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Sanitizers that exceeds 200ppm


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#1 smcdonald4

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 08:45 PM

Good Afternoon,

 

What would happen if your sanitizer exceeds 200ppm.  I know 200 ppm is safe but I can't find anywhere that states the conditions or effects if it exceeds...200ppm.

 

Please advise Thank you!



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 05:11 AM

Good Afternoon,

 

What would happen if your sanitizer exceeds 200ppm.  I know 200 ppm is safe but I can't find anywhere that states the conditions or effects if it exceeds...200ppm.

 

Please advise Thank you!

 

Hi smcdonald,

 

With due respect, yr query is unanswerable without more context.

 

eg which sanitizer, which application, how much exceeded ?

 

The answer is likely to be related to "Best Practice" but I am only speculating.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 Dr Vu

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 11:30 AM

as charles said its difficult to answer. is this a no-rinse?

 

you  can just rinse it off i assume


A vu in time , saves nine

#4 RMAV

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 04:12 PM

Always read and follow the label directions.  What does the label say is your limit for your application?



#5 Ryan M.

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 02:25 PM

As others have said follow the label instructions for the specific application method and the intended surface.  These two factors are critically important when determining safe levels of sanitizer use.  Still confused?  Check with your chemical supplier, they should be able to provide you with the technical information.



#6 Karenconstable

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 07:10 AM

The lower limit for sanitisers is to ensure efficacy; not enough active ingredient equals not enough power to 'kill' microbes.

 

The upper limit for sanitisers, and I believe that the US FDA specifies upper limits for many sanitisers, is given for the following reasons:

  • Potential toxicity
  • Flavour/tainting issues
  • Food quality issues (in the case of vegetable washes, for example)
  • Corrosion of equipment (think hypochlorite!)

So if you exceed 200ppm you might find yourself with one or all of the above problems in your facility.  If you are trying to make a food safety or recall decision after discovering a sanitiser was used at an incorrect (overdose) concentration you should contact the sanitiser supplier, ask to speak to their chemist and be very honest about how and where the overdosed sanitiser was used.  They should be able to help with your risk assessment.






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