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Publications on time/temperature to destroy salmonella in grain


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#1 dustishere

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 09:34 PM

Ive been looking all over for any publications on time/temperature to destroy salmonella in grain.  Can someone please lead me in the right direction or post a link of publications. Thanks.



#2 Avila

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 05:04 AM

Hi,

Maybe this literature is helpful

Attached Files



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#3 Charles.C

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 04:54 AM

Ive been looking all over for any publications on time/temperature to destroy salmonella in grain.  Can someone please lead me in the right direction or post a link of publications. Thanks.

 

Dear dustishere.

 

can you supply a little context ?

 

eg you you mean grain in bulk like in a silo ?

 

Or within a specific process step ?

 

Or ?

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#4 dustishere

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 02:14 PM

Dear dustishere.

 

can you supply a little context ?

 

eg you you mean grain in bulk like in a silo ?

 

Or within a specific process step ?

 

Or ?

 

Rgds / Charles.

 

What we have is a soup mixture we pour over groundup corn, then we run in through the dryer. Dryer inlet temp is 265 and exhaust temp is 133. We do know that roughly 1 1/2 ton of product flows through the dryer in an hour, so its a slow drying process.



#5 Charles.C

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 07:49 PM

What we have is a soup mixture we pour over groundup corn, then we run in through the dryer. Dryer inlet temp is 265 and exhaust temp is 133. We do know that roughly 1 1/2 ton of product flows through the dryer in an hour, so its a slow drying process.

degC or degF ?

average residence time in drier = ?

 

Either way I expect you are going to need some internal temperature/time distribution data, especially at the coolest point of the drier.

 

to illustrate the variations with product type/food matrix, here is a typical scenario for heat inactivation of salmonella in poultry -

 

Attached File  COMPLIANCE GUIDELINES FOR RTE MEAT AND POULTRY.doc   313KB   18 downloads

 

Can see that for core temperatures of 65 >70degC (+)  the time for 6-7D (= "elimination") drops from approx 1.5min to "instantaneous".

 

Now compare the data for corn / wheat flour (eg table 6.1) in this document (also summarised in post #2's attachment) -

 

Attached File  SalmonellaControlGuidance.pdf   541.8KB   43 downloads

 

Can see that the 6-7D times are much higher for the grain samples / salmonella species used and sensitive to aw, etc .

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#6 dustishere

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 10:18 PM

degC or degF ?

average residence time in drier = ?

 

Either way I expect you are going to need some internal temperature/time distribution data, especially at the coolest point of the drier.

 

to illustrate the variations with product type/food matrix, here is a typical scenario for heat inactivation of salmonella in poultry -

 

attachicon.gifCOMPLIANCE GUIDELINES FOR RTE MEAT AND POULTRY.doc

 

Can see that for core temperatures of 65 >70degC (+)  the time for 6-7D (= "elimination") drops from approx 1.5min to "instantaneous".

 

Now compare the data for corn / wheat flour (eg table 6.1) in this document (also summarised in post #2's attachment) -

 

attachicon.gifSalmonellaControlGuidance.pdf

 

Can see that the 6-7D times are much higher for the grain samples / salmonella species used and sensitive to aw, etc .

 

Rgds / Charles.C

Sorry, the temperatures are degF.  And product temperature at the end of the dryer is between 120-130 degF

 

We have never had a postive test come back for salmonella, but the auditor wants us to supply litature or a time/temperature table that our dryer temps are effective.






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