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Volume test for whipped creams

whipped cream aerosol pressurized cans convert density volume whipped topping

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#1 JMiller

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 01:34 PM

I am trying to create some sort of dispensed volume test for Aerosol Whipped cream.   In determining this, I have to take into account the type of valve on the can (star) and air spots that will be present, thus creating an inconsistency.  The aerosol industry is very small and I'm finding I have very limited resources.  The same test that would be used for whipped cream, may be used for something such as shaving cream or aerosol cheese.

 

What I currently do:  I fill an 8 ounce cup with dispensed whipped cream, and measure an approximate 12-15 8 ounce servings per 15 ounce can of light whipped cream or whipped topping.  I want to find another approach that directly converts the 15 liquid ounces into whipped "fluffy" ounces.  For example, I may say, 6 ounces of my product may turn into 2 tablespoons.  In liquid form, it may be a mere 1/8 teaspoon.

 

The problem that arises here is the pressure of the can plays a huge role in the amount of whipped cream dispensed.  While it seems like the higher the pressure the more cream dispensed, this is not always the case.  If the pressure is too high, it actually releases too much cream initially and leaves nothing toward the end.  If the gas pressure is too low, it causes just the liquid to come out at the end.

 

My goal is to find a way to determine how to measure the exact amount dispensed.  I want to play with the amount of gas pressure in order to calculate the best psi for the product.  Because of the pockets that would be created, the only thing I can think of is creating some sort of device that I can dispense into from the bottom to try to prevent them altogether.  Time and temperature play a huge role in my project because the whipped cream begins to weep and lose consistency and texture after 4-5 minutes and runoff from syneresis occurs after about 6 minutes.  Any suggestions at all would be helpful. 

 

Thank you so much.



#2 George @ Safefood 360°

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Posted 23 November 2013 - 03:44 PM

I love your question and while I have a lot of experience in cream production I'm afraid it is not in the pressurised form. If I understand your question clearly you are simply seeking to determine the volume of 'fluffy' cream occupied by a known quantity of dispensed cream at atmospheric pressure?

 

George 



#3 JMiller

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 02:05 PM

I'm trying to determine the net 'dispensed' volume and even have a validation test for it.  This should also determine the percent yield. 

 
All I can think of is creating some sort of test that is similar to the spirometer that asthmatic patients use to measure their breathing.  I think of this because I know the test measures from the bottom and this would reduce the amount of air thus strictly measuring product.
 
 
The exact measurement we are ultimately trying to achieve is basically dispensed servings per container and how to measure this.

Thank you.


#4 Charles.C

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 03:56 PM

Dear jaimemillertime,

 

Like George, i found yr descriptive OP very interesting although totally outside my knowledge base. :smile:

 

I agree with yr opinion inasmuch as there must surely be a way to measure the net contents, even if proprietary. i would hv even expect there to be a legal necessity.?

 

i did a search on aerosol systems but the nearest i got was to a NIST manual of weight controls which did hv a section on standard methods for volume measurement but there was a noticeable disclaimer that methods not suitable for aerosol driven items. Unfortunately no possible solutions elsewhere for the latter were suggested.

 

Maybe something will come up yet.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#5 George @ Safefood 360°

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 08:45 PM

Hi Jaimemillertime

 

I have to admit in advance that I still don't fully understand the question. But it seems to me that simplicity might be the way to go. If you are seeking to verify the number of servings obtained from a can of pressurised cream then start with the known aspects. The consumer will determine what a typical or average expected serving is and this will be based on the volume of cream dispensed (regardless of the aeration etc). Why not simply have a container of a known and calibrated volume (laboratory beaker) which is equal to a serving. Place this on a laboratory scale and zero the scale. Then dispense the cream to obtain a brim fill (the known volume of a standard serving) and remove the excess with a spatula knife. The scales will indicate the net weight dispensed for the given standard serving. From this you will be able to calculate the number of servings that will be obtained from the sample can since you will measure the net weight of the sample can in advance. Variation from the standard specification you set will tell you if something has changed e.g. formulation, process, dispensing can/nozzle etc.) 

 

You may need to standardise the test in some areas. For example the temperature of the product when dispensed. I know from my experience with other pressurised packing processes that the temperature of the product affects the degree of aeration at the point of pressure change. You could perhaps standardise the temperature of the product in an incubator refrigerator since most consumers will store this type of product at chilled temperature before use.You will also need to set the test procedure based on an in control, standard process which produces the correct pressure. This will allow you to work backwards from the test result to the process pressure setting. In other words you will need to conduct an experiment to design the test fully.

 

In regard to the spirometer test I understand that this simply measures the peak flow of air exhaled by the patient. I'm not entirely sure how this would help you.

 

As I say, I'm not 100% sure of the question so the above suggestion might be completely off the mark.

 

George 


Edited by George Howlett, 03 December 2013 - 09:06 PM.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: whipped cream, aerosol, pressurized cans, convert, density, volume, whipped topping

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