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11 replies to this topic

#1 agwanda

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 12:15 PM

Dear All,

I would wish to know what considerations one needs to make during the design of Rodent Bait Stations in line with ISO 22000:2005 or PAS 220?

Agwanda


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#2 mind over matter

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Posted 02 October 2011 - 03:57 AM

Dear All,

I would wish to know what considerations one needs to make during the design of Rodent Bait Stations in line with ISO 22000:2005 or PAS 220?

Agwanda

I don't have any good advice. But I’d say you may want to define on your map where the insect control can NOT be located. I suppose there are areas off limit and cannot be sprayed or pest control contact, for example, manufacturing area.

It's also important to regularly check the traps but I wouldn't want a productive employee to sit too long with its victim inside....

Some IFSQN members can offer expert advice.

Edited by mind over matter, 06 October 2011 - 10:40 AM.


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#3 Anish

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 09:21 AM

I hope you want to understand the mapping pattern of Bait stations in the factory - If then you have to install it in all the corners and specially where shadow falls as generally the rats movement is most seen in the corner (near the wall) and keep it in equidistance - generally around the factory wall. Regarding Bait Station design, it should be based on the requirement - whether rats are big/small - you will find it with the pest controller and keep only mechanical traps in the production & warehouse areas.

Rgds





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#4 Claudia_QP

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 11:58 AM

Dear All,

I would wish to know what considerations one needs to make during the design of Rodent Bait Stations in line with ISO 22000:2005 or PAS 220?

Agwanda


Hi Agwanda, I am not sure if you are refering to design of bait stations (in paper), the design of each station (material, size) or the places you should put the stations...
Depending on the rodent activity, if you have rodent problems currently or not, if you do you should place the stations at least every ten meters. If it is only something preventive you could put them every 15 meters. Normally outside the stations contains baits, and inside production you use glued cartons, or something similar.
You can buy the stations already made, or make it your self at the company (the maintenance area) with black tubes (100 mm thick, and at least 50 cm long, the borders should have an angle of 45 ° to fix them easily to the wall)
If you only want to know how to draw the map, office visio helps a lot. Posted Image

Edited by guillenclau, 05 October 2011 - 12:00 PM.


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#5 Philips

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 01:43 PM

Agwanda,

Allow me to say this. The number of bait station you need to keep is only identified by hazard analysis, what is the level of rodents infestation on the site? If too high, ahigher number, otherwise few will do. That is the basic consideration on pest control devices. Other standards are however very specific at what distance you need to place the bait stations, but for ISO and its generic nature, its you to decide by following hazards analysis methodologies



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#6 Philips

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 01:46 PM

Agwanda,

Again if it is the design of the bait stations, the various standards will ask for mechanical traps at the entrances, glue type in the production and storage areas and boxies in the outer perimeter. Its you to see what is effective of the site; bottom line is, apply hazards analysis results in determining what you need, how many and how to place them



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#7 mesophile

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 02:08 PM

Hi Agwanda,


You may also need to consider the type of compound used in the bait stations. Those internally, especially in any food prep area for rodents should be non-toxic, however you may find that after your risk assessment you don't need any in these areas anyway.


Regards


Simon



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#8 agwanda

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 09:38 AM

Thanks guys, I do appreciate your inputs and am more enlightened!

We currently have the food processing areas,storage areas and the surroundings to take care of some of which are not well lit and I do think the poorly lit areas might require a higher density of the stations than the rest. Just to interject, do we have any standards or specifications with regard to this that can be shared?

This would equally be complimentary.

Agwanda


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#9 Dr Ajay Shah

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 12:04 PM

Jambo (Hello) Agwanda,

You do not necessarily require to over bait poorly lit up areas. However, you do need to ensure that areas are prpely lit so that you can see if there is any activity by checking for spillages, droppings, etc.

Make sure to have MSDS for all baits used on site and as Mesophile from Cymru (Wales) indicated that you must only use non toxic baits in the processing area for monitoring the activity. Toxic baits must only be applied externally on the walls of the building or fence line.

Regards


Dr Ajay Shah.,
BSc (Hons), MSc, PhD, PGCE(FE)
Managing Director & Principal Consultant
AAS Food Technology Pty Ltd
www.aasfood.com


#10 dgsorg

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 04:00 PM

Agwanda,

One might also note that in some locales it is recommended to use no bait at all in the mechanical traps. The philosophy behind this is that the bait acts as an attractant and actually increases your problem. The method then is to place the mechanical traps in the rodent's pathway (along perimeter walls and areas of visible rodent activity). The rodent will either enter the trap out of convenience to maintain the path, or inquisitiveness.

This allows you to both track and remove rodents without drawing more in from outside the facility.

Regards,
dgsorg



#11 Kamwenji Njuma

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 12:25 PM

Dear Agwanda,

To add,the first step is risk assesment to find the type of rodents found within the premises,their habourages,etc.Then you also need to determine the location of baits or mechanical traps either in production or out of production areas.Then you need to draw a bait map plan showing the location of the baits or traps.Records must be kept to show bait changes and action plans with corrective action activities.Also all baits must have their MSDS.

Regards,
Kamwenji Njuma



#12 Simon

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 08:08 PM

Not sure if anyone has mentioned on the thread; personally I would employ a professional pest control contractor to help with designing the pest management system; whether or not you intend to manage in-house or outsource.

Regards,
Simon


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