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Why do non-TCS foods need to be monitored for yeast and mold?


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#1 lisa@codinos

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Posted 06 April 2015 - 06:17 PM

Hi there,

 

I'm kind of new to the field, so my question may be a bit obvious- please bear with me.

 

I was sent a certificate of analysis for packaged Romano cheese. Since it has an Wa value of 0.92 and a pH of 5.3, from what I understand this should be a non-TCS food. Knowing this, it seems okay that the cheese provider did not list results for E. coli, staph, salmonella, and listeria... But then, why did they list yeast and mold? I haven't been able to isolate the reason for this in the FDA food code as of yet.

 

If someone could point me towards the proper section of the article, I'd be greatly appreciative.



#2 Ninja_Neill

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Posted 06 April 2015 - 06:52 PM

I am almost positive they include this due to quality, not safety. A quick look through FDA regulations did not produce any results into the reasoning of including for food safety reasons. I attached a PDF I found on cheese spoilage causes because I feel that is the reasoning for inclusion on the COA.

 

Also found this:

http://www.dairyfora...ial-defects.php

 

 

Your thoughts? 

Attached Files


:ph34r:  :ninja:   "I'm the Secretary of State, brought to you by Carl's Jr."


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#3 Charles.C

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Posted 06 April 2015 - 10:52 PM

Hi there,

 

I'm kind of new to the field, so my question may be a bit obvious- please bear with me.

 

I was sent a certificate of analysis for packaged Romano cheese. Since it has an Wa value of 0.92 and a pH of 5.3, from what I understand this should be a non-TCS food. Knowing this, it seems okay that the cheese provider did not list results for E. coli, staph, salmonella, and listeria... But then, why did they list yeast and mold? I haven't been able to isolate the reason for this in the FDA food code as of yet.

 

If someone could point me towards the proper section of the article, I'd be greatly appreciative.

 

Hello lisa ! Welcome to the forum  and Thank you for Your Query !

 

I would add one comment about microbiological data.

 

Just because bacterial growth is unlikely due to pH/Aw, this does not necessarily prevent bacterial survival, eg peanuts/salmonella.

 

Must confess i had never heard of Romano cheese (it looks delicious) but i daresay it will have a microbiological specification which includes the pathogenic/non-pathogenic organisms in yr OP (see below).

 

From memory yeast&M, as per previous post, is normally regarded as a quality factor however some moulds produce toxins (but perhaps not in Cheese :dunno: )

 

Attached File  Romano cheese - HardCheese-Spec-Sheet.pdf   1.07MB   19 downloads

Attached File  Safe_Cheese_Storage_Romano_Smukowski.pdf   1.31MB   16 downloads

Attached File  American processed Cheese et al,TCS Guidance Document 2006.pdf   1.52MB   18 downloads


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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