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What should be the frequency of high level cleaning?


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#1 Simon

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Posted 14 May 2011 - 06:31 PM

Is there an expected frequency for high level cleaning or does everyone determine it by inspection? I know it depends on the process and propensity for dust, but I just wanted to get a feel for customer and audit standard requirements.

Thanks,
Simon


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#2 Foodworker

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 06:05 PM

This is one of those "how long is a bit of string" questions!

There can never be a single correct frequency, it will depend upon the products made, dust/debris/dirt generated and the design of the building.

In my view there is no point in definining a set frequency. Base the cleaning scheduling upon a suitabe inspection programme.Don't forget to inspect above any suspended ceilings.

To be honest, except in small buildings or rooms I have never come across a defined frequency that has ever been adhered to.



#3 Charles.C

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 04:22 AM

Dear Simon,

A previous related thread below but the responses were unfortunately not too precise -

http://www.ifsqn.com...dpost__p__30661

Hopefully some more numerical opinions this time around :smile:

Rgds / Charles.C


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#4 Simon

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Posted 21 May 2011 - 06:38 PM

This is one of those "how long is a bit of string" questions!

There can never be a single correct frequency, it will depend upon the products made, dust/debris/dirt generated and the design of the building.

In my view there is no point in definining a set frequency. Base the cleaning scheduling upon a suitabe inspection programme.Don't forget to inspect above any suspended ceilings.

To be honest, except in small buildings or rooms I have never come across a defined frequency that has ever been adhered to.

OK, you are auditing my plant and you ask how often we do high level cleaning. From ground level it looks ok, there are no ladders around...but we have never had a high level clean in 20 years. What would would I need to show you to prevent a nonconformity?

Regards,
Simon

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#5 dgsorg

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 05:49 PM

Unless you are talking about a really tall ladder, excessive build up should be visible from the floor. If it is visible, it needs to be cleaned. Perhaps that is the key for each facility. Give it a thorough cleaning and wait for visible build up. Subtract a third of the time between cleaning and visibility and make that your standard period of required cleaning.



#6 Simon

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 09:22 PM

Unless you are talking about a really tall ladder, excessive build up should be visible from the floor. If it is visible, it needs to be cleaned. Perhaps that is the key for each facility. Give it a thorough cleaning and wait for visible build up. Subtract a third of the time between cleaning and visibility and make that your standard period of required cleaning.

Makes logic sense to me dgsorg, although it can be difficult to see high ledges, ceilings, on top of light fittings etc. from the floor.

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#7 Charles.C

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 01:31 AM

Dear Simon,

Should there not be some kind of minimum invoked via aspects like potential pest infestations, eg rats? (20 years almost a certainty of "something" :smile: ). I presume we are not talking about Eiffel tower proportions and there are no cameras up in the rafters.

My experience is (a) many celings are "false" so that electrical reasons prevent in-depth treatment. A record of monthly "inspections" is maintained by engineering climbers via the entry access points .(b) non-false "high' ceilings / lights are not regularly viewed more frequently than 1 time / 3months. Again, the Engineering Dept tend to (unavoidably) hv the most detailed knowledge although not necessarily distributed (eg broken light shields).© other installations it obviously may depend, as per next para also.

Obviously ease of cleaning is a (the?) significant factor. Cold stores are another legend in this respect.

Maybe maintain an inspection log as a 1st defence, + appropriate corrective actions, eg passing the buck to "Verification" :smile:

Rgds / Charles.C


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#8 RMAV

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 05:21 AM

Makes logic sense to me dgsorg, although it can be difficult to see high ledges, ceilings, on top of light fittings etc. from the floor.


I used a "scissor lift" to inspect our ceilings. An audit identified an issue with the ceiling. Of course, I had not the chance to get to it before the audit as I was working on higher risk areas first. Nevertheless, I used a drawing of the facility and divided it into sections categorizing by risk level. I arbitrarily selected frequencies for cleaning and inspection as a starting point. For example, over a higher-risk area I defined the frequency as every other week. Inspections occurred on the off-weeks and also after cleaning to identify areas for improvement or areas we should increase or decrease the frequency. Trial and "error."

In my opinion, ultimately an inspection frequency should be defined, documented, carried out, and recorded if you do not define a cleaning frequency. Justifying the frequency for either takes time and data.

Regards,
RMAV

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#9 GMO

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 07:18 AM

I would approach this from a BRC direction. Everything is 'risk assess, risk assess..." If you never cleaned your ceiling and high level equipment; what would happen?

I would also start at a year, maybe 18 months as your top end of how often if you're processing food or food contact packaging and work back from that. If you were starting to get longer than 18 months as an auditor I would definitely be asking more stretching questions.

As for how you make that decision (and record your risk assessment), I'd approach it like this. I'd do some kind of inspection on a 6 monthly basis (scissor lift perhaps as others have said). Review settle plate or air sampling results. Are they becoming problematic? When you're starting to see evidence of significant dust / debris build up and / or settle plates are showing increases; I would then suggest it's the time to clean.

It might be though that certain areas need cleaning more than others and you might clean areas around air conditioning intake filters more often than ceilings. Generally where there is cardboard packaging a 6-12 monthly ceiling clean is needed IME, where there is open product but very good air changes and filtering, maybe just ever 12 months. If the product however is dusty or contains fine powder, every month might be required (but that would be pretty obvious.)



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