Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo

Looking for a magnet cleaning procedure


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 bala_s

bala_s

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 11 posts
  • 4 thanks
0
Neutral

  • India
    India
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 November 2011 - 02:05 PM

Dear Members,


I am looking for magnet clening procedure.
is there any special cleaning methode for magnet which is used in dry ingredients processing/packing line.
in some machine imagnet can be detached but in some processing machine it can't be detached.

please reply.


with regards / bala



#2 Simon

Simon

    IFSQN...it's My Life

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 12,492 posts
  • 1314 thanks
695
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Married to Michelle, Father of three boys (Oliver, Jacob and Louis). I enjoy cycling, walking and travelling, watching sport, especially football and Manchester United. Oh and I love food and beer and wine.

Posted 30 December 2011 - 04:35 PM

Would anybody have a special cleaning procedure for magnets?
Or any advice?


hand-pointing-down.gif
 
Get FREE bitesize education with IFSQN webinar recordings.
 
Download this handy excel for desktop access to over 140 Food Safety Friday's webinar recordings.
https://www.ifsqn.com/fsf/Free%20Food%20Safety%20Videos.xlsx

 
Check out IFSQN’s extensive library of FREE food safety videos
https://www.ifsqn.com/food_safety_videos.html

 

recommend-us-on-facebook.png


#3 YongYM

YongYM

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 231 posts
  • 57 thanks
7
Neutral

  • Malaysia
    Malaysia
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Malaysia
  • Interests:Reading, Watching TV, Singing Karaoke & Sight-seeing

Posted 31 December 2011 - 02:45 AM

Wipe with moist clean towel/cloth? We are doing this.



#4 GMO

GMO

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 2,697 posts
  • 692 thanks
184
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom

Posted 02 January 2012 - 09:50 AM

Hmm. Personally I hate magnets but I understand their use. I don't use them and for dry powdered ingredients I would suggest a sieve would be better.

Still, some suggestions for your procedure could include dry cleaning. I assume you can access all of them even if they can't be removed? If so, perhaps brush off the contamination? What I would also include is that you should inspect the finds and ensure you're happy that the magnet is:

A. Picking up contamination and
B. That you've not got a major incident on your hands (the contamination may not all be picked up by the magnets so a big increase or lots of the same kind of contaminants should prompt an investigation.)



#5 QLD

QLD

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 59 posts
  • 10 thanks
2
Neutral

  • Australia
    Australia

Posted 03 January 2012 - 01:35 AM

A few comments

Placing a magnet on a clean surface and wiping clean with a clean cloth to remove any material works well with older magnets. I have heard of a brush being used but this could end up being a risk with loose fibres. If you use water remember to dry effectively if this may impact your product.

With new installations consider having a non magnetic section for cleaning eg with a pole magnet a small section at the end (not in the process stream) can be non magnetic, this would allow the use of a pushing tool to move the material to this spot at which point it would drop off. This method is a lot easier than the cloth method.

Avoid dropping the magnet or subjecting it to high temperature cleaning as this can reduce the strength of the magnet

Consider having a findings classification guide with different corrective actions eg milling processes often have low levels of fine metal powder as normal. This could require a different corrective action to high levels of fine powder or coarse findings.

Consider testing the magnet periodically using a gauss meter or by doing a pull test. I have not heard of defined critical limit but from experience tend to plan to replace at 6K gauss.

Consider modifying the magnet that cannot be removed so it can be. How can you effectively clean a magnet when you cannot fully access it?

It is worth considering using magnetic stainless steel prior to the magnet if deemed needed. An example could be on a wire screen. Keeping in mind magnetic stainless steel does not lend itself to all processes.

Whilst I don’t consider magnets good enough for a final inspection they serve their purpose as a good early indicator and they are cheap enough compared to other FM devices.

Hope this is of some help.

 



Thanked by 1 Member:

#6 miki

miki

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 1 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Bosnia and Herzegovinia
    Bosnia and Herzegovinia

Posted 13 May 2012 - 08:59 PM

Dear Bala,
In dry process, we use mechanical cleaning,
water will not be appropriate because it could have negative influence on dry products.
regards,

Dear Members,


I am looking for magnet clening procedure.
is there any special cleaning methode for magnet which is used in dry ingredients processing/packing line.
in some machine imagnet can be detached but in some processing machine it can't be detached.

please reply.


with regards / bala



#7 QAD_Rebisco

QAD_Rebisco

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 55 posts
  • 5 thanks
3
Neutral

  • Philippines
    Philippines

Posted 09 October 2013 - 03:19 AM

A few comments

Placing a magnet on a clean surface and wiping clean with a clean cloth to remove any material works well with older magnets. I have heard of a brush being used but this could end up being a risk with loose fibres. If you use water remember to dry effectively if this may impact your product.

With new installations consider having a non magnetic section for cleaning eg with a pole magnet a small section at the end (not in the process stream) can be non magnetic, this would allow the use of a pushing tool to move the material to this spot at which point it would drop off. This method is a lot easier than the cloth method.

Avoid dropping the magnet or subjecting it to high temperature cleaning as this can reduce the strength of the magnet

Consider having a findings classification guide with different corrective actions eg milling processes often have low levels of fine metal powder as normal. This could require a different corrective action to high levels of fine powder or coarse findings.

Consider testing the magnet periodically using a gauss meter or by doing a pull test. I have not heard of defined critical limit but from experience tend to plan to replace at 6K gauss.

Consider modifying the magnet that cannot be removed so it can be. How can you effectively clean a magnet when you cannot fully access it?

It is worth considering using magnetic stainless steel prior to the magnet if deemed needed. An example could be on a wire screen. Keeping in mind magnetic stainless steel does not lend itself to all processes.

Whilst I don’t consider magnets good enough for a final inspection they serve their purpose as a good early indicator and they are cheap enough compared to other FM devices.

Hope this is of some help.

hello QLD,

 

Since you have cleaning procedure for magnet? Do you have any record / form to fill-up by your personnel (operator) as a proof of evidence during cleaning activity?

 

Can u send me a draft / format of the form / record for me to adapt.

Hope you would respond and share u're ideas.

Thank you!

 

Regards ,

Christine :)


Edited by QAD_Rebisco, 09 October 2013 - 03:23 AM.


#8 QAD_Rebisco

QAD_Rebisco

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 55 posts
  • 5 thanks
3
Neutral

  • Philippines
    Philippines

Posted 14 October 2013 - 09:46 AM

Hello everyone, Does any one of your company has magnet as primary control measure to get the prevent any foreign materials that may adhered into the product?Is there a procedure for cleaning of magnets? Can you share it with us? How to weigh the metal cakes that stick into the magnet rod for us to get the weight metal cakes? Hope you could share your ideas. 

 

What are other best ways use before weighing to the weighing scale the collected fine crust metal powder? Because if we could directly put it into the weighing scale, the weighing scale with be damage and destroyed?

 

Thank you!

Hope you would respond.

 

christine






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users