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#1 tsmith7858

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 12:54 PM

We are working on an annual review of our cGMPs and are looking to clarify a statement that was made in the current revision. The statement is





  • No perfume or cologne is permitted to be worn by employees


  • Unscented deodorants are recommended
We do not enforce the first part of the statement and it was originally written because we had products that were prone to absorb odors (There was a story of one product that when the bag was open it smelled of perfume from a person involved in production).

We still have some products that will absorb odors but we don't strongly enforce this rule anymore because there is not as much issue. The problem is coming up with a statement that says "you odor is to strong" (good or bad) without offending.

We came up with this revision so far:



  • Employees should not emit any strong odors which may impact the product quality


  • Unscented deodorants are recommended
I think the statement is better but I also think that "emit any strong odors" could be taken as odors of the gaseuos type which is not the major concern.

Does the statement make it clear enough that strong "pleasant" (perfumes, colognes) or "unpleasant" (uncleanliness) odors are both an issue?

I am looking for any thoughts or if anyone has a written statement or policy that they currently use that could help.

Thanks!







#2 Kamwenji Njuma

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 01:20 PM

Hi,
In our company hygiene rule no.3 says,

"Excessive perfume or aftershave shall not be worn"

I hope this rule is a polite way to ensure personnel avoid perfumes.

Regards,
Jeremy
Kenya



#3 tsmith7858

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 01:32 PM

Thanks Jeremy. I think your statement covers the excessive "coverings" but often people wear them to cover their personal body odors which can be just as strong and can also impact prodcut quality.

How do you handle body odors?



#4 tsmith7858

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 03:31 PM

I spent the morning "googling" and found that Libraries and Medical Practices seem to have the best hygiene statements available. I also found that there are many discussions on Body Odors on Human Resource sites and many caution to the language used in any hygiene statements.

Based on what I have found. I have come up wiht the following for review:

Strong odors may be absorbed by product so employees must be physically clean, well groomed, and take steps to prevent and/or address problems of offensive odors such as body odor, cigarette or cigar smoke, etc. while avoiding excessive use of fragrances


OR…

Offensive body odor due to poor personal hygiene, overpowering perfume, aftershave, or cologne that impacts the quality of product is prohibited.

OR…

No employee shall have an offensive odor that can impact product quality through absorption. An offensive body odor may result from a lack of good hygiene, from an excessive application of a fragrant aftershave or cologne or from other causes

Any thoughts on these statements?


#5 Simon

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 07:37 AM

Dear TSmith, I will have to keep this short as I'm using my mobile. I prefer Number 2 as it is concise and straight to the point. A sensitive subject - great question.

Regards,
Simon


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#6 MRios

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 02:05 PM

I agree with Simon. Our GMP´s include requiring everyone to take a shower daily, so body odors are not a big problem. They´re also required to not wear any cologne or perfume.



#7 tsmith7858

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 07:41 PM

I agree with Simon. Our GMP´s include requiring everyone to take a shower daily, so body odors are not a big problem. They´re also required to not wear any cologne or perfume.



Interesting requirement on showering, but how are you able to verify/enforce it?

I do not think we would get away with that statement in a litgation happy culture like ours.

We settled with a combination of the first and third statements mostly because the first statement included the "why".

Strong odors may be absorbed by product so employees must be physically clean, well groomed, and take steps to prevent and/or address problems of offensive odors due to personal hygiene, overpowering perfume, after shave or cologne.


#8 Madam A. D-tor

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 12:17 PM

Dear TSmith,

I think all 3 (now 4) statements are really good. They do say much more than the common "Excessive perfume or aftershave shall not be worn".


Kind Regards,

Madam A. D-tor

#9 Simon

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Posted 23 August 2009 - 06:39 PM

Interesting requirement on showering, but how are you able to verify/enforce it?

I do not think we would get away with that statement in a litgation happy culture like ours.

We settled with a combination of the first and third statements mostly because the first statement included the "why".

Strong odors may be absorbed by product so employees must be physically clean, well groomed, and take steps to prevent and/or address problems of offensive odors due to personal hygiene, overpowering perfume, after shave or cologne.

I agree with the importance of communicating the "WHY" - good choice. I also agree that being specific e.g. requiring daily showering is maybe a step too far in the UK - what happens if you do not have a shower? or maybe you have a skin condition like psoriasis or eczema (aggrevated by water). I would do what TSmith has done and make the policy and requirements clear and let the workers work out how to comply with it.

Regards,
Simon

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#10 Charles.C

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 11:27 PM

Dear All,

I do not think we would get away with that statement in a litgation happy culture like ours.


Indeed, and this is only part of the (maybe geograpically oriented) problems. The aspect of infringement of personal rights may also overlap. I recall another thread here containing a detailed Australian Union directive as to the mutually agreed factory management controls over body jewelry. Similar issues to present thread unless you can prove a specific safety/quality risk. This is one reason why it is occasionally pragmatic to avoid too much explanation. ;)

I have also seen a similar conclusion to the recommended ones here being quoted as used in various US fast food restaurants for the counter employees. Whether it is followed / enforced is another matter.

Rgds / Charles.C

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#11 GMO

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 11:26 AM

I have to admit in GMP training I skirt around the issue and talk about the importance of personal hygiene, being clean and presentable not just for hygiene reasons but because we want to proudly show off our factory to visitors.



#12 GMO

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Posted 09 October 2009 - 02:29 PM

I've used the attached cartoon before as a discussion starter in training about trying to think about "how would our customers feel if they could see, hear and smell us when we're working?"

