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Juice contamination between glass bottle neck and cap


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#1 maricmargot

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 08:21 PM

Hi,

I need your help because I`ve never met with this situation.

I discovered a month after packaging as some juice samples are contaminated. Contamination appeared to more precisely between glass bottle neck and cap. All analyzes was ok, torq, nitrogen pressure but still I do not understand how it is possible.
Maybe you have some suggestions?

BR
maricmargot



#2 SUSHIL

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 01:31 AM

Hi,

I need your help because I`ve never met with this situation.

I discovered a month after packaging as some juice samples are contaminated. Contamination appeared to more precisely between glass bottle neck and cap. All analyzes was ok, torq, nitrogen pressure but still I do not understand how it is possible.
Maybe you have some suggestions?

BR
maricmargot


Hello,

Mr Maricmargot,

From this little information, we cannot give you any suggestions as you have not mentioned what type of juice you are packing in glass bottles, which type of caps you are using. What type of contamination-(microbiological) yeasts, molds , bacteria or any other type of contamination.

Whether you are pasteurising the juice or not, are glass bottles cleaned, are caps cleaned.

What do you mean by nitrogen pressure in bottles. How you are filling the juice in bottles –hot or cold filled.

Please give more information

Regards

Sushil



#3 maricmargot

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 07:28 AM

Hi Sushil,


the juice is pack in plastic bottles and caps are also from plastic.
The juice is non-carbonated and is pack cold. The contamination is with molds.
The bottles and caps are disinfection before use.


Tky
maricmargot

#4 SUSHIL

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 01:13 PM

Hello,

Mr Maricmargot,

It seems you are packing unpasteurised juices (probably made from single strength/concentrated refrigerated or aseptically processed pulp). Such juices are stored under refrigeration conditions and have a very short shelf life (< 1 month) under refrigeration conditions and are prone to microbial spoilage . A holding temperature as close to the juice freezing point as possible (-1 to -3ºC, depending on soluble solids), combined with efficient preparation and exceptional sanitation in preparation and packaging can extend storage life up to a month.

Thus the juice then has a shelf life limited by sanitary conditions and freezing conditions.

Thus minimal processing employing hurdles is called for. The hurdle principle is based on the premise that while any single barrier to microbial growth may be inadequate for desired protection, a number of barriers together can enhance product stability.

Thus good sanitation is the first barrier to reduce microbial load; low storage temperature further retards growth. An acid environment of pH less than 4.5 (ideally less than 3.5) restricts the growth of many organisms. Fortunately most juices are acid, or amenable to acidification. The exclusion of oxygen is an additional barrier. (IMPORTANT- anaerobic conditions are dangerous with low acid foods ,and can set the stage in low acid products for anaerobic pathogenic organisms, i.e.clostridium botulinium) .Hence always check the pH of filled juice is below 4.5 .To prevent spoilage from mold and yeasts ,Antimicrobial substances, sorbic acid, sulphites, benzoates can be added (depends upon regulatory requirements of your country) either natural or chemical preservatives, also assist. Proper use of hurdles can appreciably lengthen shelf life of unpasteurized juices without unduly affecting quality.

Also properly disinfecting your packing materials (plastic bottles &caps ) with approved disinfectants can help.


Regards

Sushil



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#5 George @ Safefood 360°

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 05:49 PM

Excellent post. Thank you. I agree. Based on the information provided, this is a short shelf life product and is simply perishing.

Hello,

Mr Maricmargot,

It seems you are packing unpasteurised juices (probably made from single strength/concentrated refrigerated or aseptically processed pulp). Such juices are stored under refrigeration conditions and have a very short shelf life (< 1 month) under refrigeration conditions and are prone to microbial spoilage . A holding temperature as close to the juice freezing point as possible (-1 to -3ºC, depending on soluble solids), combined with efficient preparation and exceptional sanitation in preparation and packaging can extend storage life up to a month.

Thus the juice then has a shelf life limited by sanitary conditions and freezing conditions.

Thus minimal processing employing hurdles is called for. The hurdle principle is based on the premise that while any single barrier to microbial growth may be inadequate for desired protection, a number of barriers together can enhance product stability.

Thus good sanitation is the first barrier to reduce microbial load; low storage temperature further retards growth. An acid environment of pH less than 4.5 (ideally less than 3.5) restricts the growth of many organisms. Fortunately most juices are acid, or amenable to acidification. The exclusion of oxygen is an additional barrier. (IMPORTANT- anaerobic conditions are dangerous with low acid foods ,and can set the stage in low acid products for anaerobic pathogenic organisms, i.e.clostridium botulinium) .Hence always check the pH of filled juice is below 4.5 .To prevent spoilage from mold and yeasts ,Antimicrobial substances, sorbic acid, sulphites, benzoates can be added (depends upon regulatory requirements of your country) either natural or chemical preservatives, also assist. Proper use of hurdles can appreciably lengthen shelf life of unpasteurized juices without unduly affecting quality.

Also properly disinfecting your packing materials (plastic bottles &caps ) with approved disinfectants can help.


Regards

Sushil




#6 Dai Williams

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 06:35 AM

If it is unpasteurised juice then 5 days will be the max shelf life.
Do you have foil seal on the cap if not a full micro free environment may well be difficult to achieve even with gas flushing.
Maintaining -1 to -5 in a commercial supply chain will be almost impossible. Have you validated the log kill on the bottle and cap sterilisation ?
R
dai



#7 Tony-C

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 07:18 PM

Hi,

I need your help because I`ve never met with this situation.

I discovered a month after packaging as some juice samples are contaminated. Contamination appeared to more precisely between glass bottle neck and cap. All analyzes was ok, torq, nitrogen pressure but still I do not understand how it is possible.
Maybe you have some suggestions?

BR
maricmargot


Hi MarciMargot,

This is usually caused by ineffective packaging disinfection or poor seals.

There seems to be some guess work going on by members so please explain your process and the incidence rate of contamination.

Regards,

Tony

#8 Shyguy77

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 07:19 PM

Could this be from spillages? Do you have appropriate headspaces and smooth transfers between filling and sealing of the bottles. If product is spilling out over the top of the bottles it can get trapped there during the seaming process. This could cause contamination where your seeing it, even though all your test are ok.






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