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Single Minute Exchange Of Die (smed)

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Simon

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Posted 22 February 2004 - 10:34 PM

Single Minute Exchange of Die (SMED) is a cornerstone of lean manufacturing and can help to reduce setup time and improve productivity enabling smaller batch sizes to be produced, whilst reducing lead time.

As an example of the power of SMED in 1982 at Toyota, the die punch set up time in the cold-forging process was reduced over a three-month period from one hour and forty minutes to three minutes. :o

Anyone out there using or used SMED to this effect?

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Simon


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Manoj Mathur

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Posted 23 February 2004 - 02:42 AM

Yes, SMED is a powerful element.
We do foil (Aluminum) slitting. Thickness varies from .130 mm to .080 mm. While slitting into narrow strips, lot of time we used to spend on setting the cutters which is for multiple slitting. SMED is used to reduce this setup time from 45 minute to 15 minutes. Now again we are trying to reduce.

Manoj Mathur.

SIMON; I would like to add one presentation on SMED for this forum. I feel it is a big file.
manojmathur@adityabirla.com



Simon

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Posted 23 February 2004 - 08:15 AM

While slitting into narrow strips, lot of time we used to spend on setting the cutters which is for multiple slitting. SMED is used to reduce this setup time from 45 minute to 15 minutes.

Hi Manoj,

What actions did you take to reduce the time from 45 minutes to 15 minutes? And do you think you have made the major, initial gains on this process?
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I have recently increased the file size allocation for uploads. Try one time to attach the file, if you cannot email it to me at simon.timperley@ntlworld.com and I will upload it for you.

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Simon

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Puzzle

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Posted 23 February 2004 - 03:22 PM

SMED - yes.

But ....... it is normally the analysis of the change that reveals the wasted time/actions. Common sense prevails.

If we wished to spend a large amount of money we could have 3 minute tool changes, but the investment in the plant would be prohibitive.

We do have the setter waiting with the clamps, hoses tool etc by the machine for the change. Materials have already prepared a drier (if required - and predried the material) the plann has the best/most advantageous material change etc.

A tool that we take 30 mins to change (defined as last good product to first good product) may take another moulder 2 hrs, and may take a world class facility 10 minutes.



Simon

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Posted 24 February 2004 - 08:59 AM

Puzzle,

You say that you are at 30 minutes per change - what was it pre SMED?

I agree it has to be a commonsense and balanced approach, I suppose a lot of it is down to good orgainsation and changing the mindset of operators, which although not easy, it is possible and cost-effective.

How much was down to this as oppose to physical things e.g. quick release fastenings, changes to equipment etc. Ratio?

Regards,
Simon


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Puzzle

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Posted 24 February 2004 - 10:29 AM

Simon,

Our average time now is 38mins and before the SMED exercise it was 90mins.

We do have some rather large tools (for us) which need to be moved in two halves due to the weight.

The mindset and attitude of the setters was the most improvement. You can have the best and latest quick change techniques - quick mould change, magnetic plattens quick release water couplings etc, but if the setter is not motivated then the time draws out.

We are very selective of our setters, and all have had the appropriate training. We have a company 'code of conduct' which directs the staff to be active at all times. Plus we run the minimum staff. Competition between shifts is also present but this can be a negative.

I have seen state of the art facilities with QMC facilities on a press which was totally negated due to the method the water pipes were fitted !!

I must add our tooling is made to a very defined specification, which permits us to specify what sort of water fitting is used, where they are situated, the method of clamping etc.

If you study just the toolchnage as a singularity, the time savings can be wiped out by poor production planning, poor tooling, and poor equipment.

The whole system must be studied, and this can be an eye opener.

See the production managers face when he realises he has planned a change which has a material change from black glass filled nylon to clear polycarb !!(not at this employer - but I have seen it in numerous occasions at others)

Chris



Simon

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Posted 24 February 2004 - 01:00 PM

Our average time now is 38mins and before the SMED exercise it was 90mins.

Excellent that is certainly some improvement!!!

You're right about the criticality and timing of ancillary inputs to the process, such as material. Imagine doing a 'clean down' of a flexographic printing press and 'make ready' for 9 colours for the next job in Schumacher pit stop speed only to find the material hasn't yet arrived from the supplier. :doh:

One more thing did your people need any convincing on the motives e.g. Time and motion…redundancy etc. Humans are sceptical and fearful of change by nature and they know it's very easy to improve yourself out of a job. Turkeys voting for Christmas and all that…

I suppose the training and communication did the trick?

Regards,
Simon

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Puzzle

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Posted 24 February 2004 - 05:24 PM

Simon,

No negative motivators were used, just the persuasion that the more they did the more we could sell, hence profit etc. :rolleyes:

Communication - they all had a good laugh at the videos, and they were all viewed so no single person was ridiculed.

It was also a return to the shop floor brain storming sessions of old. They who do the job usually have the best ideas for improvement.

This also works for our environmental, H&S, and quality.

Chris



Simon

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 08:07 AM

They who do the job usually have the best ideas for improvement.

They do, they do...but never ask just one of them. :rolleyes:

Simon

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Puzzle

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Posted 25 February 2004 - 01:37 PM

They do, they do...but  never ask just one of them. :rolleyes:

Simon

Too right :ph34r:




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