Attached Files



#13 Jean

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 05:52 AM

IMO, it is easy to write in a simple and a specific way as mentioned in the previous posts. The tough part is to ensure it is followed and implemented at work. Training helps with attractive pictures or movies as GMO mentioned, but for some time..(from experience).

To be practical, I call the staff in person who was found violating the written rules and talk straight in a polite way with a smile and a wink. The same goes with hand washing after the using the wash rooms....I tell the person knows that he/she was being observed by other colleagues...it works.


Best regards,

J

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#14 AS NUR

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 08:53 AM

as same asa GMO.. i use picture during GMP training to inform that "your smell" can be contaminant to product..



#15 Jamima68

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 08:20 PM

Hi All,

Has anyone ever had the experience of having to discipline a staff member for excessive body odour? If so how did you tackle this?

Cheers
J9



#16 Simon

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 05:04 PM

Hi All,

Has anyone ever had the experience of having to discipline a staff member for excessive body odour? If so how did you tackle this?

Cheers
J9

The best way is to tell it exactly as it is. Don't dress it up or go around the houses. Sit down one to one to discuss only this one topic. In a matter of fact and calm way, but with a caring manner.

Just my opinion, maybe others have a different method. :dunno:

Not easy though.

Regards,
Simon

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#17 Abdul Qudoos

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Posted 29 November 2009 - 04:59 AM

Greetings for the day,

It should clearly mention in policy/procedure for 'personal hygiene' and shift supervisor should inspect before entering to production.

Policy: All food handlers’ employees will maintain good personal hygiene practices to ensure food safety.

Procedure:

All employees must arrive at work clean – clean hair, teeth brushed, bath and use light odor deodorant daily.

It is the responsibility of the shift supervisor to inspect employees when they report to work to be sure they are following proper hygiene requirements.


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#18 Kamwenji Njuma

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 09:34 AM

I support Simon, to avoid humiliting the staff resposible,you should have a one on one talk with the person and advice him or her on the importance of personal hygiene,try to understand if its negligence or medical condition(some people has blood condition making them have body odours) and cleanliness and encourage the staff to follow the rules and sign the training and hygiene rules/induction record.Incase of no change,displinary action is recommended according to your company policy.

Regards,
Jeremy



#19 tsmith7858

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 02:02 PM

I have had to have the conversation with an employee at a previous place of employment. As Simon said, a one on one that is straight and to the point is the best way. The person I discussed it with was appreciative and reacted well. I am sure that is not always the case.

I know the discussion has happened where I work now which is why I needed guidance on this issue. The last time it happened was actually someone who wore to much perfume. It is tough enough to discuss hygiene when someone is dirty but when they consider themselves clean and enjoy their perfume it can become a personal preference issue.

TS



#20 Simon

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 02:55 PM

I agree with Abdul that if the supervisor is doing his / her job properly it should be dealt with as it arises and not become an issue for a sit down at a later date.

Whenever it is addressed the important point is that it is simply business and not a personal issue. If the rules / policy are clear then there can be no argument.

Simon


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#21 Jean

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Posted 01 December 2009 - 06:41 AM

What can we do about people who take a shower before work but gets a bad odour after working for 4-5 hours due to the sweat. This is the problem I frequently encounter. "Perfumes are not to be used in food preparation areas due to the taint".


Best regards,

J

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#22 Simon

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Posted 01 December 2009 - 09:31 AM

What can we do about people who take a shower before work but gets a bad odour after working for 4-5 hours due to the sweat. This is the problem I frequently encounter. "Perfumes are not to be used in food preparation areas due to the taint".

You could make them work part time. No seriously you make a very good point jean. Sometimes it is not a personal hygiene problem but a medical issue which sort of opens up a whole new can of deodorant.

Where this is the case what could be the best solution?

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#23 Saviour

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Posted 01 December 2009 - 10:03 AM

In that case we should look out possible reasons of sweating during working hours..
It may be the temperature or humidity in plant or may be other reasons..
If external factors are creating this situation, one must look for the solutions to avoid such situations.

As GMO said pictures have always last long effects on the trainees.. with that in my training programs I always correlate personal health, growth, creativity, happiness apart from requirements to work in food manufacturing/ processing premises.

Since personal wellness attracts attention of trainees more than the requirement of the factory, they take more interest to listen the trainer... and simple day to day examples works to accelerate the understanding of the system.



When trainees get the feel that consciously or unconsciously how they are following or not following hygienic practices in home and correlation of results with scientific reasons, they become more concern on such issues.

The key is how you program their mind to get the expected results..

Regards



#24 Jean

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 06:52 AM

In that case we should look out possible reasons of sweating during working hours..
It may be the temperature or humidity in plant or may be other reasons..



Dear Saviour,



The people who sweat a lot work indoors and outdoors and it is because of the climatic conditions, skin problems (like psoriasis), poor lifestyle, due to the hormonal / medicines, mental state like anger, nervousness, even some foods rich in lecithin or choline etc…These are some which we cannot control cent percent.



We train our staff with pictures and examples too in all subjects and IMEX, they impact may last maybe a month or so and they go back to their old ways, not in my presence. I get few complaints from other mangers, supervisors sometimes from their colleagues during the training sessions. Our working environment is temperature and humidity controlled almost 24 hours (including the lockers and corridors).



If external factors are creating this situation, one must look for the solutions to avoid such situations.




Can you give some ideas of different factors and solutions from your mind and experience?



When trainees get the feel that consciously or unconsciously how they are following or not following hygienic practices in home and correlation of results with scientific reasons, they become more concern on such issues.

The key is how you program their mind to get the expected results..



This is easy if it is with hygiene issues but with respect to the above conditions we need to analyze each person for different factors causing bad odour and then get their mind into is a bit tough.
Best regards,

J

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