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Safe Levels of Sodium Metabisulfite


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#26 GMO

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 08:44 AM

Ooh zombie thread!

 

I've also been told it's pointless / virtually impossible to swab for sulphites.  I have an interesting story to tell about that though.  We had sulphited dried apricots which came back negative for sulphites.  If you know anything about dried apricots you'll know that in all probability they probably have too much sulphites in them rather than too little.  It turns out the lab method for testing sulphites is really, really prone to "losing" the sulphites if you mash up the sample too much.  So, they tend to err on the side of caution on this, perhaps too much so.  Meaning my sample of bright yellow apricots came back as sulphite free which is impossible. 

 

That cautionary tale aside, what we do is we test a product containing sulphites as a positive control then we do a normal clean then test the first three products made on the same equipment for sulphites to validate the efficacy of the clean.  We then verify by visual inspection.  Fact is it's quite hard to cross contaminate with sulphites.  If you had egg, nuts, mustard etc, I'd use the rapid test kits as well but for sulphites even if the rapid kits exist, I wouldn't bother.  If you do want to and can find a kit for rapid swabbing of sulphites, the first thing I'd do is a positive control, i.e. check it works on a "dirty" piece of kit which has been processing sulphites in high concentrations.  If it doesn't, then you kit is pointless anyway, either because the sulphites are "lost" during the processing or because the kit don't work!

 



#27 James Dough

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 10:57 PM

Hi Charles,

The only sulphites we have are in our ingredients for some of our dough products. The spec for the ingredient is <100ppm, so mathematically based on batch weight at a 99ppm level it could be higher than 10 ppm, which is above the CFIA limit for non declaring. I want to swab the equipment post product clean and validate that the level of sulphite is below 10 ppm or negative altogether. Neogen said they only have a test kit for crustations, but i think I may be able to use the indigo kit, as you can wet the strip with distilled water and wipe it on the area and if sulphites are present, should show the color change.

 

Now my next question that crosses the border into a labeling discussion, if all of my labels read may contain trace amounts of sulphites, is this test a non issue?

 

Thanks,

 

James



#28 Charles.C

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 07:06 AM

Hi Charles,

The only sulphites we have are in our ingredients for some of our dough products. The spec for the ingredient is <100ppm, so mathematically based on batch weight at a 99ppm level it could be higher than 10 ppm, which is above the CFIA limit for non declaring. I want to swab the equipment post product clean and validate that the level of sulphite is below 10 ppm or negative altogether. Neogen said they only have a test kit for crustations, but i think I may be able to use the indigo kit, as you can wet the strip with distilled water and wipe it on the area and if sulphites are present, should show the color change.

 

Now my next question that crosses the border into a labeling discussion, if all of my labels read may contain trace amounts of sulphites, is this test a non issue?

 

Thanks,

 

James

 

Hi James,

 

Seems to me you basically need to test yr finished product.

 

JFI it is not impossible to measure sulphite levels in foods in the 1-10ppm range but  lab.facilities are required.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#29 kkm254

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 05:53 PM

Hi Leighbre, do you process the potatoes into pre cut French fries or pre-peeled whole potatoes for the hospitality industry?



#30 Charles.C

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 09:07 PM

Hi Leighbre, do you process the potatoes into pre cut French fries or pre-peeled whole potatoes for the hospitality industry?

 

You are addressing a 3-year old post.

There may be some delay in response.

Good luck.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#31 inamfst

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Posted 31 May 2018 - 07:15 PM

Good Day members,

1. Can anyone help me out to calculate the PPM level of sodium metabisulphite (SMBS)?

it will be calculated 1mg SMBS / L water or needs to calculate basis purity of SMBS (we are receiving 97% food grade SMBS) or something else?

Like "leighbre" we are also processing the potatos and fruits and using SMBS as anti-browning agent.

 

2. Does anyone else using another type of anti-browning agent?

I was using ascorbic acid on potato chips before they goes in frying process back In UAE and it was quite successful. any suggestion to replace SMBS please share the experience.

 

Kind regards

Inamuddin



#32 inamfst

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Posted 31 May 2018 - 07:17 PM

we process potatoes for hospitality industry in New Zealand. we dip the potatoes in a sodium met solution @ 7g per litre of water and pass through a dip tank which takes 1 minute and 40 secs to get through. our lab tests show an SO2 level of <10ppm. the allowable residue of SO2 in New Zealand is a max of 200 ppm. hope this helps

Hi, thanks for sharing valuable information; can you share the link where I can find out the 200ppm level mentioned.

I tried to find out at MPI and FSANZ but its saying as per GMP; not a numerical figure.

Kind regards



#33 Charles.C

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Posted 01 June 2018 - 12:51 AM

Good Day members,

1. Can anyone help me out to calculate the PPM level of sodium metabisulphite (SMBS)?

it will be calculated 1mg SMBS / L water or needs to calculate basis purity of SMBS (we are receiving 97% food grade SMBS) or something else?

Like "leighbre" we are also processing the potatos and fruits and using SMBS as anti-browning agent.

 

2. Does anyone else using another type of anti-browning agent?

I was using ascorbic acid on potato chips before they goes in frying process back In UAE and it was quite successful. any suggestion to replace SMBS please share the experience.

 

Kind regards

Inamuddin

 

Hi Inamuddin,

 

So as to answer yr question, how much weight of SMBS are you adding to how much volume of water ?

 

For example, 1 mg SMBS dissolved in 1 Litre water would (nominally) = 1 PPM SMBS

 

The active ingredient is "SO2" of course.

 

The 200 PPM was noted 3 years ago. Maybe things have changed.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#34 inamfst

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Posted 01 June 2018 - 08:37 PM

Hi Inamuddin,

 

So as to answer yr question, how much weight of SMBS are you adding to how much volume of water ?

