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vin

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 01:56 PM

Dear All,

Gorgonzola cheese, blue cheese etc have a fungal flora. My question is, is it safet to eat as raw?

i tried google search but didnt find the answer.

Please help me to solve the problem

Thanks



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Posted 15 March 2009 - 10:51 AM

Dear All,

Gorgonzola cheese, blue cheese etc have a fungal flora. My question is, is it safet to eat as raw?

i tried google search but didnt find the answer.

Please help me to solve the problem

Thanks

BUMP for Vin.

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Madam A. D-tor

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 08:47 PM

Gorgonzola cheese, blue cheese etc have a fungal flora. My question is, is it safet to eat as raw?


Dear Vin,

did you mean to write "safer" or "safe"

Kind Regards,

Madam A. D-tor

vin

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 04:23 AM

Dear All,

Sorry for the mistake. it is "safe".

Thanks.



Charles.C

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 10:32 AM

Dear Vin,

Well, personally I don’t like the flavour, but if you are an appropriate consumer as defined by a (properly designed / implemented) manufacturing HACCP plan plus all post-manufacturing steps hv been similarly well-controlled, the risk should be low (zero is unfortunately not an option).

One example -
http://www.sciencedi...1f2f75199a3ff42


A negative conclusion is if you are female / pregnant -
http://www.choice.co...mp;title=Cheese
(interesting website for general opinions on when to throw food away or otherwise)
Similarly - http://www.specialty...Article?id=1841

There are probably some more recent classifications in terms of “frequency of food incidents” if you search around a bit which may answer yr question in a more statistically accurate way.

Blue cheese enthusiasts may hv more positive news ??

Rgds / Charles.C

Added – and if yr next question is something like “how can the consumer know about the HACCP ability of the manufacturer – this is satisfied by retailer’s requiring manufacturers to obtain certification to various regulatory / private standards, eg BRC (and via their own approval procedures). For many sellers such certification is now mandatory.

added2 - and for yr probable next question - Eventually you hv to trust somebody plus the end of the line hv (in many locations) direct legal responsibilities to the consumer. :smile:


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


vin

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 09:02 AM

Dear Charles,

Thanks for the information. But i think, i made some confusion.

My question is not regarding the bacterial hazard in the cheese. There is a natural flora of mold on some cheese (that makes the cheese special). And the storage condition of that particular cheese is chilled.

Now my question is, can we eat the cheese as raw (i am concerned about the mold growth on and in the cheese).

please help me to solve the problem

thanks & regards



MRios

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 02:44 PM

Hello Vin.
I´m not a cheese specialist but I´m sure that most blue cheese and other types of aged cheese are eaten raw.
When you have foods that require bacteria or fungi (like cheese, yogurt, some types of cured hams)as part of the process, these organisms are not detrimental to your health. Some of these organisms are even considered good for your health, like the probiotics that are advertised as a plus in some yogurts. These bacteria or fungi usually outnumber and therefore inhibit the growth of pathogens.
They say that there are at least 365 types of cheese in France. What distinguishes one from another is probably the type of bacteria used to age them. Somebody from France, Italy, Switzerland or other "cheese renowned" country have an opinion?



Charles.C

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 07:42 PM

Dear Vin,

Sorry for confusion. In fact yr basic question is very frequent on the net.

According to the links below, the (designed) mold on blue cheese is safe to eat. Mold on other cheeses may or may not be safe.

http://www.foodtv.ca...ategory=Recipes
http://answers.yahoo...08060252AAZmDfM
http://www.scienceup...p?date=20080828
http://whatscookinga.../CheeseMold.htm

But there have been significant documented problems from the group of cheeses which includes blue cheese due to pathogenic bacteria, particularly L.monocytogenes. Hence my previous post.

If you are interested, the subject of cheese has a very wide historical and technical scope, eg –
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheese

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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Posted 18 March 2009 - 01:17 AM

My question is not regarding the bacterial hazard in the cheese. There is a natural flora of mold on some cheese (that makes the cheese special). And the storage condition of that particular cheese is chilled.

Now my question is, can we eat the cheese as raw (i am concerned about the mold growth on and in the cheese).

please help me to solve the problem

thanks & regards


Dear VIN...

IMO... First you have to know what is MOLD ? is it like Sacharomyces sp ?.. after that you have to know is it toxic material produced by mold or is the mold danger for human?
is possible the cheese have another pathogenic micro ?

So.. You can answer the above question.. and you can decide is safe to eat raw cheese or no ...

Hope can help you...

Edited by AS NUR, 18 March 2009 - 01:19 AM.


vin

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 05:52 PM

Dear All,

i have got the way clear, thanks for the light :thumbup:

Thanks Charles



YongYM

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 04:08 AM

To vin:

I learned a little bit on cheese products before. From what I know is, the blue vein cheese for example, is intentionally inoculated with specific 'mould' in order to develop the characteristic appearance and aroma. So, it is safe for consumption.

Any comment from the rest if I am wrong.


Yong





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