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Measuring packaging colour


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#1 rosie

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 03:26 PM

Hi There

Does anyone have experience of measuring the colour of plastic packaging specifically tanslucency. We are currently doing a visual only.

Any help appreciated. Thanks



#2 Simon

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 07:26 PM

Hi There

Does anyone have experience of measuring the colour of plastic packaging specifically tanslucency. We are currently doing a visual only.

Any help appreciated. Thanks

Hi Rosie, What you need is a spectrophotometer. Do I sound clever? Well I'm not I just know how to use google pretty well. :-)

Here is a good explanation:
What is a spectrophotometer

No idea of the cost but here are a few possible suppliers of Spectrophotometers and related equipment.

Hope this helps.

Regards,
Simon

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#3 AS NUR

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 01:19 AM

IMEX. i use Chromameter to analysis Color.. the instrument will give you the result as value of your color .. that more objective then visually...



#4 okido

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Posted 22 April 2009 - 02:49 PM

I test colours of printing on polymer packaging by naked eye.
Comparing them with colour guides and samples works satisfactory.
Measurement equipment proves to be rather difficult with polymer packaging material for paper it works fine.
Let a potential supplier show that the equipment is working according your requests.

Have a nice day, Okido



#5 rosie

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Posted 25 April 2009 - 03:49 PM

Thanks for the feedback. I have used a spectophotometer in the past for measuring colour of a liquid food sample where you prepared a standard, set up the machine to read this as 100% and then put the sample through and got an answer as say 99.4% or 100.7%. Spec was 98% - 102%. This was for coca-cola. Just wanted to know if anyone actually used colour measurement in practice for PP or PS packages to know how it worked.

Rosie.



#6 Hongyun

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Posted 25 April 2009 - 11:41 PM

Hi Rosie,

Like you and okido, I used to check those polymers by eye too. But if say an important customer of your's require data/numeric figures for the color and translucency of your plastic, you can check out Simon's link of spectrophotometers for translucent solids.

First on the list seems like what you need.
http://www.foodonlin...photometer-0002
http://www.hunterlab...anslucent3.html



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