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#1 Inesa

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Posted 17 October 2010 - 07:44 PM

Dear all,

I'm a student and I'm doing an assignment about cleaning and disinfection programmes for cooked ham producing factory. According to a book I found in the library, the most suitable sanitizers in meat industry are those: chlorine containing, active iodine solutions, the quaternary ammonium compounds (Quats) and acid sanitizers. Then there is suggested that organic disinfectants should be used in cleaning slaughter area.

Can anyone tell me:
1- what is a difference between organic and inorganic disinfectants? Why it's organic dis. that should be used for slaughter area?
2- what single kind of disinfectant to choose? (I'm thinking about choosing chlorine containing or Quats. Which is better? )

I have it difficult to find information for this topic... Would be great if anyone could explain me this.

Thank You in advance

Inesa


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#2 Simon

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Posted 19 October 2010 - 01:02 PM

Can anyone help Inesa with this project?


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#3 Inesa

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Posted 20 October 2010 - 06:43 PM

Hi again Posted Image

I've been searching for the answer different places, even asking professional people selling cleaners. It seems that only chemistry engineers might be able to explain about the difference between organic and inorganic disinfectants.

The book, that suggests to clean slaughter area with organic disinfectants, without explaining it more detailed and confusing us-poor students, is called "Principles of Food Sanitation". 3rd ed. Norman G. Marriott. 1994.New York. p.249. ISBN 0-412-05501-5
Otherwise it's a good book to get some basic information about cleaning and sanitation programmes in different food producing factories.

Admin, thanks for trying to help me Posted Image Posted Image

Best regards
Inesa


Just as appetite comes by eating, so work brings inspiration, if inspiration is not discernible at the beginning. (Igor Stravinsky)

#4 Mike Green

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Posted 21 October 2010 - 10:05 AM

Hi again Posted Image

I've been searching for the answer different places, even asking professional people selling cleaners. It seems that only chemistry engineers might be able to explain about the difference between organic and inorganic disinfectants.

The book, that suggests to clean slaughter area with organic disinfectants, without explaining it more detailed and confusing us-poor students, is called "Principles of Food Sanitation". 3rd ed. Norman G. Marriott. 1994.New York. p.249. ISBN 0-412-05501-5
Otherwise it's a good book to get some basic information about cleaning and sanitation programmes in different food producing factories.

Admin, thanks for trying to help me Posted Image Posted Image

Best regards
Inesa

from the fish industry and old-ish(2005)-but might help with some background?
sanitising efficiency
I may sound like a complete idiot...but actually there are a couple of bits missing

#5 Charles.C

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Posted 21 October 2010 - 12:40 PM

Dear Inesa,

I'm not a meat person but do have some chemistry. :smile:

Yes Marriott is pretty good IMO although yr ed. is getting a bit old? :smile:

I am guessing that the “organic chlorine” (OC) sanitizer is a chlorinated isocyanurate. This has known advantages over the inorganic varieties such as corrosion characteristics but I have not seen any specific references to an advantage in the slaughtering step. It is mentioned in Marriott 2006 ed. although in the meat chapter I only see references to “OC”. Google has plenty of info on it. Other popular organic sanitizers are things like organic acids / peroxy acid but these do not normally self-generate hypochlorous hypochlorite :oops: ions / available chlorine as also mentioned. :smile:

Here are some links / attachments which you may find interesting –

http://ohioline.osu....-fact/0013.html

http://helid.desastr...s2910e/8.1.html

http://www.alibaba.c...C_CHEMICAL.html

http://www.spraychem...c-sanitizer.php

http://www.thepoultr...oultry-industry

http://www.trustwate...markets/careers

Attached File  meat process extract.png   722.22KB   13 downloads

Attached File  assessment sodium dichloroisocyanurate in broiler carcass - 11025033.pdf   561.27KB   29 downloads

Attached File  (approx 1985) cleaning Operations_and_control_09-85.pdf   466.5KB   63 downloads

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#6 Inesa

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Posted 22 October 2010 - 06:51 PM

Dear Mike Green and Charles,

thanks for helping me! I can use every paper and explanation, because I want to be the best expert in this cleaning and sanitation branch Posted Image Posted Image Though It's still a long way to go... Posted Image

Best regards from Inesa Posted Image

p.s. Our library unfortunately doesn't have later versions of Marriott books or others of same kind. But I'll have to find and buy the latest version, cause this is a subject I'm falling in love with.


Just as appetite comes by eating, so work brings inspiration, if inspiration is not discernible at the beginning. (Igor Stravinsky)

#7 Charles.C

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Posted 23 October 2010 - 01:30 AM

Dear Inesa,

Thks yr comments.

This topic is obviously under constant testing of new ideas due to its practical importance and degree of difficulty. It is also possible that a method attributed to Stopforth involving peroxyacetic acid (see note in attached pic.) is the source of yr original post but only guessing. (Added - but presumably not if additional mention of Available Chlorine is mentioned in yr original reference :smile: )

Attached File  meat1.png   236.3KB   18 downloads

Rgds / Charles.C

PS you can find many condensed versions of useful textbooks as "Google books"


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#8 Bo Smith

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 10:22 PM

I work in a meat processing plant. We used chlorine, quats, and acid based sanitizers.

1. Chlorine--this is probably the least used for sanitizing at our facility. We used a chlorine based cleaner during the cleaning phase. If the sanitation is done properly, this cleaner should kill most of the bacteria.
2. Quats- This is probably our most used. If I remember correctly, it has the longest residual effect. It also is probably has the least potential to damage surfaces over the long term.
3. We use an Ecolab product called Vortexx. It's a peracetic acid based compound. Of these 3, it is the strongest oxidizer--meaning it ruptures the cell walls of bacteria fast. It is also excellent to use to remove biofilms. It's also the most expensive of these 3 and has a very strong pungent odor that bothers some people. One should be careful in mixing it, as too high of a concentration will effect everyone in the area.



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#9 corybaron

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 04:24 PM

Also: be sure that they are NSF certified (in the White Book) if you are working with food contact surfaces (National Sanitation Foundation: listing of Proprietary Substances and Nonfood Compounds)

Cheers,
-Cory






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