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Is exit testing required for HACCP training?


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K Hallman

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 07:17 PM

We are an injection molding company who produces a plastic part used in food packaging and are rolling out our HACCP plan.  We are doing our first round of HACCP training and the question of whether or not we needed to have an exit test after the employee training has come to the surface.  I am leaning towards "yes" as test results would provide verification that the training was effective.  I should also add that the development of the HACCP plan is customer driven at this point so I don't have applicable standard to reference. 

Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.



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Posted 11 November 2014 - 07:23 PM

It's always a good idea to have an end test and also a feedback form on the training course content, presenter and facilities etc.


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Posted 11 November 2014 - 07:26 PM

:welcome:  :welcome:

 

 

I would agree with Simon.  If you are providing the training, get feedback and make sure they understand the material otherwise, you've done all the work without proving the gain. 


Edited by Snookie, 11 November 2014 - 10:15 PM.

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Mr. Incognito

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 07:29 PM

Anything that deals with food safety should have at least a 5 - 10 question quiz at the end that hits major points of the training.  For something that is as important as HACCP for the food safety team I'd push more toward 10 - 20 good questions.

 

This provides verification that your training was effective.


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Posted 11 November 2014 - 08:14 PM

I would agree that some form of assessment/record of achievement is required- which could be written or MCQ

 

-but there are alternatives which allow a more in-depth assessment & sometimes bring out the best in staff where a traditional test approach maybe would not!

 

eg- we have had good results with 

 

a group 'case study' or problem solving approach

 

observation/questioning 'on the job'

 

individual/group presentations 

 

(ideally based on 'real life' workplace issues/situations)

 

 

Alternative assessment methods are definitely not the easiest option-presenting challenges with planning/ organisation/recording-but if you can get round these... I think the assessment is much more robust & embeds the learning much more effectively than the training/test alone !

 

 

 

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 09:10 PM

I find tests/quizzes often test how well the operator can read and write in English as opposed to how well the operator understands HACCP

 

Testing is by far the easiest way to measure understanding, but practical demonstration, group/team discussions, etc are all good. 

 

What I would recommend is a record with training material, date, name of trainer, and key points from the session.  Have them sign that they completed and understood training at a bare minimum, have them demonstrate knowledge of key points to have a solid program.  Most people demonstrate knowledge with a quiz, I use a checklist I complete and have them go onto the floor and perform the task.  It kind of depends on what time you have, quizzes are quicker. 


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Posted 11 November 2014 - 10:17 PM

I find tests/quizzes often test how well the operator can read and write in English as opposed to how well the operator understands HACCP

 

Testing is by far the easiest way to measure understanding, but practical demonstration, group/team discussions, etc are all good. 

 

What I would recommend is a record with training material, date, name of trainer, and key points from the session.  Have them sign that they completed and understood training at a bare minimum, have them demonstrate knowledge of key points to have a solid program.  Most people demonstrate knowledge with a quiz, I use a checklist I complete and have them go onto the floor and perform the task.  It kind of depends on what time you have, quizzes are quicker. 

 

I agree I often do oral quizzes along with the training records. 


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Posted 11 November 2014 - 11:53 PM

For SQF

2.9.4 HACCP Training Requirement
What the SQF Code says
2.9.4.1 HACCP training shall be provided for staff involved in developing and maintaining food safety plans and food quality plans
2.9.4 Implementation Guidance
What does it mean?
Two-day (or equivalent), examinable HACCP training is required for the SQF practitioner (refer 2.1.2.5).



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Posted 12 November 2014 - 11:27 AM

The problem with an oral quiz is there is no written record of their understanding.  Also a group exercise only shows that at least someone understands the material not that everyone does.  Only a written quiz shows that everyone who was at the training understood the material.


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Posted 12 November 2014 - 11:50 AM

The problem with an oral quiz is there is no written record of their understanding.  Also a group exercise only shows that at least someone understands the material not that everyone does.  

If it is done properly....

 

-there should always be written record of their performance against the set criteria (learning outcomes)- signed off by the  facilitator/supervisor & the learner  :smile:

 

(In the group exercise scenario each participant is given a particular role/ responsibilities/task and assessed against them individually-so one person knowing wouldn't help!)

 

It's not easy to organise-(which is why most trainers just hand out the test papers and pencils (lol) but it's nice because it can be their real roles on the production floor-and or real problems!

 

 

 

 

Only a written quiz shows that everyone who was at the training understood the material.

 sadly, in many cases,  because of the complexity of the language used in the test, this only shows that the people that can read & write well understand the material!

