Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Need a solution for moisture analysis of cooked tuna loins?

moisture analysis moisture analysis of cooked

  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Jassi

Jassi

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 9 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Maldives
    Maldives

Posted 08 November 2013 - 05:31 PM

Dear all,

 

Please help me to find out the solution for moisture analysis of cooked tuna loins.

We are using Ohaus MB 45 halogen type moisture anlyser. Please let me know the suitable time, temperature and weight for analysis?



#2 chrisbird616

chrisbird616

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 24 posts
  • 2 thanks
3
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom

Posted 09 November 2013 - 09:49 PM

Sounds like an interesting question. I have nothing to offer in terms of an answer to your question, sorry, but I'm choosing to post so I can review any answers that you might receive.



Thanked by 1 Member:

#3 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 17,353 posts
  • 4833 thanks
943
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 10 November 2013 - 12:32 AM

Dear all,

 

Please help me to find out the solution for moisture analysis of cooked tuna loins.

We are using Ohaus MB 45 halogen type moisture anlyser. Please let me know the suitable time, temperature and weight for analysis?

 

My first action would be to read the equipment manual.

If no help (or no manual), my second action would be to contact the equipment supplier.

 

You may be lucky and find someone here who uses the same system and can advise. i hope so. :smile:

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Thanked by 1 Member:

#4 matthewcc

matthewcc

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 80 posts
  • 10 thanks
4
Neutral

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male

Posted 15 November 2013 - 11:09 PM

This is a different product than we test, and a different analyzer, but I think the concept is the same.  We put about 5 to 10 g on the sample pan and set it so it will stop when the rate of moisture loss drops to 0.05%/min or below and it stops automatically.  For our industry 105 degrees C is a standard analysis temperature, so we have adopted that.  Also we set it to read the percent moisture lost on a wet basis (compared to the initial weight).

 

As to how to put the analyzer on those settings, Charles is right that that should be in the operation manual.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Matthew



Thanked by 1 Member:

#5 Jassi

Jassi

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 9 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Maldives
    Maldives

Posted 16 November 2013 - 05:04 AM

Dear Matthew,

 

The information you provided is very helpful. Many thanks.

 

Can you please tell me which product you are testing?, Is it meat or not? Because moisture loss per minutes is very high for our product compared to 0.05%.

 

Kind Regards,

 

Jasim



#6 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 17,353 posts
  • 4833 thanks
943
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 16 November 2013 - 05:18 AM

Dear Jasim,

 

This appears to be the appropriate manual -

 

Attached File  MB45 Moisture Analyzer.pdf   1.52MB   9 downloads

 

I have previously encountered the situation where uncertainties of results in rapid testers occurred. As detailed in the manual, numerous caveats may exist.

 

The typical "calibration" method is to compare rapid data with that from  a "standard" procedure, eg fan-driven oven / 105degC or vacuum oven, using procedures such as AOAC.

From memory only, for canned tuna, vacuum was not necessary, ie no significant decomposition.

 

@Matthewcc - thanks for help / info.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Thanked by 1 Member:

#7 Jassi

Jassi

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 9 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Maldives
    Maldives

Posted 16 November 2013 - 05:49 AM

Dear Charles,

 

Thank you for your reply,

 

I am planning to run a calibration test with a standard oven method.

 

Regards / Jasim



#8 matthewcc

matthewcc

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 80 posts
  • 10 thanks
4
Neutral

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 November 2013 - 02:36 PM

Dear Matthew,

 

The information you provided is very helpful. Many thanks.

 

Can you please tell me which product you are testing?, Is it meat or not? Because moisture loss per minutes is very high for our product compared to 0.05%.

 

Kind Regards,

 

Jasim

 

We test plant material for moisture.  It is usually dried, but sometimes it is fresh.  Material being tested for moisture generally follows a decay curve and will eventually reach a moisture loss rate of 0.05% per minute.  Of course there are exceptions, but I don't think meat would be one.  It also helps to have material chopped finely and spread as flat as possible so that water can migrate out of the material more easily than if it is in one solid mass.

 

Matthew



Thanked by 1 Member:



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

EV SSL Certificate