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How can I verify that our approved cleaning chemicals are safe for use

chemicals cleaning food safe verification

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#1 Travis Bos -WayFare Foods

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Posted 12 March 2018 - 10:11 PM

We are preparing for our BRC audit and I am looking for advice on how I can have confirmation that the cleaning chemicals we use are suitable for use in a food production facility. We have SDS's for everything, but I'm not sure what else I need to satisfy this part of 4.9.1.1 - Chemical Control. Can anyone give me examples of how you satisfied this BRC requirement? Thanks.


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#2 Charles.C

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 01:01 AM

We are preparing for our BRC audit and I am looking for advice on how I can have confirmation that the cleaning chemicals we use are suitable for use in a food production facility. We have SDS's for everything, but I'm not sure what else I need to satisfy this part of 4.9.1.1 - Chemical Control. Can anyone give me examples of how you satisfied this BRC requirement? Thanks.

 

I assume you are not including sanitising chemicals.

 

IIRC in USA, chemicals of cleaning function should(must?) be included within an officially approved list. I forget the specific jurisdiction but USA members will surely know. I suspect it may relate to the specific product category also, eg whether controlled by FDA or USDA.

Elsewhere IMEX it varies.

Personally i used  "Approved Suplier", a recognised/"reputable" Brand  and required Manufacturer's documentation stating that the cleaning agent is suitable for a food manufacturing environment plus SDS material where available.

Plus an SOP of course.


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Charles.C


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#3 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 03:09 AM

I assume you are not including sanitising chemicals.

 

IIRC in USA, chemicals of cleaning function should(must?) be included within an officially approved list. I forget the specific jurisdiction but USA members will surely know. I suspect it may relate to the specific product category also, eg whether controlled by FDA or USDA.

Elsewhere IMEX it varies.

Personally i used  "Approved Suplier", a recognised/"reputable" Brand  and required Manufacturer's documentation stating that the cleaning agent is suitable for a food manufacturing environment plus SDS material where available.

Plus an SOP of course.

Sanitation chemicals are regulated by EPA as pesticides. "Food grade" status of chemicals is often determined by a combination of FDA (gras listings etc.) and EPA.

 

Frankly, most auditors simply look for "food grade" somewhere on the label or NSF somewhere. 


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#4 Peaches

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 12:32 PM

In addition to the SDS sheets, our auditor asked to see the product information sheets that our chemical supplier gave us for each chemical.  The product information sheet lists out a general description and its approved uses. 

 

EXAMPLE:

QAT-2000

 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

QAT 2000 is a concentrated, four chain, quaternary type sanitizer, fungicide, and deodorizer for use in federally inspected meat and poultry facilities. QAT 2000 is specifically designed for use in food processing institutionswhere housekeeping is of prime importance in controlling the hazard of cross infection or contamination from pathogenic organism. 


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#5 Plastic Ducky

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 01:22 PM

Hi Bostravis,

 

I could be off base here, so I will encourage other experts to weigh my statement, but I think you will also need to demonstrate some verification that the chemicals are being applied correctly. Like an SOP for proper dilution coupled with a dip strip test (with info record) and SOP stating only trained individuals are allowed access to the chemicals.

 

As an example, here at my current facility, (SQF)  we use a food grade Quaternary sanitizer (that is on the approved chemical list), that is controlled in a lockable cabinet, Quat test strips to verify it is diluted correctly (too strong and it is toxic not strong enough and it is not sanitizing) and only trained personnel are allowed to prepare and use the chemical.

 

Good luck, you are in the right place for professional insight.


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#6 Charles.C

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 01:39 PM

Having finally just read BRC 4.9.1.1, the minimum requirements seem fairly self-explicit -

Processes shall be in place to manage the use, storage and handling of non-food chemicals to prevent chemical contamination. These shall include as a minimum:

•  an approved list of chemicals for purchase
•  availability of material safety data sheets and specifications
•  confirmation of suitability for use in a food-processing environment
•  avoidance of strongly scented products
•  the labelling and/or identification of containers of chemicals at all times
•  a designated storage area with restricted access to authorised personnel
•  use by trained personnel only.

 

 

I suppose the maximum is "unlimited" and could include detailed usage (=use/handling?) although such is probably already covered elsewhere in BRC, eg 2.2.1


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#7 Angela5555

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 11:35 AM

Hi,

 

The chemical supplier should be able to confirm that the products used are food safe (evidence is always required)

Please note, some of the chemicals used within the industry which are supplied by various names such as Ecolab, Holchem etc. are actually approved by retailers (see various retailer CoPs). In addition, all the suppliers have specific work instructions and these provide clear guidelines on how the chemicals should be used and handled i.e. contact time, concentration, rinsing required, temp of rinse water, frequency etc. 

All suppliers should already be on your approved supplier list and this includes service providers such as chemical, pest control etc

 

Good luck


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#8 thatparksgal

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 09:40 PM

Either the SDS, the Technical Data Sheet, or the product Label will state that the product is approved for use in food production facilities or for use on food contact surfaces. You will have to have verification that your chemical is being applied at the proper concentration though.


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#9 redfox

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Posted 11 April 2018 - 06:53 AM

Hello,

 

Don't forget to have somebody in you company has the training on chemical handling, and it is cascaded to all chemical handlers, if that chemical handlers has not attended training/seminars about chemical handling and preparation. 

 

regards,

redfox


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