
4
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 22 October 2015 - 09:21 PM

It seems we all have the same questions lol. Employees are required to remove all other PPE when entering the restroom and I have also brought up the issue of having a station to sanitize boots before they re-enter production. We have also had issues with hair but we use lint rollers frequently and that has really helped and also they should never be wearing their lab coats without putting a hairnet on first. I too believe that if it is enough of a risk that the lab coat must remain outside the restroom why does this same logic not apply to the hairnet?

 

Thank you everyone for the input it seems like i'm not the only one finding this rule to be unclear.


  • 0

#9 RMAV

RMAV

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 391 posts
  • 110 thanks
36
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA - Midwest
  • Interests:QA, Micro, Sanitation;
    Meats, Juice, Condiments;
    SQF, Audit, and aviation

Posted 22 October 2015 - 10:50 PM

I'd change hairnets.  If for nothing else, hairnets get worn throughout the workday and need replaced anyway.  Other than perhaps a very small contingent of product types where "hair falling on shoulders from a hairnet" would pose a significant risk, I'd think a bigger risk is having a worn-out hairnet.


  • 0

#10 Ray_in_Saudi

Ray_in_Saudi

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 24 posts
  • 3 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Saudi Arabia
    Saudi Arabia

Posted 03 November 2015 - 12:54 PM

Years ago, I watched an episode in Oprah where Dr. OZ was talking about poop. He said that when one flushes the toilet, minute poop particles are sent airborne, thus spreading fecal matter. He even advised not to store toothbrushes near toilet bowls. They even made micro tests on toothbrushes and other surfaces/things near the toilet bowl and found them positive for fecal matter. 


  • 0

#11 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 12,462 posts
  • 3246 thanks
347
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 03 November 2015 - 07:01 PM

Years ago, I watched an episode in Oprah where Dr. OZ was talking about poop. He said that when one flushes the toilet, minute poop particles are sent airborne, thus spreading fecal matter. He even advised not to store toothbrushes near toilet bowls. They even made micro tests on toothbrushes and other surfaces/things near the toilet bowl and found them positive for fecal matter. 

 

Hi Ray,

 

Slightly OT but interesting.

 

Yes Indeed. i have also never seen anyone in a factory cleaning the trigger for flushing the toilet, or the inside doorknob. Maybe solved by gymnastics but i doubt it. :smile:


  • 0

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#12 WayneFiorelli

WayneFiorelli

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 26 posts
  • 6 thanks
1
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 03 November 2015 - 07:48 PM

Years ago, I watched an episode in Oprah where Dr. OZ was talking about poop. He said that when one flushes the toilet, minute poop particles are sent airborne, thus spreading fecal matter. He even advised not to store toothbrushes near toilet bowls. They even made micro tests on toothbrushes and other surfaces/things near the toilet bowl and found them positive for fecal matter. 

 

To add to this, I saw a fecal coliform analysis on an episode of Mythbusters years ago. (I don't know how credible they are, but the study and the science of it seemed legitimate. They discovered that fecal coliforms grew inside a persons house no matter what but were most concentrated in the restroom. They found them in the bedroom, kitchen, hallways, all which were not directly connected to a restroom. 

 

My SQF consultant told me to remove and replace all PPE whenever going to the restroom. It's just a safer practice.


  • 0

Thanked by 1 Member:

#13 JohnWheat

JohnWheat

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 165 posts
  • 56 thanks
12
Good

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norfolk UK
  • Interests:My Children, Motorsports, Film, Rita Ora and Mila Kunis :)

Posted 04 November 2015 - 07:31 AM

We insist that headgear is NOT disturbed from start of shift to end of shift. The general consensus being that loose hair being disturbed. Since introducing we have not had 1complaint or find.  

Bear in mind bump hats and hard hats are also worn.


  • 0

Thanked by 1 Member:

#14 Ray_in_Saudi

Ray_in_Saudi

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 24 posts
  • 3 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Saudi Arabia
    Saudi Arabia

Posted 04 November 2015 - 08:22 AM

@ Mr. WayneFlorelli: Coliforms are everywhere. At home, most likely they are spread by us, humans.  Please check this out

 

http://water.epa.gov...ring/vms511.cfm

 

@ Mr. Charles C. : Indeed it is interesting. I am trying to point our Sir, in an indirect manner that during flushing toilet, personnel uniforms, hairnets, etc can possibly get contaminated with minute fecal matter as per the statements of Dr. Oz.  

 

Cheers,

Ray


  • 0

Thanked by 1 Member:

#15 herdy

herdy

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 29 posts
  • 11 thanks
5
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 05 November 2015 - 06:35 PM

I think it depends on your product and your other GMPs. I work for a food packaging manufacturing plant now (but was a microbiologist by education and previous job - all of that about toilet flushing and fecal colifroms are true: always put the lid down before flushing! You're teeth will thank you) and here, people where their hair nets into the restroom. But I don't have a problem with this because they must clean their hands every single time they touch their hair/ hair net, even while out on the line, and they are very good about this. Our SQF auditor has said nothing about it and we are Level 3 certified with an Excellent score. But, we don't work with a risky product. I could see that if you worked with RTE or didn't have easy access to wash stations, the policy of taking off the hair net may be more useful.


  • 1

Thanked by 1 Member:

#16 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 12,462 posts
  • 3246 thanks
347
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 05 November 2015 - 09:21 PM

@ Mr. WayneFlorelli: Coliforms are everywhere. At home, most likely they are spread by us, humans.  Please check this out

 

http://water.epa.gov...ring/vms511.cfm

 

@ Mr. Charles C. : Indeed it is interesting. I am trying to point our Sir, in an indirect manner that during flushing toilet, personnel uniforms, hairnets, etc can possibly get contaminated with minute fecal matter as per the statements of Dr. Oz.  

 

Cheers,

Ray

 

Hi Ray,

 

Dont forget, as per yr link -

 

There are Coliforms, and then there are fecal Coliforms, albeit it's a slightly out-dated terminology and E.coli is a preferred indicator.


  • 0

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#17 ctzinck

ctzinck

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 62 posts
  • 16 thanks
2
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 17 November 2015 - 05:04 PM

I work for a food packaging converter and we wear our hairnets during the entire shift, if it becomes torn or worn you should change it but we have never addressed changing hairnets after using the restroom, The only PPE we require are hair/beard nets, safety glasses/shields and steel toe boots, otherwise we are in street clothes. if I change my hairnet should i also change my shirt, my pants, should I carry an extra pair of prescription eyeglasses so I can change them too? 

 

as someone stated above it depends on your product risk....


  • 0





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users