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Mike Green

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 09:51 AM

 

One in 10 UK sausages ‘carries risk of Hepatitis E virus’

 
One in 10 sausages and processed pork meat products in England and Wales could cause hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection if undercooked, experts warn.
 
There has been an “abrupt rise” in the number of cases in England and Wales as people do not realise the risk, scientists advising the government say.
 
Sausages should be cooked for 20 minutes at 70C to kill the virus, they said.
 
Although serious cases are rare, HEV can cause liver damage or be fatal.
 
Official government figures show there were 124 confirmed cases of HEV in 2003, which rose to 691 cases in 2013. There were 461 cases in the first six months of this year.
 
Symptoms include jaundice and sometimes tiredness, fever, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.
 
Most people will get over the virus, although for some, such as those with an immune deficiency disorder, or pregnant women, it can prove fatal.

 

(From Barfblog)

 

70 degrees internal temperature for 20 mins  to inactivate the virus (aka cremation!!!)-doubt it happens-cos if it did the resulting product would IMO be pretty much inedible!-so hardly surprising that the cases are increasing exponentially!!!!!!

 

I think they possibly need to rethink their advice..... and maybe go 95 degrees for 5 minutes- to at least give us a chance of being able to eat it at the end of the cooking process????

 

Mike

 

 


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Posted 12 November 2014 - 07:50 PM

I would think that would depend on method of cooking whether you get cremation or not, but suspect the actual kill time is less than 20 minutes, but they are going for the worst case and hopefully get people to cook it at least 5-10 minutes. 


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Mike Green

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 10:50 AM

I would think that would depend on method of cooking whether you get cremation or not, but suspect the actual kill time is less than 20 minutes, but they are going for the worst case and hopefully get people to cook it at least 5-10 minutes. 

 

Very True!-(I was thinking about BBQ!!!!!!!!!!!!!!) :biggrin:

 

All of the research I've seen does actually specify 70 degrees for 20 minutes for total inactivation though  for example  -so I reckon there would be more chance of getting people to do a higher temp-for a shorter time?

 

Mike


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Simon

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 11:24 AM

Do we know which sausages Mike; I'm partial to a banger and usually buy Aldi finest range.


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Mike Green

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 11:54 AM

Do we know which sausages Mike; I'm partial to a banger and usually buy Aldi finest range.

 Hi Simon

 

All sausages containing pig parts (in many cases you can't really call it pork! :rofl2: ) could potentially harbour HEV....regardless of brand  -unfortunately!

 

it has been  known for years that pigs in the UK carry HEV- but there has been an exponential increase in the number of human cases in the first part of this year (>400) compared to <200 per year normally-hence the call to action!

 

Mike


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Posted 13 November 2014 - 05:27 PM

Very True!-(I was thinking about BBQ!!!!!!!!!!!!!!) :biggrin:

 

All of the research I've seen does actually specify 70 degrees for 20 minutes for total inactivation though  for example  -so I reckon there would be more chance of getting people to do a higher temp-for a shorter time?

 

Mike

 

Usually we boil them first so they are well cooked and then throw them on the grill to that crispy skin and BBQ flavor.  Hmmmm.....is it lunch time yet?   Now I'm hungry. 


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Mike Green

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Posted 15 November 2014 - 12:48 PM

 Hmmmm.....is it lunch time yet?   Now I'm hungry. 

 

Ha ha!

 

I think steaming/boiling first is definitely the anwer to the quality/safety issue- thnx for that!

 

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Posted 15 November 2014 - 03:15 PM

I've never thought to pre-boil them, I bet they're really good that way and defintely cooked.


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Posted 15 November 2014 - 08:41 PM

Dear Mike,

 

Very topical (and strawberries also apparently) - 

http://www.bbc.com/n...health-30006977

 

The UK aspect seems to go back at least 2 years (Defra survey) and has maybe somewhat flown under the radar although quite widely broadcast in 2013, eg -

 

http://www.ibtimes.c...s-agency-506152.

 

The 20 mins and 10% have seemingly  been picked as largest  of some ball-park estimates, eg - 

 

http://www.fsai.ie/f...epatitis_e.html

(stated to be last reviewed july 2014, especially see secs.7, 8)

 

Also suggested to be an imported disease rather than home-grown.

