Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Micro. Guidelines for Food Contact Surfaces


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

JFatimah

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 14 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Mauritius
    Mauritius

Posted 09 October 2016 - 08:46 PM

Hello all,

 

Can someone tell me if the presence of listeria on clean and disinfected food contact surface is acceptable? If yes can i get the limit range?

 

Thank you

 

 

 



Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 19,486 posts
  • 5387 thanks
1,341
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 10 October 2016 - 02:51 PM

Hello all,

Can someone tell me if the presence of listeria on clean and disinfected food contact surface is acceptable? If yes can i get the limit range?

Thank you

Hi faatimah,

As I understand the official approval of a "sanitizer" in USA requires a validated capability of achieving 5 log reduction under defined conditions for specified pathogens.
So subsequent detection of Listeria may depend on the context of yr OP.
More information on yr procedure/product/process/chemical(s)/surface is required to opine much further.

A generic answer to yr OP could be that, ideally, disinfectants applied under recommended conditions should render a clean, non-porous SS surface, l.monocytogenes free (=undetectable)


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


FurFarmandFork

    Food Safety Consultant, Production Supervisor

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,264 posts
  • 585 thanks
194
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Oregon, USA

Posted 11 October 2016 - 08:03 PM

US listeria climate focuses on L. monocytogenes and other pathogenic strains, and has a zero tolerance for food contact surfaces (or arguably, based on recent enforcement actions, anywhere in your facility).

 

In general,  limits for pathogens should always be zero, since they have the potential to proliferate after the product leaves your control. It also takes a lot of data to have any sort of confidence in quantitative microbial data if you did want to establish a limit above zero. If you're working with good non-porous surfaces and cleaning soils effectively, a 0 pathogens standard on product contact surfaces should be achievable.


Austin Bouck
Owner/Consultant at Fur, Farm, and Fork.
Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

Subscribe to the blog at furfarmandfork.com for food safety research, insights, and analysis.

Ryan M.

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,271 posts
  • 460 thanks
266
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Birmingham, AL
  • Interests:Reading, crosswords, passionate discussions, laughing at US politics.

Posted 11 October 2016 - 09:40 PM

Zero.

 

If you can't get zero, get help from sanitation and maintenance to achieve zero.  A product contact surface should be non-porous and easily cleaned so you should achieve zero every time after sanitation regardless of your process, products, etc.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users