 

Having written tests only can present a huge barrier to individuals who can't, but otherwise have an excellent grasp of the course & do an excellent job

 

Mike


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Posted 12 November 2014 - 12:29 PM

Just done some health & safety training; at the end we had a multiple choice written end test and also a feedback form.

If you do it record it or you didn't do it...in an auditors (law courts) eyes.


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Posted 12 November 2014 - 01:07 PM

Just done some health & safety training; at the end we had a multiple choice written end test and also a feedback form.

If you do it record it or you didn't do it...in an auditors (law courts) eyes.

 

Exactly.

 

Quizzes don't have to have trick questions (though most of mine have a little bit of a trick question on them to make sure they are paying attention) and can be plainly worded.

 

What does HACCP stand for:

       A: Blah

       B: Blah

       C: Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point

       D: Have a cup of coffee and pray (my favorite answer)

 

Most of my questions usually have at least one very wrong answer and the other two are not so far off.

 

I put a true and false question or two in...

 

It doesn't have to be hard.


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Posted 12 November 2014 - 02:14 PM

And sometimes, I go through the quiz answers before they turn the answer sheet in.

 

"You should have Hazard Anaylsis Critical Control Point for Number 1". 


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Posted 12 November 2014 - 03:38 PM

Here's an example of the form I use to record practical demonstrations.  I also use training games (slap game, jeopardy!, skits/role playing), and I count performing those activities as testing, because they prove to me they know, employes like them more, and I think they understand more.

 

The employees signs off that they received the training, and I initial on the left next to each task after they complete it.


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Posted 12 November 2014 - 03:42 PM

Thanks for the feedback everyone.  It's been a big help.



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Posted 12 November 2014 - 04:26 PM

Keyser Soze!  :sleazy:


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Posted 12 November 2014 - 05:57 PM

For one of my orientation safety presentations, which are normally in a small group or one-on-one, I engage the person in a conversation about the material rather than have a formal lecture.  This presentation contains good work habits, ladder safety, PPE, fire prevention, and emergency preparedness.

 

To verify the training, I have a checklist of the topics that were presented, a box to check that they learned the information, and place where I state what I base my assessment on.  Usually I say that I it is based on personal interaction.  But at the end, I know that they understand the content and it is documented.

 

This is not as easy with a larger group, but if you engage everyone in the larger group, and make sure that you are monitoring their responses, you can use a non-written assessment format.

 

Another problem is that we have a multi-language work force.  Some of the people are not fully literate in their original language.  So giving evidence that they learned something is not always best done with a written test, since some have problems reading the test, even when it is in their home language.  So some creativity is needed at times. 

 

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 08:00 PM

Keyser Soze!  :sleazy:

 

I understand who Keyser Soze is but am not getting the reference......... :doh:


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Posted 12 November 2014 - 08:19 PM

I understand who Keyser Soze is

You better let U.S. Customs Agent Dave Kujan know



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Posted 13 November 2014 - 01:11 PM

A test is required for the formal HACCP training per the code.  However, if you are providing training for all employees (perhaps those not on the HACCP team) a test is not required. What is necessary is verification and validation of the training system.  A test is not always the best way.  Many people can remember what was taught immediately after it was taught.  Follow up observations by supervisors can be better.  Several days after training - have supervisors ask employees what they learned. Or, consider adding a training and competency component to employee annual reviews.   The code requires that 'supervisors' verify training - not necessarily the trainer. 


Cathy Crawford, HACCP Consulting Group
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Posted 13 November 2014 - 03:49 PM

There are lots of examples online of GMP quizzes. While they may not always be effective at engaging employees, they are a reference for future non conformance issues with employees. If you don't have a way to "test" your employees knowledge and/or engagement levels, it becomes difficult to pull an employee aside and explain why they require retraining.  We have all sat our way through enough boring old videos to know that employees disengage as soon as the cheesy music starts. If employees know that there is a minimum grade to work, then it forces them to pay attention. I do have a minimum acceptable score of 18/20. If I have done my job well, everyone should pass.

 

We are getting our final inspection next week, and I am hoping to start general training next week. None of my employees have ANY food industry experience, so i'm hoping that because they know there is a test, they will stay engages.  So I hear you completely on the first round of training.

 

My HACCP plan does require the employee training "to be effective as written" The only way to be sure of that is to "test" your employees. I also have employee checks as part of both my pre-op and operational record. i/e monitor employees at hand washing station, visually inspect employees have the correct clothing on for work, 


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