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#1 jtang

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 06:19 AM

Hi, I am new to BRC (worked with ISO 22000 and SQF).

 

I've always been exposed to the practice of obtainng product samples from beginning, middle, and end; or beginning, every 20th product, and end.

 

Is there a specific requirement with BRC in terms of sampling? Or any sampling guideline we can use as a reference?

My current company's protocol is to sample beginning, and then 2 hours later (even thoug it may be a 10 hour run). I feel that it is not a representative of the entire lot of products. However, if we take more samples, yes we can a better representation of the run, but we will get into issues such as more product wasted (for sampling), delayed testing (as we need to wait until end of the run), and delayed product release.

 

Any recommendations?

Any reference/guideline I can use to push forward a better sampling protocol?



#2 chrisbird616

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 02:38 PM

I'm sure other people can give more comprehensive answers to this than me (our products are fairly low risk), but essentially the overiding principle in BRC Food v6 is that product inspection should be done according to (food safety) risk.

 

In other words, the standard is fairly open-ended as to what you should do, as long as you can back it up and you review/feedback test records.

 

It's covered under sections (5.5 and 5.6).

 

Maybe if you are looking for specific reference(s) you should describe what kind of thing your company makes?



#3 Charles.C

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 12:12 AM

Is there a specific requirement with BRC in terms of sampling? Or any sampling guideline we can use as a reference?

 

As previous post I think the simple answer is No for the 3 standards you mention. it may depend on product/process/target/tolerance/history etc. BAM give a salmonella sampling procedure for batches. i anticipate Health Canada do also.

 

If you are currently using the OP procedure I have some sympathy for yr laboratory staff. Must be perpetual overtime if you are doing things like salmonella. :smile:

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#4 Tony-C

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 07:11 AM

Hi, I am new to BRC (worked with ISO 22000 and SQF).

 

I've always been exposed to the practice of obtainng product samples from beginning, middle, and end; or beginning, every 20th product, and end.

 

Is there a specific requirement with BRC in terms of sampling? Or any sampling guideline we can use as a reference?

My current company's protocol is to sample beginning, and then 2 hours later (even thoug it may be a 10 hour run). I feel that it is not a representative of the entire lot of products. However, if we take more samples, yes we can a better representation of the run, but we will get into issues such as more product wasted (for sampling), delayed testing (as we need to wait until end of the run), and delayed product release.

 

Any recommendations?

Any reference/guideline I can use to push forward a better sampling protocol?

 

Hi Jtang,

 

BRC Guidance 5.5.1.1 Product test schedules: The frequency and type of product tests should be based on risk and on any particular customer requirements. The HACCP study will identify some of the tests required and their frequency ....consideration must be given to other tests which ensure the quality of the product.

 

Risks are usually start/end and changes such as the product supply tank and that is where sampling is normally focused. If you are familiar with SQF then you will be familiar with Food Safety Plans and Food Quality Plans. I usually sample during runs of the same product based on history with a minimum sample requirement such as 1 sample per hour.

 

Regards,

 

Tony



#5 trubertq

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 01:34 PM

Technically microbiological sampling should only be a verification that your process is in control.

 

The Hazard analysis and risk assessment carried out for your HACCP plan should identify the process steps where loss of control could result in a serious Food safety risk.

 

Therefore if you can prove via your CCPs, pre requisite programme and operational pre requisites that you have your process under control the necessity for huge amounts of sampling should be negated.

 

Holding retained samples may be a better option, as then you have samples available if there is an issue.

 

There are EU requirements for sampling for  foods in EU 2073/2005 I'm sure there is comparable Canadian legislation.

 

Sampling can also be customer driven as they use it as a verification of your procedures, so risk assess and draw up a reasonable plan ( taking costs into consideration) and review periodically as you may find that you need to reduce or increase dependant on the data you have obtained from the sampling.


I'm entitled to my opinion, even a stopped clock is right twice a day




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