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Control of microbial toxin in food by using bacteriocin


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raffay

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Posted 01 April 2011 - 05:32 PM

hello great scientist i need your support actually i want to work for preservation of food and my focus is destruction of microbial toxin by the use of bacteriocin, anybody of you who has any idea or literature related to that topic kindly reply.

I waiting for you precious response

regard
raffay



Abdul Qudoos

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 06:10 AM

hello great scientist i need your support actually i want to work for preservation of food and my focus is destruction of microbial toxin by the use of bacteriocin, anybody of you who has any idea or literature related to that topic kindly reply.


Dear raffay, due to busiest schedule i wan unable to reply as soon, it requires free time and efforts to dig the information and post so that the whole world benefits...

Bacteriocins are ubiquitous in nature and clearly serve some critical role, they also possess qualities that can be tapped for a myriad of applied uses. In recent years, bacteriocins have been targeted for use in human health, veterinary medicine, and food preservation (Cleveland et al., 2001; Bower et al., 2004, 2005) They are an attractive focus for drug development because they active against every known human, animal, and plant pathogen existing in nature, they are remarkably stable proteins, and they are not toxic to human cells. The use of the bacteriocin nisin in food production (Breukink and de Kruijff, 1999) lends credence to their perceived promise in human therapy. Nisin is the star of bacteriocins. It is the only bacteriocin allowed as a food additive (E234), recognized as safe (FAO/WHO, 1968), and accepted by the American Food and Drug Administration (1988). In the Food Industry bacteriocins, such as nisin and pediocin, have diverse applications and can be invaluable tools to self protect food in a wide range of applications.

Hope the attached information is sufficient...


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raffay

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 06:08 PM

Abdul Qudoos thanks a lot for you precious time. as you get free and if you get any updated information w.r.t the use of bacteriocin in food industry kindly share it on the forum .
regard
raffay

Dear raffay, due to busiest schedule i wan unable to reply as soon, it requires free time and efforts to dig the information and post so that the whole world benefits...

Bacteriocins are ubiquitous in nature and clearly serve some critical role, they also possess qualities that can be tapped for a myriad of applied uses. In recent years, bacteriocins have been targeted for use in human health, veterinary medicine, and food preservation (Cleveland et al., 2001; Bower et al., 2004, 2005) They are an attractive focus for drug development because they active against every known human, animal, and plant pathogen existing in nature, they are remarkably stable proteins, and they are not toxic to human cells. The use of the bacteriocin nisin in food production (Breukink and de Kruijff, 1999) lends credence to their perceived promise in human therapy. Nisin is the star of bacteriocins. It is the only bacteriocin allowed as a food additive (E234), recognized as safe (FAO/WHO, 1968), and accepted by the American Food and Drug Administration (1988). In the Food Industry bacteriocins, such as nisin and pediocin, have diverse applications and can be invaluable tools to self protect food in a wide range of applications.

Hope the attached information is sufficient...






Thanked by 1 Member:

Carlos Leoncini

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 10:57 PM

Hi. I do not want to sound naive but before attacking the problem with a chemical, shouldn't we review GMP's and other prerequisite programs?. Is this the best option after a robust haccp analysis of your system?. Regards.



Abdul Qudoos

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 12:25 PM


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