 

And the UK is by no means alone, Beaujolais-land also, eg -

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/23347828

 

Rgds / Charles


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Posted 17 November 2014 - 05:00 PM

I've never thought to pre-boil them, I bet they're really good that way and defintely cooked.

 

That's why we do it this way.  I know they are properly cooked and they don't come out like petrified meat from being on the BBQ to long.  Sometimes hubby will throw a few wood chips on to lower the temp and give them a bit of flavorful smoke.   Dang its no where lunch time.  :helpplease:


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Posted 18 November 2014 - 01:57 PM

That's why we do it this way.  I know they are properly cooked and they don't come out like petrified meat from being on the BBQ to long.  Sometimes hubby will throw a few wood chips on to lower the temp and give them a bit of flavorful smoke.   Dang its no where lunch time.  :helpplease:

Dear Snookie,

 

Don't forget the guacamollie :glare:

 

Rgds / Charles.C


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Posted 18 November 2014 - 04:30 PM

Dear Snookie,

 

Don't forget the guacamollie :glare:

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

Do I sense distain for guacamole?   Oh my gosh it is such a wonderful food.....not for sausages though.  Mustard, beer, sauerkraut, beer, onions, beer, mashed potatoes, beer....these are foods for sausages.....oooooh  cabbage and onions with carrots.....ah.....now we are talking good food.  

 

Guacamole should be used on tacos, chips, burritos, chips, salads, chips sandwiches, chips, so many other wonderful places to eat this delicious item....with lots of beer or margueritas.   


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Mike Green

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 10:01 AM

Dear Mike,

 

Very topical (and strawberries also apparently) - 

http://www.bbc.com/n...health-30006977

 

The UK aspect seems to go back at least 2 years (Defra survey) and has maybe somewhat flown under the radar although quite widely broadcast in 2013, eg -

 

http://www.ibtimes.c...s-agency-506152.

 

The 20 mins and 10% have seemingly  been picked as largest  of some ball-park estimates, eg - 

 

http://www.fsai.ie/f...epatitis_e.html

(stated to be last reviewed july 2014, especially see secs.7, 8)

 

Also suggested to be an imported disease rather than home-grown.

 

And the UK is by no means alone, Beaujolais-land also, eg -

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/23347828

 

Rgds / Charles

Hi Charles

 

Thanks for that-interesting stuff!  first e-coli 0157 in raspberries from contaminated water and now HEV in strawberries!

 

 

I think you are correct that  the 10% is pretty much 'finger in the air stuff'  :smile:  -(the sample size of the study was pretty small)

 

but the '70 degrees for 20 mins ' appears  pretty much in all the (peer reviewed) studies I have seen on thermal inactivation of HEV 

 

 

(I would guess from the research, that the 75 degrees core temp suggestion of our Irish colleagues in the link you provided would have some effect on HEV levels- but opinions vary on how significant thast would be!)

 

 

Eg there is a study here  ( again.....small sample size alert!!!!!) Table 2 showing infection rates in pigs from HEV  heated treated at various times/temps- with 70 degrees for 20 mins being the only sample that did not result in infection after 35 days

 

I think with the infective dose 'not known' and mortality rates estimated from 1% up to 20% (for immune compromised individuals)  for the moment..at least ...I'm taking Snookies' advice and steaming my sausages!! :roflmao:  

 

Kind Regards

 

Mike


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Charles.C

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 10:32 AM

Dear MIke,

 

It is possible that the native Irish diet may have also created a strengthened immune system.

(I hypothesise that the English have been softened by all the foreign foods).

 

Or perhaps it's genetic fearlessness via the leprechaun link. :smile:

 

Rgds / Charles


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Mike Green

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 12:03 PM

Dear MIke,

 

It is possible that the native Irish diet may have also created a strengthened immune system.

(I hypothesise that the English have been softened by all the foreign foods).

 

Or perhaps it's genetic fearlessness via the leprechaun link. :smile:

 

Rgds / Charles

ha ha- excellent!

 

...... or possibly it is their extra-ordinary capacity for consumption of alcohol aka........ 'the guinness factor' lol

 

 

 

(though according to the attached (rather nice!) 2010 study-apparently not!)Attached File  SakudoVirus.pdf   808KB   3 downloads

 

Though it does suggest some temperature alternatives to 70 for 20!

 

Mike


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