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#1 mexicorn

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 06:07 AM

Was wondering if anyone would be able to assist me here....
We are in the process of making a black bean dip.
All very new in South Africa. At the moment we are unable to retort as this is still in the developmental stage here in Africa.
The existing pH of the black beans is 5.
I would like some advice as to how i can bring this pH down to a level of about 3/3.5.
I have attempted using fumeric & citric acid but both affect the flavour in small quantities.
Anyone have any suggestions as to what i could do.
Please help out... any advice would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks
Carla



#2 Simon

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Posted 15 December 2010 - 04:10 PM

BUMP for Mexicorn.


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#3 Mike Green

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Posted 15 December 2010 - 08:46 PM

Was wondering if anyone would be able to assist me here....
We are in the process of making a black bean dip.
All very new in South Africa. At the moment we are unable to retort as this is still in the developmental stage here in Africa.
The existing pH of the black beans is 5.
I would like some advice as to how i can bring this pH down to a level of about 3/3.5.
I have attempted using fumeric & citric acid but both affect the flavour in small quantities.
Anyone have any suggestions as to what i could do.
Please help out... any advice would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks
Carla


hopefully the attached doc may be of some use

Regards

Mike

Attached Files


I may sound like a complete idiot...but actually there are a couple of bits missing

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#4 AS NUR

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Posted 16 December 2010 - 06:08 AM

Was wondering if anyone would be able to assist me here....
We are in the process of making a black bean dip.
All very new in South Africa. At the moment we are unable to retort as this is still in the developmental stage here in Africa.
The existing pH of the black beans is 5.
I would like some advice as to how i can bring this pH down to a level of about 3/3.5.
I have attempted using fumeric & citric acid but both affect the flavour in small quantities.
Anyone have any suggestions as to what i could do.
Please help out... any advice would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks
Carla



Dear Carla..

May be you can try to use Lactic acid.. as I know Lactic acid is not affect to aroma or taste..

rgds

AS Nur

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#5 Hongyun

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Posted 20 December 2010 - 02:13 PM

Dear Carla..

May be you can try to use Lactic acid.. as I know Lactic acid is not affect to aroma or taste..

rgds

AS Nur



Hi AS Nur,

Lactic acid when used at a small amount may not cause a significant change in taste, but if Carla's going to decrease the beans from pH 5 to 3, I think it will still be too sour, unless more sugar is added to divert the lingering sourness...

Hi Carla,

You might want to look at other forms of preservatives if you do not want to change the taste by reducing the pH. Or maybe hot filling of your product in a sterile enviornment to minimize the possibility of food spoilage?

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#6 MRios

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 05:40 PM



Oh my goodness! I know that food safety is first and foremost on your mind and that´s probably why you want to bring the pH down so low, but I would go with Hongyun´s advice about hot filling in a hot environment.
With a name like Mexicorn, I think your idea is to present your consumers with a Mexican taste. Guatemala is Mexico´s southern neighbor, with whom we share many recipes, so even though I don´t know about industrial production of black beans, as a daily consumer of this staple, please allow me to make some observations. Acid tasting beans would signify spoilage for us; likewise, sweet beans are unheard of in this part of the world. Once, I did try some US produced beans that were sweet and it´s an experience I do not want to repeat. (Well, there is one Guatemalan recipe that calls for sweet refried beans: rellenitos, which is a mashed plaintain ball filled with sweet beans and then fried.)
The whole process of boiling the beans until they are soft enough to be edible, and then cooking them to make a paste (for dip, as you say) would do away with any bacteria. Packing in airtight containers should do the trick. Local producers pack the beans in cans or pouches. I´d be more worried about rancidity from the oil used to make the paste, than with any bacterial issues.

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