 

For example, 1 mg SMBS dissolved in 1 Litre water would (nominally) = 1 PPM SMBS

 

The active ingredient is "SO2" of course.

 

The 200 PPM was noted 3 years ago. Maybe things have changed.

 

Hi Charles,

Thanks for your input and calculations:

Some research I have done yesterday and below is the finding:

To prepare the solution of SMBS calculations shall be based on SO2 which is almost 67% of total SMBS:

 

The molecular weights of Na2S2O5 and SO2 (sodium and sulphur dioxide) are calculated to be 190, and 64 respectively.

One molecule of Na2S2O5 releases 2 molecules of SO2 (sulphur dioxide) (see equations)

And 190gm of Na2S2O5 (sodium metabisulphite) will release 128 gm (2 * 64 gm) of SO2 when added to juice or wine.

That is Na2S2O5 yields 67.4% w/w SO2 (128/190 * 100)

So in calculations we need to use ratio of So2 instead of Sodium metabisulphite as whole, hence SO2 is always 67.4% of Sodium metabisulphite.

To prepare 100 litres of a 200ppm solution from a of sodium metabisulphite how much amount of sodium metabisulphite is required?

So SO2 is 67.4% of Sodium metabisulphite, hence each mg of sodium metabisulphite contains 0.674mg of SO2 hence in 1 litre of water 0.674mg of SO2.

0.674 / 100 * 1000,000 = 67400 ppm in a litre ; 100L = 100000ml

So C1V1 = C2V2                 =>  674000 V1 = 200x100,000 => 200x100/674000 = 29.67gm

 

hope this will help, some members in future

 

Kind regards



#35 Charles.C

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Posted 02 June 2018 - 04:16 PM

Hi inamuddin,

 

I agree your basic maths but the chemistry/equilibria involved in wine makes the practical calculation much more complicated of course, eg -

 

Attached File  Sulfur Dioxide in wine.pdf   1.15MB   3 downloads

 

Potatoes would be different again presumably. :smile:


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#36 inamfst

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Posted 12 December 2018 - 02:17 AM

Hi All,

 

Folks, I heed your help, please.

We are fruit and vegetable processing place and we are about to launch a new product which is peeled potatoes. It will come in both 5-gallon and 20-gallon containers filled with Sodium Metabisulfite solution to preserve the potatoes. I have instructions on mixing the right concentration. I don't feel comfortable going just by mixing formula. I need test strips or test kit to measure the concentration level. I don't even know what are safe levels for Sudium Metabisulfite for peeled potatoes. Please, if someone has expertise in that field, advise me on what I should do.

 

Many thanks,

 

Ostap

Hi Ostap and Oromaniv and all in the communication eager to explore the Sodium Metabisulfite limit.

I think its too late to answer, however its never too late. It might useful to future searchers the concentration of Sodium Metabisulfite for washing the vegetables. As per Austria New Zealand Food Code Schedule 18; 25ppm is the max limit.

Since it states washing agent, its presumed that the concentration of washing water shall be 25ppm.

Have a look on attached Food Code Schedule 18.

Kind regards

Inam - Auckland NZ

Attached Files



#37 sharti

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 02:32 AM

Hi All

 

I have a similar issue with using Sodium Metabisulfite (SMB) on potatoes and  tuber vegetables. SMB can both be used as a processing aid and as an additive with different levels indicated on FSANZ website.

We use it as an additive and as indicated 200mg/kg is maximum permitted level of SO2 and sulphites in the finished product.

 

To be able to get 200mg/kg maximum in the produce, what ratio of SMB is needed per L of water to make a solution? This concentration will be used as a Critical Control Point and test strips used to determine the levels.

 

 

Many Thanks



#38 Charles.C

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 04:19 AM

Hi All

 

I have a similar issue with using Sodium Metabisulfite (SMB) on potatoes and  tuber vegetables. SMB can both be used as a processing aid and as an additive with different levels indicated on FSANZ website.

We use it as an additive and as indicated 200mg/kg is maximum permitted level of SO2 and sulphites in the finished product.

 

To be able to get 200mg/kg maximum in the produce, what ratio of SMB is needed per L of water to make a solution? This concentration will be used as a Critical Control Point and test strips used to determine the levels.

 

 

Many Thanks

 

Hi sharti,

 

I suggest you study the previous posts 13-20


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#39 inamfst

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 07:23 PM

Hi All

 

I have a similar issue with using Sodium Metabisulfite (SMB) on potatoes and  tuber vegetables. SMB can both be used as a processing aid and as an additive with different levels indicated on FSANZ website.

We use it as an additive and as indicated 200mg/kg is maximum permitted level of SO2 and sulphites in the finished product.

 

To be able to get 200mg/kg maximum in the produce, what ratio of SMB is needed per L of water to make a solution? This concentration will be used as a Critical Control Point and test strips used to determine the levels.

 

 

Many Thanks

 

 


 

Hi Sharti,

Assuming your product is intended for further processing and not ready to eat; whats do you mean by preservation - are you wanting to avoid enzymatic browning or microbiological preservation?

Number of experiments shown that the solution of 200ppm as washing agent resulted in less than 50ppm SO2 level in the final product (as solution only act at surface, and when testing is performed it required composite sample of whole product).

 

Meaning, if you able to achieve your preservation effect with 200ppm solution and you are much less than the maximum limit is given by FSANZ.

Coming back to your question, if you really wanting to add 200ppm SO2 in final product, than you have to run number of samples and get it tested from independent labs e.g. AssureQuality and Eurofins can do such testing.

 

Kind regards

Inam


Edited by Charles.C, 01 October 2019 - 10:52 PM.
reformatted





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