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Using Duct Tape as a Temporary Engineering Fix


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Pa-aaron

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Posted 25 May 2010 - 04:37 PM

Hi all. I did a search for duct tape and didn't find much on the topic and I would like to get a few other opinions. The closest information that I found was an FDA report writing someone up for using it on a food contact surface, but we would use it only for temporary repairs on non-food contact surfaces.

How do we feel about duct tape as a temporary measure? I do not see anything that explicitly forbids it, though I know many people try to prevent its use. My thought was to mitigate the risk by dating the tape when it is applied and removing it after a month.



Simon

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Posted 25 May 2010 - 05:32 PM

Hi all. I did a search for duct tape and didn't find much on the topic and I would like to get a few other opinions. The closest information that I found was an FDA report writing someone up for using it on a food contact surface, but we would use it only for temporary repairs on non-food contact surfaces.

How do we feel about duct tape as a temporary measure? I do not see anything that explicitly forbids it, though I know many people try to prevent its use. My thought was to mitigate the risk by dating the tape when it is applied and removing it after a month.

I doubt duct tape is food grade, it is very strong though. I would say it was perfectly acceptable on non food contact surfaces as a temporary fix. I think dating it is a good idea. You might want to consider having some sort of log including when, where, when, who, why applied and date removed and by whom. Maybe a photo alongside.

No problem at all with something more or less like the above as it demonstrates control. The one thing I would have issue with is how much temporary engineering was used in the factory and how long a temporary fix stayed temporary. I think a month is far too long.

Welcoem to the forums Pa-aaron.

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tsmith7858

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Posted 25 May 2010 - 06:58 PM

I doubt duct tape is food grade, it is very strong though. I would say it was perfectly acceptable on non food contact surfaces as a temporary fix. I think dating it is a good idea. You might want to consider having some sort of log including when, where, when, who, why applied and date removed and by whom. Maybe a photo alongside.

No problem at all with something more or less like the above as it demonstrates control. The one thing I would have issue with is how much temporary engineering was used in the factory and how long a temporary fix stayed temporary. I think a month is far too long.

Welcoem to the forums Pa-aaron.



Not sure if it is a regulation anywhere but we do not allow duct tape in our facility at all. I would agree with Simon that it definately is not food grade and should not be on food contact surfaces.

Marking any temporary repair is a good idea and is required in some standards (such as AIB Consolidated Standards).


Pa-aaron

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 03:26 PM

Simon, tsmith...Thank you for the comments. We are at least 1-2 levels up the supply chain from the food processing, so trying to create food safety that is not total overkill in time, implementation or cost proves interesting at times.



Madam A. D-tor

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 09:19 PM

Hi Pa Aaron

I also have no troubles with duct (or any other) tape as long as there is no food contact.

However I do have troubles with temporary repairs. To solve temporary repairs as soon as possible is a requirement in BRC and IFS. It is indirectly a requirement in ISO 9001 with regards to corrective actions and provision of infrastructure.
This so called tape maintenance (but t-wraps are also often used) should be prevented. To set a deadline for the use of the tape can do the trick. Please make sure that the person s responsible do not only replace the out-of-date tape but that there is a structural solution to the defect. Maybe a list with all the temporary repairs and the way to solve the defects can help. This list can be discussed with management for investments and/or priority settings.

I agree with Simon that 1 month seems quite long.

Succes


Kind Regards,

Madam A. D-tor

Charles.C

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 10:51 PM

Dear All,

Yes, if I understand the terminology correctly, it's very popular with engineers for binding insulation around refrigerant fluid lines. I hv often wondered what the chemical adhesive used is as I watched the condensation dripping down, hopefully into a waste exit line. In fact I once rejected a room of a factory where the drips were straight onto the tables !

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Jay T

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 11:31 PM

Not worth the risk. Allergen, pests harborage, etc. What if the part of the date came loose? I like the idea to use it for day or two only till the new part(s) arrive.



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Posted 02 June 2010 - 03:15 AM

Hi all. I did a search for duct tape and didn't find much on the topic and I would like to get a few other opinions. The closest information that I found was an FDA report writing someone up for using it on a food contact surface, but we would use it only for temporary repairs on non-food contact surfaces.

How do we feel about duct tape as a temporary measure? I do not see anything that explicitly forbids it, though I know many people try to prevent its use. My thought was to mitigate the risk by dating the tape when it is applied and removing it after a month.



The use of duct tape for temporary repairs is a mind set. I have worked in places where the engineers seemed to carry duct tape around instead of tools!Posted Image

I personally object strongly to its use, I don't really want an engineer deciding where it is okay to use from a food safety perspective. I can accept its use as an emergency temporary repair providing any risk of contaminating the product is minimal. Also temporary means fix permanently asap right? Not next month more like at the end of production.

Regards,

Tony


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Posted 20 January 2011 - 03:51 PM

Dear All,

Yes, if I understand the terminology correctly, it's very popular with engineers for binding insulation around refrigerant fluid lines. I hv often wondered what the chemical adhesive used is as I watched the condensation dripping down, hopefully into a waste exit line. In fact I once rejected a room of a factory where the drips were straight onto the tables !

Rgds / Charles.C



Charles-
I have a question for you concerning condensation..... What is your stance on condensation that is diverted through a hose to the floor?


Foodworker

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 10:59 AM

I would resist allowing condensate from chillers and air conditioning units to fall directly onto the floor in a food handling environment as strongly as possible.

The pipe and hoses are often poorly designed ( why do engineers put a 'U' bend on a condensate line?) and very difficult to clean and sanitise.

They then become a breeding pond for all sorts of nasties. I have picked up Listeria mono or more than one occasion in a condensate line. Allowing this to drip straight on the floor is asking for trouble.


Edited by Foodworker, 22 January 2011 - 10:59 AM.


Charles.C

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 10:39 AM

Dear welo,

I have a question for you concerning condensation..... What is your stance on condensation that is diverted through a hose to the floor?


By "floor" do you mean directly onto the floor or fed (eg PVC piping} into a, countersunk, drainage line. The latter is the typical preferred method IMEX.

There used to be associated worries over Legionella but seems internal AC units (not relying on the evaporation of water for the cooling effect) are not considered so much risk these days (not really my field, did a quick google :smile: ).

Rgds / Charles.C

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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