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astro

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 12:20 PM

Hi 

 

I am not a micro expert but can somebody tell me how many 0' are in 

 

5x106

5x102

 

Is there a chart to help me with this?

 

Cheers



moskito

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 03:15 PM

Hi astro

 

102 = 10 x 10 = 100

103= 10 x 10 x 10 = 1000

 

5 x 102 = 5 x 10 x 10 = 500

 

Rgds

moskito



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Posted 29 July 2014 - 03:51 PM

if you have excel you can perform exponents by using the ^ symbol.  For example go into a cell and put =5*10^6 and hit enter


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Posted 30 July 2014 - 04:35 AM

Hi 

 

I am not a micro expert but can somebody tell me how many 0' are in 

 

5x106

5x102

 

Is there a chart to help me with this?

 

Cheers

 

Dear astro,

 

I assume this is a "micro" question.

 

Yr query refers to "multiplying whole numbers by powers of ten".

 

I assume you only have whole numbers, eg 1,2,3,4 and not numbers in decimal format, eg 1.1, 2.2, etc.

 

In yr OP example 5x106,  the number after the "10" is called "the exponent", ie exponent = 6

 

The solution to yr OP is according to this rule -

 

Add as many zeroes to the right of the whole number as the exponent.

 

so, for 5x106, add 6 zeroes > 5,000,000

 

similarly for 5x102, exponent is 2,  > 500

 

Note again, this method fails if the number has a decimal format, eg 5.1x106 will not work as per this rule (see link below).

 

The reason why the rule works is explained here -

http://www.themathpa...rs-of-10.htm#q1

(see No.1 for whole numbers, No.2 for decimals)

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Tony-C

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 05:54 AM

Hi 

 

I am not a micro expert but can somebody tell me how many 0' are in 

 

5x106

5x102

 

Is there a chart to help me with this?

 

Cheers

 

This is Maths not micro (as per Charles' link 'Add on as many 0's as appear in the power') so where N is a number between 1 and 9:

Nx100 = No Zeros = N

Nx101 = 1 zero = N0

Nx102 = 2 Zeros = N00

Nx103 = 3 Zeros = N,000

Nx104 = 4 Zeros = N0,000

Nx105 = 5 Zeros = N00,000

Nx106 = 6 Zeros = N,000,000

Nx107 = 7 Zeros = N0,000,000

 

Regards,

 

Tony



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cazyncymru

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 07:11 AM

This is Maths not micro (as per Charles' link 'Add on as many 0's as appear in the power') so where N is a number between 1 and 9:

Nx100 = No Zeros = N

Nx101 = 1 zero = N0

Nx102 = 2 Zeros = N00

Nx103 = 3 Zeros = N,000

Nx104 = 4 Zeros = N0,000

Nx105 = 5 Zeros = N00,000

Nx106 = 6 Zeros = N,000,000

Nx107 = 7 Zeros = N0,000,000

 

Regards,

 

Tony

 

Simples! :giggle:



astro

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 09:07 AM

Thanks guys for your expertise feed back that is most useful.

 

One more for you if you may

 

<300 / g (2)

 

m 500 / g - M 5000 / g ; n=5 et c = 2 (2)

 

abs / 25g (1) which normally i understand abs in 25g or present in over 25g

 

:silly:



Charles.C

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 09:43 AM

Dear Astro,

 

Maybe you should tell us how much maths you understand ?

 

eg

 

(i) < = ?

 

(ii) 10x = ?

 

(iii) "(2)" as in 2(2) = ?

 

(iv) "(1)" as in 25g(1) = ?

 

the definition of m,M,n,c is easy, straight from a textbook.

 

But the understanding of the definitions is likely outside your scope if you do not know the answers to (i-iv) above.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


astro

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 09:59 AM

I know enough to get by THANKYOU

 

This still did not answer the question 

 

 

All I'm after is what the number in the bracket represents??


Edited by Simon, 01 August 2014 - 05:47 PM.
Removed the multiple bird fingers and will delete that emoticon when I get a minute


Charles.C

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 10:25 AM

Dear astro,

 

Thanks for answering my query.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


cazyncymru

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 10:41 AM

Hi astro

 

to answer your query

 

class sampling plans   consist of

n – number of sample units to be chosen independently and randomly from the lot

m – a microbiological limit that separates good quality from marginally acceptable quality

 

 M – a microbiological limit above which sampling results are unacceptable or defective

c – maximum allowable number of sample units yielding results between m and M (marginally acceptable);

the number of sample units allowed to exceed M is usually set to 0 

 

Caz x

 

 

 



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Tony-C

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 04:02 PM

Simples! :giggle:

 

It is to some people but like a foreign language to others  :secret:

 

I'm always thankful that I have always excelled at Maths as it helps so much in real life and you are less likely to be ripped off.



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